Questions tagged [meaning]

For questions regarding the meaning or connotation of a word or phrase.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4
votes
0answers
58 views

Passage from Odington

I am looking at a short passage from Odington's treaty on music, and am unsure about the last bit, particularly the meaning of "abiectus" in this context. I admit to having limited skill reading Latin-...
3
votes
2answers
347 views

Furtum est, secundum lege lata, contrectatio rei alienae fraudulenta

How to say this in proper, idiomatic, classical Latin? Theft is, according to existing law, laying hands on others' (foreign, strange, belonging to others) things fraudulently. Would one use the ...
2
votes
1answer
110 views

Res vs Obiectus

What is the difference in meaning between Res and Obiectus( is it merely a matter of Language evolution Classical vs Medieval)? As a meaning I am interested in that which (the thing that) is related ...
-2
votes
3answers
112 views

Can “ad aliquid” mean “the same”?

Grimms' glossed German einschlägig thus: spectans, pertinens ad aliquid, bezüglich I was looking to understand what einschlägig means, which is only used in fixed expressions, and I'm affraid I ...
7
votes
1answer
310 views

Semantic difference of ablative and accusative cases when following “in”

What is the semantic and conceptual difference of ablative and accusative cases when following in? Examples: In dubio pro reo & opinio iuris uniformis et in longo usu Dubio and longo are in ...
11
votes
8answers
5k views

What is the Latin joke here?

The other day I watched Evil under the sun, a film about Agatha Christie's homonymous novel, where the following lines were said: Patrick Redfern: It's funny to think, if Giuseppe Verdi had been an ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

On the literal meaning of “in saecula saeculorum”

Literally, this phrase (found originally in the New Testament of the Vulgata) is translated as "into [the] ages of [the] ages". It's supposed to be an expression of eternity, and it's commonly ...
10
votes
3answers
131 views

Vivitne metaphora “de” in “demonstro”?

I found the following inscription above a sundial outside the York Minster: LVCEM DEMONSTRAT VMBRA This seems extraordinarily poetic to me, for many reasons. One reason is the reversal of prosaic ...
9
votes
1answer
123 views

What does “non oportet” mean?

When verbs that recommend an action to some degree (such as should, must, ought) are negated, there are two possible interpretations: (a) the action is simply not recommended, nor anything else; or (b)...
3
votes
1answer
101 views

Best Latin translation of an English Phrase “Always Present, Never Seen”

I am designing some potential products for my organization, and I want to include a version that includes a tag line written in Latin of one of the our organizational values. The phrase I'm looking ...
9
votes
1answer
368 views

Meaning of “Spiritus Libertatis”

Another question from the frequent latin expressions in Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose. Here a character is complaining about evil followers from Spiritus Libertatis. I saw that this could ...
11
votes
7answers
2k views

Can one translate ἀθάνατος as 'living' rather than 'immortal'?

Context There is an old hymn, often referred to as the Trisagion or Thrice-Holy. It goes like this in Greek: Ἅγιος ὁ Θεός, Ἅγιος ἰσχυρός, Ἅγιος ἀθάνατος, ἐλέησον ἡμᾶς. (Transliterated, this reads,...
6
votes
3answers
132 views

How do you say to “bear in mind” or to always “keep in mind” in Latin?

Self explanatory question. Okay so I know the word ‘remember’ in Latin is ‘memento.’ but I heard that there are different variations like meminero or something, but is there a way to say “to keep in ...
16
votes
1answer
2k views

Meaning of “cum inter nonnullos”

I'm reading The Name of the Rose, by Umberto Eco, which has a lot of Latin phrases and expressions, since the story is set in the 14th century and the protagonist is a franciscan friar. The expression ...
12
votes
6answers
44k views

What does memento mori actually mean?

I'm wondering what memento mori actually means. From Wikipedia, I see the meaning is "you must die" but that makes it sound like a threat. Legend said that one of the war prisoner use the word for ...
11
votes
3answers
329 views

Is “victa serpente” an ablative absolute?

I'm reading Ovid's Metamorphoses, and there's this sentence: Delius hunc nuper, victa serpente superbus, viderat adducto flectentem cornua nervo “quid” que “tibi, lascive puer, cum fortibus ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

Prae- & Ante- (before)

The prefixes prae- and ante- both have the same meaning of 'before' in place or time. Why is the existence of both words necessary?
3
votes
1answer
138 views

How do I translate “Eternal light guide me”?

Am a guy, planning to get this tattooed and coming from a Latin-illiterate background (never studied Latin in my life). Context: to remind me of God's guidance throughout my life and to continue to ...
4
votes
1answer
81 views

Did “sanctifico” ever mean “to make the sign of the cross”?

The Spanish word "santiguar" means "to make the sign of the cross". So for instance, when a Catholic enters a church, s/he "se santigua" (s/he makes the sign of the cross on her/himself). According ...
0
votes
0answers
65 views

Negotia Essentialia and Essentialia Negotii

As Per Essentialia negotii transaction's essentials. Did the Classical Roman Scholars in Roman Law use Essentialia Negotii? Wouldn't it be more gramatical to use Negotia Essentialia to refer to ...
7
votes
2answers
29k views

Is my interpretation of “Ad Astra per Aspera” correct?

I came across the phrase ad astra per aspera — "to the stars through difficulties." I think I know what it means, but my interpretation appears to be at odds with others. For example: The ...
3
votes
0answers
72 views

What was the difference in the concept of “colour” in Latin and modern languages?

For this question: Are there Latin words for hair color?, I had to search a little about the concept of "color" in Latin. I also had a debate on another SE, with people who consider that &...
6
votes
2answers
405 views

What did “quid pro quo” originally mean?

The phrase quid pro quo means "what for what" in Latin, but that makes very little sense to me. Wikipedia hints at the original meaning having to do with substitutions. That makes sense, as pro can ...
7
votes
1answer
125 views

(Greek) what's a “γε causal”?

I read in the very beginning of Platon's Laches (perseus edition): τεθέασθε μὲν τὸν ἄνδρα μαχόμενον ἐν ὅπλοις, ὦ Νικία τε καὶ Λάχης: οὗ δ᾽ ἕνεκα ὑμᾶς ἐκελεύσαμεν συνθεάσασθαι ἐγώ τε καὶ Μελησίας ...
6
votes
1answer
113 views

Appropinquare: difference in the meaning according to the case?

Is there a difference in the meaning, between "appropinquare" + dative, and "appropinquare" + ad + accusative? Dictionaries are not very clear about it. https://outils.biblissima.fr/fr/collatinus-...
10
votes
1answer
550 views

Does 'verbum' mean both word and verb?

The word verbum means "word", but I want to find out whether it can also have the more specific meaning "verb" (as opposed to other kinds of words). Lewis and Short does not list &...
6
votes
0answers
110 views

Did Alexander the Great change the meaning of “Hellenes”?

The Hellenistic era was launched by Alexander the Great, and his death is usually defined as the starting point. The Greek word Hellenes (Ἕλληνες) was in use before, during, and after the Hellenistic ...
4
votes
0answers
167 views

Difference between dexter/sinister and rectus/laevus?

Is there a difference between the pair dexter/sinister (right/left) and rectus/laevus? I was only aware of the pair dexter/sinister until recently, when I learned that chiral molecules in molecular ...
11
votes
3answers
3k views

How did mundus come to mean both world and clean?

Basically what's in the title: How did mundus come to mean both world and clean? L&S lists a number of other meanings, but in my knowledge these are two very frequent uses, that do not seem to ...
3
votes
1answer
84 views

Meanings of cibus, and cibi

The dictionary I use tells me that Cibus, could mean "food", or "meals" or "dishes", and many other related meanings. So, I find logical, that, when you have the plural, it means rather meals/dishes. ...
2
votes
0answers
40 views

Difference between Sententia and Opinio?

Could you give some examples of sentences showing the difference between Opinio and Sentencia? Aren't both good translations for "opinions?" "Through" and "opinion" seems to be translated by both: ...
3
votes
1answer
91 views

Coming from physically or originate from a place? (Ab Gallia venio)

With "Ab Gallia venio. or "De Gallia venio". (Or other sentences of the same kind) Could it mean both, I come from this place, or I am originated from this place (like a nationality, or the origin of ...
2
votes
0answers
35 views

What is the difference between fessus and lassatus in Latin?

Could one of them implies a physical fatigue, and the other one a psychological/emotional one. Or is it a matter of intensity? Please, give me some sentences as examples.
3
votes
0answers
275 views

Meaning of “condition-ut-extremis” in Dune

Excerpt From: Frank Herbert, Dune “The wisdom of seeding the known universe with a prophecy pattern for the protection of B.G. personnel has long been appreciated, but never have we seen a condition-...
16
votes
5answers
7k views

What is the meaning of “Ex Lux”, the name of Lucifer Morningstar's new bar?

I've been a fan of Mike Carey's Lucifer comic series, for its believable portrait of a fallen angel. The series spun off from Neil Gaiman's The Sandman, which established this incarnation of Lucifer ...
55
votes
5answers
6k views

Are “-que” and “et” equivalent?

I was taught that one can use the '-que' suffix to string together multiple words, in a similar way to putting 'et' between them. Are these two equivalent? Did one have a connotation in classical (...
5
votes
0answers
95 views

How did the figurative meaning of 'iniungere' develop from the literal one?

The verb iniungere (a compound of in- and iungere) literally means "to join, fasten, attach". However, an Etymonline entry also gives it a figurative meaning "to inflict, to attack, impose". How was ...
7
votes
1answer
72 views

Exact meaning of aurora in canon law?

Aurora means dawn, that's well known. But there is more than one type of dawn. The English Wikipedia knows three types: astronomical (18°), nautical (12°) and civil dawn (sun 6° below the horizon). ...
9
votes
3answers
176 views

Is it gibberish, a real ceremony, or a Latin joke?

I have just been watching an old TV series called Porterhouse Blue which is a Tom Sharpe comedy about an ultra-conservative and old fashioned university called Porterhouse. At one point there is a ...
7
votes
3answers
177 views

Cibus sanus — healthy food?

The Duolingo Latin course uses sanus as "healthy" in connection with meals. A healthy lunch would be prandium sanum according to the course. But I always thought that sanus is only refers to the ...
2
votes
2answers
121 views

Essentialia negotii transaction's essentials

So essentialia negotii is transaction's essentials. How would one say The transaction's essential things, transactions' essential things, essential things of the transaction and essential things of ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Explanatory and Etymological dictionary of the Latin Language

With the term explanatory I am translating ερμηνευτικό. A dictionary which defines words comprehensively and clearly. If one considers Oxford University to be the authority on the English language ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the adjective in latin put after the noun or before?

E.g Is the legal term essentialia negotii correct use of the grammar(declension, agreement, word order) rules or not? Should it not be negotiorum essentialium so that the case, the number and the ...
9
votes
2answers
25k views

What is meant by the expression 'Sic Transit Gloria Mundi'?

The phrase is used when in the ceremony of assigning a new pope, and can be interpreted in many ways. A translation would be: "So pass the worldly glories." How would you interpret its meaning, ...
3
votes
2answers
156 views

Did the Romans ever use 'decimatio' in a generalized sense?

Decimātiō was a Roman term for a military punishment where a group was reduced by a tenth. But in modern English, decimation is used generically to mean 'greatly reduced or damaged', often in ...
2
votes
3answers
185 views

Does 'ipse' truly mean change?

This quote hails from the liner notes to this CD: John Adams's Violin Concerto performed by Leila Josefowicz, David Robertson of St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. Alice Miller Cotter has a BA in Music (...
2
votes
1answer
186 views

Translation of ει μη

Following a thread on german.SE I wondered why ει μη is translated as German "außer" (other than, except; translated as "unless" in one of the links) Epistle to the Romans (13, 1). The wiktionary ...
3
votes
0answers
74 views

How would you translate γέγονεν in John 1:15?

I'm translating the 15th verse of John 1, and I'm curious to know the nuances of translating the phrase ὁ ὀπίσω μου ἐρχόμενος ἔμπροσθέν μου γέγονεν, and especially the word γέγονεν. Below is the NA28 ...
4
votes
2answers
212 views

“Malo” in Motto Maelstrom

The motto for Concordia University Saint Paul (MN) reads: "In litteris proficere volo, malo diligere Jesum." The CSP website, magazine (Spring 2009), and various internet sources offer these ...
6
votes
2answers
330 views

“ne paelici suspectaretur” (Tacitus)

Tacitus, Annales 4.3: pellit domo Seianus uxorem Apicatam, ex qua tres liberos genuerat, ne paelici suspectaretur. The translation on Perseus (Church and Brodribb) gives: Sejanus, to avert his ...