Questions tagged [meaning]

For questions regarding the meaning or connotation of a word or phrase.

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68 views

What is the meaning of “cin” in the phrases “petras omnes cin cum…”?

So I've been trying to figure out the Latin lyircs in "Hellfire" from the video game Final Fantasy XV. It's really hard to make out what they're saying, and the only part that I've managed ...
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62 views

What was the use and frequency of use of Latin “mactāre”?

In What are the key differences between the main Latin verbs meaning "to kill"? we saw a lot of verbs meaning "to kill" and the differences between them. The fun part of it is that ...
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2answers
122 views

What is the latin phrase for knowing a mistake and doing it anyway

I am trying to remember a latin quote that says something like "I know I am wrong but I do it anyway." I remember reading it in a book. It's not much to go on, but if someone knows it, it ...
6
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2answers
384 views

How can we distinguish “Si vis pacem, para bellum” translations?

On Wikipedia it is said that Si vis pacem, para bellum means "If you want peace, prepare for war". But I think that It also seems like "If you want peace, prepare war". What makes ...
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59 views

Passage from Odington

I am looking at a short passage from Odington's treaty on music, and am unsure about the last bit, particularly the meaning of "abiectus" in this context. I admit to having limited skill reading Latin-...
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1answer
112 views

Res vs Obiectus

What is the difference in meaning between Res and Obiectus( is it merely a matter of Language evolution Classical vs Medieval)? As a meaning I am interested in that which (the thing that) is related ...
3
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2answers
349 views

Furtum est, secundum lege lata, contrectatio rei alienae fraudulenta

How to say this in proper, idiomatic, classical Latin? Theft is, according to existing law, laying hands on others' (foreign, strange, belonging to others) things fraudulently. Would one use the ...
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3answers
120 views

Can “ad aliquid” mean “the same”?

Grimms' glossed German einschlägig thus: spectans, pertinens ad aliquid, bezüglich I was looking to understand what einschlägig means, which is only used in fixed expressions, and I'm affraid I ...
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1answer
312 views

Semantic difference of ablative and accusative cases when following “in”

What is the semantic and conceptual difference of ablative and accusative cases when following in? Examples: In dubio pro reo & opinio iuris uniformis et in longo usu Dubio and longo are in ...
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1answer
129 views

What does “non oportet” mean?

When verbs that recommend an action to some degree (such as should, must, ought) are negated, there are two possible interpretations: (a) the action is simply not recommended, nor anything else; or (b)...
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1answer
110 views

Best Latin translation of an English Phrase “Always Present, Never Seen”

I am designing some potential products for my organization, and I want to include a version that includes a tag line written in Latin of one of the our organizational values. The phrase I'm looking ...
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1answer
393 views

Meaning of “Spiritus Libertatis”

Another question from the frequent latin expressions in Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose. Here a character is complaining about evil followers from Spiritus Libertatis. I saw that this could ...
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7answers
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Can one translate ἀθάνατος as 'living' rather than 'immortal'?

Context There is an old hymn, often referred to as the Trisagion or Thrice-Holy. It goes like this in Greek: Ἅγιος ὁ Θεός, Ἅγιος ἰσχυρός, Ἅγιος ἀθάνατος, ἐλέησον ἡμᾶς. (Transliterated, this reads,...
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1answer
2k views

Meaning of “cum inter nonnullos”

I'm reading The Name of the Rose, by Umberto Eco, which has a lot of Latin phrases and expressions, since the story is set in the 14th century and the protagonist is a franciscan friar. The expression ...
6
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3answers
137 views

How do you say to “bear in mind” or to always “keep in mind” in Latin?

Self explanatory question. Okay so I know the word ‘remember’ in Latin is ‘memento.’ but I heard that there are different variations like meminero or something, but is there a way to say “to keep in ...
3
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1answer
147 views

How do I translate “Eternal light guide me”?

Am a guy, planning to get this tattooed and coming from a Latin-illiterate background (never studied Latin in my life). Context: to remind me of God's guidance throughout my life and to continue to ...
4
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1answer
83 views

Did “sanctifico” ever mean “to make the sign of the cross”?

The Spanish word "santiguar" means "to make the sign of the cross". So for instance, when a Catholic enters a church, s/he "se santigua" (s/he makes the sign of the cross on her/himself). According ...
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66 views

Negotia Essentialia and Essentialia Negotii

As Per Essentialia negotii transaction's essentials. Did the Classical Roman Scholars in Roman Law use Essentialia Negotii? Wouldn't it be more gramatical to use Negotia Essentialia to refer to ...
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75 views

What was the difference in the concept of “colour” in Latin and modern languages?

For this question: Are there Latin words for hair color?, I had to search a little about the concept of "color" in Latin. I also had a debate on another SE, with people who consider that &...
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2answers
423 views

What did “quid pro quo” originally mean?

The phrase quid pro quo means "what for what" in Latin, but that makes very little sense to me. Wikipedia hints at the original meaning having to do with substitutions. That makes sense, as pro can ...
6
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1answer
119 views

Appropinquare: difference in the meaning according to the case?

Is there a difference in the meaning, between "appropinquare" + dative, and "appropinquare" + ad + accusative? Dictionaries are not very clear about it. https://outils.biblissima.fr/fr/collatinus-...
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190 views

Difference between dexter/sinister and rectus/laevus?

Is there a difference between the pair dexter/sinister (right/left) and rectus/laevus? I was only aware of the pair dexter/sinister until recently, when I learned that chiral molecules in molecular ...
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41 views

Difference between Sententia and Opinio?

Could you give some examples of sentences showing the difference between Opinio and Sentencia? Aren't both good translations for "opinions?" "Through" and "opinion" seems to be translated by both: ...
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1answer
84 views

Meanings of cibus, and cibi

The dictionary I use tells me that Cibus, could mean "food", or "meals" or "dishes", and many other related meanings. So, I find logical, that, when you have the plural, it means rather meals/dishes. ...
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35 views

What is the difference between fessus and lassatus in Latin?

Could one of them implies a physical fatigue, and the other one a psychological/emotional one. Or is it a matter of intensity? Please, give me some sentences as examples.
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1answer
92 views

Coming from physically or originate from a place? (Ab Gallia venio)

With "Ab Gallia venio. or "De Gallia venio". (Or other sentences of the same kind) Could it mean both, I come from this place, or I am originated from this place (like a nationality, or the origin of ...
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316 views

Meaning of “condition-ut-extremis” in Dune

Excerpt From: Frank Herbert, Dune “The wisdom of seeding the known universe with a prophecy pattern for the protection of B.G. personnel has long been appreciated, but never have we seen a condition-...
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183 views

Is it gibberish, a real ceremony, or a Latin joke?

I have just been watching an old TV series called Porterhouse Blue which is a Tom Sharpe comedy about an ultra-conservative and old fashioned university called Porterhouse. At one point there is a ...
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180 views

Cibus sanus — healthy food?

The Duolingo Latin course uses sanus as "healthy" in connection with meals. A healthy lunch would be prandium sanum according to the course. But I always thought that sanus is only refers to the ...
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1answer
55 views

Explanatory and Etymological dictionary of the Latin Language

With the term explanatory I am translating ερμηνευτικό. A dictionary which defines words comprehensively and clearly. If one considers Oxford University to be the authority on the English language ...
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2answers
123 views

Essentialia negotii transaction's essentials

So essentialia negotii is transaction's essentials. How would one say The transaction's essential things, transactions' essential things, essential things of the transaction and essential things of ...
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2answers
1k views

Is the adjective in latin put after the noun or before?

E.g Is the legal term essentialia negotii correct use of the grammar(declension, agreement, word order) rules or not? Should it not be negotiorum essentialium so that the case, the number and the ...
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2answers
156 views

Did the Romans ever use 'decimatio' in a generalized sense?

Decimātiō was a Roman term for a military punishment where a group was reduced by a tenth. But in modern English, decimation is used generically to mean 'greatly reduced or damaged', often in ...
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1answer
189 views

Translation of ει μη

Following a thread on german.SE I wondered why ει μη is translated as German "außer" (other than, except; translated as "unless" in one of the links) Epistle to the Romans (13, 1). The wiktionary ...
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80 views

How would you translate γέγονεν in John 1:15?

I'm translating the 15th verse of John 1, and I'm curious to know the nuances of translating the phrase ὁ ὀπίσω μου ἐρχόμενος ἔμπροσθέν μου γέγονεν, and especially the word γέγονεν. Below is the NA28 ...
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1answer
58 views

Is “their” being masculine or feminine?

The phrase I'm wondering about is "causas sui odii" — 'the cause of their hatred'. The men are discussing the cause of their (the men's) hatred? or the cause of their (the women's) hatred? If ...
6
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2answers
182 views

What is the difference in meaning/usage between “nasciturus” and “nascendus”?

Both nasciturus and nascendus seem to exist. Words ending in -turus are often described as future active participles, and words ending in -ndus as future passive participles (they are also called ...
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4answers
302 views

Meaning of “individuandum”

What is the meaning and structure of individuandum? I guess that it is an accusative gerund of unknown verb to me. For example in this context: (Siger de Brabant, Quaestiones in metaphysicam, 1981, p....
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2answers
334 views

“ne paelici suspectaretur” (Tacitus)

Tacitus, Annales 4.3: pellit domo Seianus uxorem Apicatam, ex qua tres liberos genuerat, ne paelici suspectaretur. The translation on Perseus (Church and Brodribb) gives: Sejanus, to avert his ...
3
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1answer
73 views

Fair Enough--Revisited

A recent Q concerned the use of "fair enough" at the termination of a conversation/ debate-cum-argument about Brexit, or extending the Empire, or whatever. The OP (What does OP stand for?) advised a ...
2
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1answer
48 views

What is the connection between figs and pride in the word Caprificus?

I have seen the definitions of caprificus (caper + ficus = goat + fig) include both pride and fig trees /goat-figs. Are goats considered particularly prideful? I would think they would be more ...
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3answers
187 views

Does 'ipse' truly mean change?

This quote hails from the liner notes to this CD: John Adams's Violin Concerto performed by Leila Josefowicz, David Robertson of St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. Alice Miller Cotter has a BA in Music (...
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2answers
102 views

Difference between “immergo” and “summergo”

In Spanish we have the verb sumergir, coming from Latin: sum-mergo (subm-), si, sum, 3, v. a., I. to dip or plunge under, to sink, overwhelm, submerge, submerse. Nonetheless, some related ...
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1answer
327 views

Does “Dominei” mean something?

I am not at all an expert in Latin, but I am a Spanish speaker so our languages are a little related, at least. I was wondering if I could just add suffixes to words to make new words. Sometimes, in ...
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1answer
72 views

Exact meaning of aurora in canon law?

Aurora means dawn, that's well known. But there is more than one type of dawn. The English Wikipedia knows three types: astronomical (18°), nautical (12°) and civil dawn (sun 6° below the horizon). ...
10
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1answer
370 views

Did “benedicere” ever mean “to blaspheme”?

I was struck by some verses in Chapter 21 of 3 Regum, Vulgata. This tells the story of Naboth, an Israelite who owned a vineyard which was adjacent to the palace of the Israeli King, Achab. Naboth ...
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3answers
213 views

What did σκάλα exactly mean in Byzantine Greek?

In Spanish we have a word escala that means "stopover" as "a break in a journey", specially when travelling by sea. According to the dictionary by the Royal Spanish Academy, the word comes from ...
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2answers
2k views

On the literal meaning of “in saecula saeculorum”

Literally, this phrase (found originally in the New Testament of the Vulgata) is translated as "into [the] ages of [the] ages". It's supposed to be an expression of eternity, and it's commonly ...
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2answers
1k views

Why and when would “num” be used?

According to what I understand num is used when the asker of the question is already aware that the answer will be no. Does this have any other uses besides rhetorical questions?
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What does “Dominus providebit” mean?

Does "Dominus providebit" mean "The Lord will provide" or "The Lord provides"? I once had a bit of an argument with a guy who studied Latin over that. It's an inscription that appears on the rim of ...