Questions tagged [medieval-latin]

Questions regarding the Latin of the Medieval period, approximately 500–1400

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3
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1answer
70 views

What are the meaning of these sentences? Christiani victores obsessi

I am trying to translate the chapter titles of four chapters in a medieval source, Caffaro's De Liberatione Civitatum Orientis. Here is the full table of contents: Here are the four chapters I wish ...
6
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0answers
62 views

What was the use and frequency of use of Latin “mactāre”?

In What are the key differences between the main Latin verbs meaning "to kill"? we saw a lot of verbs meaning "to kill" and the differences between them. The fun part of it is that ...
9
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1answer
178 views

Why is *salāta feminine? What was the original noun it is modifying?

OED traces the "salad" family of words (Portuguese salada, Fra. salate, Spa. ensalada, Ita. insalata etc.) to spoken Latin *salāta, from the verb salāre. One notices that salāta as well as ...
5
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1answer
76 views

Why is the Chapel in the Tower of London St Peter AD Vincula, not St Peter in Vinculis?

Why is the Chapel in the Tower of London "St Peter ad Vincula" and not "St Peter in Vinculis"
3
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0answers
55 views

If we say worship is only for God which latin word should we use for worship?

Latria is defined as that worship which is due only to God, unlike other forms of veneration (such as to the Virgin Mary or Saints) which is called Dulia and Hyperdulia. All three, I think, are forms ...
6
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2answers
115 views

Confusing syntax in two sentences

I seem to be confused by the constructions of these two sentences from a Medieval Latin text: Unde vocum alia suavis est illa, scilicet quae subtilis, spissa, clara et acuta est. and Multiplicem ...
5
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0answers
92 views

How old is Ecclesiastical Latin Pronunciation?

Salvete, I have trying to research how old the Ecclesiastical Pronunciation of Latin is. To be more precise, I mean the Italianate pronunciation, called 'La Pronuncia Scolastica' in Italian. Many ...
6
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1answer
77 views

Mountains and Mountain Ranges: Names

I have been recently enjoying Mark Walker's delightful translation of Professor Tolkien's masterpiece, The Hobbit (Hobbitus Ille). I was especially charmed by Tolkien's maps, translated into Latin (...
3
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1answer
93 views

Why does Ecclesiastical Latin pronounce “au” as written?

Salvete, Ecclesiastical Latin, by which I mean here the Italian Traditional Pronunciation seems to have preserved some characteristics of rustic Roman pronunciation despite the spelling remaining ...
4
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1answer
65 views

Non obstante eo

What is the translation of "non obstante eo" in the context of this sentence? Also, is the rest of my translation accurate? This is the original text: De Gentilibus dicitur passim, quod rejectis ...
3
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1answer
56 views

Pronunciation of ngi in Italianate Pronunciation

Salvete, Does anyone know how people schooled in the Italian style of pronunciation would pronounce diphthongi, the plural of diphthongus? I have seen some examples of books printed circa 1700 where ...
2
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0answers
44 views

Cantus de beata virgine quae de ea in sabbatis agitur officium in conventu

This is a rubric for the hymn Ave maris stella from a French 13th century source. Someone helped me and gave me: 'A song for the Blessed Virgin when her office is celebrated on Saturdays in the ...
4
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1answer
110 views

Item versi in laude Christi editi a juvenco presbytero. can[untur] quando reversi fuerint et appropinquant regias ecclesie (sic)

This is a rubric for the hymn Gloria, laus, et honor from an 11th century manuscript. I've asked several people for help on it. Some said it is partly in Italian. I'm not sure why the (sic) is ...
4
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1answer
66 views

ad sextam in tertiis et totis duplicibus

This is a rubric (instruction) for when to sing a hymn. I translated it as "At Sext on third and all doubles." This doesn't seem right to me because the 'third' is redundant. I would like to know ...
6
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1answer
235 views

What did bishop Rémi say to Clovis?

When Clovis, the first king of Franks, stepped into the church where we was to be baptized, he was allegedly told by Rémi, bishop of Reims Depona colla, Sicamber. We were taught at school (in ...
3
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1answer
92 views

Dative/Ablative Substantive Translation?

Is this translation accurate? Qui viam dicit qua ad illam perveniri non tantum potest sed et debet, dicit id quod optimo et optatissimo in vita proximum est. Qui hanc viam ignorat, caetera omnia ...
2
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1answer
89 views

Medieval Latin to English translation

Secundo firmamentum caeli in medio libravit aquarum, ipsis aquis ac terra cum caelo superiore ac virtutibus, quae in ea conditorem laudarent, ante horum sex dierum exordium creatis. This sentence is ...
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1answer
78 views

Instructional book for the Medieval philosophy student

I'm seeking for a book which contains several fragments of the medieval philosophical works, literally translates them and explains the obscure points for who wants to improve his Latin.
9
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1answer
178 views

Which ancient Latin works survived into the Middle Ages or later but are now lost?

While reading Saint Aldhelm's 'Riddles' I saw a reference to Lucan's Orpheus, a Latin poem written in the first century AD. The seventh century writer Aldhelm had a copy of Orpheus, but it is now lost ...
6
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1answer
86 views

finding a Latin quote

I am reading the book "6/5" by Alexandre Laumonier, in French about high-frequency trading in electronic financial markets (bear with me). Near the end of "5", he says Pour autant, comme l'écrivit ...
4
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1answer
388 views

Latinisation of a surname. Seeking advice from expert Latinists

I have a need to Latinise a surname (details about that name are provided further down in my question) rather urgently, but with my miniscule knowledge of Latin I cannot do that myself well. I hope ...
2
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1answer
101 views

Online text of the Officium Parvum

What version do you have of the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium Parvum Beatae Mariae Virginis)? I have the one posted on Play Books but it has some errors. Can you show me where the ...
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1answer
44 views

What do “inexquisitum” and “supramemorati” mean?

In a medieval document I am reading the words "inexquisitum" and "supramemorati" appear. I do not know these words, can not find them on Google and they are not in my dictionary. Does anyone know what ...
4
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1answer
94 views

Help with a medieval Latin sentence

I am trying to translate a sentence in medieval Latin (see below). It comes from a document that concernes an estate that is given to a monastery. Below you can see the relevant excerpt, I bolded the ...
4
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1answer
83 views

Did “sanctifico” ever mean “to make the sign of the cross”?

The Spanish word "santiguar" means "to make the sign of the cross". So for instance, when a Catholic enters a church, s/he "se santigua" (s/he makes the sign of the cross on her/himself). According ...
4
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1answer
124 views

Where does this plural come from?

I am translating a medieval Latin text about the donation of a monastery. In the text there is this sentence: Idcirco noverit omnium fidelium sanctae dei ecclesiae nostrumque praesentium scilicet ...
3
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1answer
69 views

How to translate this medieval sentence

I am trying to translate the following sentence: Si liberalitatis nostrae munere de beneficiis a deo nobis conlatis locis ecclesiasticis quiddam conferimus, id nobis procul dubio as aeternae ...
6
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2answers
423 views

What did “quid pro quo” originally mean?

The phrase quid pro quo means "what for what" in Latin, but that makes very little sense to me. Wikipedia hints at the original meaning having to do with substitutions. That makes sense, as pro can ...
2
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2answers
695 views

What is a “robot” in Latin?

I read in Wikipedia the word robotum and robotor. Also, there is automaton, and androides. I don't see such a word in the [short online version of the] Lexicon Recentis Latinatis by the Vatican (which ...
2
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1answer
56 views

Which word best translates spark as in a spark of energy?

Any latin, my tags aren't a mistake. The more variations the better thanks
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75 views

Latin expression for “carrying something on one's back”

In Spanish, the word cuesta is nowadays used as slope. Nonetheless, the etymology of the word indicates that it comes fom Latin costa, ae meaning "a side" but also "a rib". In fact, an old meaning for ...
3
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1answer
434 views

Variation in the spelling of word-final M

I recently visited the museum of the main monastery of the Carthusian order near Grenoble. I saw this in an open book on display in a former chamber of a monk: What took me by surprise is the ...
6
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1answer
184 views

What does a red v with a dot above mean in the Misal rico de Cisneros (Spain, 1518)?

What do the red v. mean? Manuscript: http://bdh-rd.bne.es/viewer.vm?id=12826&page=246 page 675 As stated in my other question, I've been making the manuscript into a font.
4
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2answers
275 views

Occasus nescius

In the first line of this 12th-century conductus: Sol oritur occasus nescius what does nescius refer to? Maybe diagramming the sentence is all I need, because I don't follow the grammar. If the ...
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63 views

Zeugma on a genitive noun: extraordinary or prosaic?

This Reddit comment points out that there is a zeugma on a genitive noun in this sentence from the conductus "Sol oritur occasus nescius"* in the Hortus Deliciarum: Et filiæ fit pater filius I'd ...
9
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1answer
861 views

What do three diagonal dots above a letter mean in the “Misal rico de Cisneros” (Spain, 1518)?

I can't seem to find this in any books about medieval scribal abbreviations. Manuscript: http://bdh-rd.bne.es/viewer.vm?id=12826&page=246 page 223/1613 They can be found all throughout the ...
8
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1answer
289 views

Why does the Misal rico de Cisneros uses the word “Qiſſa”, and what is it supposed to mean? Why not “Miſſa” (Missa)?

The Misal rico de Cisneros, produced by archbishop Cisneros, the archbishop of Toledo, Spain, in the early sixteenth century, is a Latin Catholic missal also known as the Missale secundum ...
4
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2answers
118 views

The meaning of 'belgicare' in Notker Balbulus

What is the meaning of the obscure verb belgicare or belgico? Background Notker Balbulus of St. Gall (c. 840 to 912) writes this verb in a letter/epistle to a certain Lantbert, wherein Notker defines ...
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1answer
69 views

What is the Tinctura Physica?

This question quotes an alchemical text by Sendivogius, which mentions the Tinctura Physica as equivalent to the Lapis Philosophorum, i.e. the Philosopher's Stone. But what exactly was the Tinctura ...
5
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2answers
356 views

Longest Text in Latin

What are the longest texts, say top 5, transmitted via manuscript from the Classical/Early Medieval period?
5
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1answer
647 views

Translation of the latin word 'sit' in Thomas Aquinas' works

Modern translations of medieval texts frequently translate the Latin verb 'sit' as he/she/it is. However, 'sit' is the subjunctive mood of the verb 'sum'. In my view it should be translated as he/...
4
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1answer
170 views

What is the “apparatus fontium”?

I have encountered with apparatus fontium for example in this reference: Gundissalinus, De divisione philosophiae, apparatus fontium ad pp. 36 –7 What is it and what is it's the literal meaning?
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4answers
302 views

Meaning of “individuandum”

What is the meaning and structure of individuandum? I guess that it is an accusative gerund of unknown verb to me. For example in this context: (Siger de Brabant, Quaestiones in metaphysicam, 1981, p....
6
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1answer
162 views

In what sense is a university (universitas) a whole?

The word for a university in many languages (not Finnish though!) comes the Latin word universitas. The word appears to mean roughly "the whole", but one might also analyze it along the lines of "...
8
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2answers
625 views

What sort of grammatical construct is ‘Quod per sortem sternit fortem’?

In the poem ‘O Fortuna’ (anon., 13th c., but made famous by Carl Orff’s setting), there is this verse: Quod per sortem sternit fortem mecum omnes plangite! This is typically translated as ‘...
3
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1answer
153 views

Which Latin verb was closer to the current meaning of English “solve”?

Nowadays the English verb solve means: Find an answer to, explanation for, or means of effectively dealing with (a problem or mystery). The etymology of the word indicates that it comes: from ...
6
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1answer
101 views

Help with paleography in a 16th century grant

I'm transcribing/translating a 16th century document relating to my ancestors, but struggling with a few words. One in particular is proving difficult - the contracted last word on the 1st line of the ...
6
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5answers
237 views

How does one “imitate into everything”?

"Good King Wenceslas" is a classic Christmas song, but its melody was taken from an older song: "Tempus Adest Floridum", from the Finnish carol book Piae Cantiones ("Pious Songs"). The first few ...
11
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2answers
205 views

what does “less correctly” mean in the Lewis & Short?

1. L&S: caenum (less correctly coenum) L&S: cena (not coena, caena) It seems “coenum” and “coena” both are medieval spellings which were straight borrowed from Greek. So both of them should ...
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223 views

Was the name “Sasan/Sassan” often spelled with a double S in Latin or Greek?

A question on ELU (“Sassanian” vs. “Sasanian”) brought up the fact that the name of Sāsān has often been spelled in English with a double S in the middle: "Sassan". (The same goes for related words ...