Questions tagged [lingua-latina-per-se-illustrata]

For questions about Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata (LLPSI) by Hans Henning Ørberg.

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Case query: LLPSI FM p. 82

What is the syntax of "Aemilia nōn putat medicum puerum aegrum sānāre posse."? I cannot understand the agreement of "medicum puerum aegrum sānāre posse.". Regards
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Prana = anima or spiritus?

On p. 188 of Breath, James Nestor writes: The concept of prana was first documented in India and China…, some 3,000 years ago, and became the bedrock of medicine. The Chinese called it ch'i and ...
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9 votes
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"quae haec mihi dōna dedistī"

In the story "Atalanta" in Fābulae Syrae by Luigi Miraglia, Venus gives Hippomenes three golden apples to throw during a foot race with Atalanta, to distract her. As he throws the third ...
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6 votes
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Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, chapter 6, weird sentence with passive voice

In Exercitia Latina, part 1 in the exercises for this chapter there is the following sentence: "Servi mali dominum timent neque a domino timentur." I can not grasp its meaning. I can (...
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6 votes
1 answer
216 views

"Quam" as relative pronoun or conjunction?

In LLpsI 38:106: Italia, ..., longō cursū abs tē dīviditur: prius circum Siciliam tibi nāvigandum est quam in illā terrā urbem condere poteris. What is the role of quam here? If it is relative, what ...
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4 votes
1 answer
258 views

Greek equivelent to Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata

I have been working my way though Ørberg's Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, and I have been wondering whether there is an equivalent text for learning Ancient Greek by the "natural method." ...
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3 votes
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Questions about some sentences

I met some sentences in Lingua Latin per se Illustrata: Roma Aeterna that I can hardly understand: Hīc Aenēās genitōrem Anchīsēn āmīsit, ille enim cōnfectus aetāte ē vītā excessit — nēquīquam ex ...
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What does "ensem sufferre" mean?

In Lingua Latina per se Illustrata: Roma Aeterna: Ch. 37 Line 173: Cui (=Priamō) Pyrrhus “Nunc morere!” inquit, senemque ... ad ipsam āram trāxit, ubi laevā comam eius prehendēns dextrā ēnsem ...
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88 views

When to use present form for a past thing?

I'm reading the passage about the Trojan War in Lingua Latina per se Illustrata: Roma Aeterna (Ch. 37). The verbs are mostly in past forms (imperf., perf. or plup.), but in line 140~142: Aenēās vērō, ...
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237 views

Sentences hard to understand (LLpsI)

Ecce eī in somnō appāruit maestissimus Hector, fīlius Priamī mortuus — sed quālis erat, quantum mūtātus ab illō Hectore quī ex tot proeliīs victor redierat! Sordidam barbam crīnēsque cruentōs gerēbat ...
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266 views

What does "Graecōs Argōs" in this sentence mean? (LLpsI)

Trōiānī vērō, cum Graecōs Argōs in patriam suam āvectōs esse arbitrārentur, tum dēmum post tot annōs portās aperuērunt atque exīre ausī sunt. as is annotated, Argī is a city, but I can hardly ...
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240 views

Why is the subject in the infinitive clause in accusative case?

Dōrippa: Nūlla fēmina mē miserior vīvit, Sanniō. Melius est mē mortuam esse quam sine amīcīs in hāc urbe vivere!" Sanniō: Quid ais: 'sine amīcīs'? Nūper nōn modo Lepidus... Why is mē mortuam ...
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Why is the verb indicative in an indirect question?

Sed, nescio quomodo, multas res video quae incertum me faciunt. Why is videō in the quōmodo-clause (which I think to be an indirect question) indicative instead of subjuctive?
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What does "sē" here stand for?

What does sē here means? (Lingua Latina per se Illustrata: Colloquia Personarum: 19) "It is not necessary for him to praise himself" seems strange in the context.
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6 votes
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Is there any verb omitted in this sentence? (LLPSI)

In Lingua Latin per se Illustrata: Chapter 32, Line 158: Sed frūstrā hoc optō, nam iam illī pīrātae eam spem mihi ēripient, idque eōdem diē quō ab amīcā meā dēsertus sum. dēsertus sum seems to be ...
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7 votes
1 answer
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What does "vel potius" mean in this sentence from LLpsI?

Mare et ventī nēminī oboediunt nisi Neptūnō. Ille cūrāvit ut nōs ē tempestāte servārēmur nēve mergerēmur — vel potius nōs ipsī quī mercēs ējēcimus. It's a sentence out of Chap.28 of Lingua Latina per ...
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7 votes
2 answers
285 views

Questions from LLpsI

There is a sentence in Lingua Latina per se Illustrata Chap. 28 that I can't understand. Lydia libellum, quem adhuc intra vestem occultavit, promit et Medo ostendit. Qui manum extendens libellum ...
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5 votes
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What does PER PORTAM CAPENAM ROMAM mean in this sentence?

Is quī viā Latīnā venit per portam Capēnam Rōmam intrat. Since it's all Accusative, I'm having a hard time figuring out what it means. I'm guessing it might mean something like He who comes from the ...
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11 votes
1 answer
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Why is nominative instead of ablative absolute used in 'Ibi egressi Trojani'?

In LLPSI 2 'Roma Æterna', Chapter XLI 'Origines', it is written: Ibi [Siciliâ] egressi Trojani, quibus ab immenso prope errore nihil præter arma et naves supererat, cum prædam ex agris agerent, ...
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9 votes
1 answer
299 views

What does "Non procul abest" mean?

In chapter 8 of Lingua Latina per se illustrata we have: Non procul abest. What does this mean? I understand every word but not really the sentence. If it was "non procul est" I would ...
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Differences between cano and canto

In Cap. X of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces the verb cano, having introduced canto in a previous chapter. The usage of both so far is just sing, but are there more nuanced differences between the two? From ...
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5 votes
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Understanding the sentence "Cum avis volat, alae moventur" from LLPSI

In Cap. X of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces these three sentences: Cum avis volat, alae moventur. Cum homo ambulat, pedes moventur. Cum piscis natat, cauda movetur. While I understand the general meaning ...
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3 votes
3 answers
438 views

Is "dentibus" ablative in "Lupus collum ovis petit dentibus..."

In Cap. IX of LLPSI Pars I, Ørberg tells the story of a black sheep wandering into the forest where it's confronted by a wolf. The wolf finds the sheep alone in the darkness of the forest, and the ...
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8 votes
1 answer
428 views

What form is 'numerārī'?

In chapter X of Orberg's Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata there is this sentence: Piscēs numerārī nōn possunt. From the context I would translate this as an infinitive. But the infinitive should be ...
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9 votes
2 answers
860 views

Is the 'i' in 'videt' long or short?

I am currently reading Ørberg’s Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, where he thankfully makes use of the macron to distinguish long vowels form short ones. However, and I have seen this elsewhere as well,...
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9 votes
4 answers
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Why is this a correct sentence: "Iūlius nōn sōlus, sed cum magnā familiā habitat"?

In Familia Romana Cap. 5 there is this sentence: Iūlius nōn sōlus, sed cum Aemiliā et cum magnā familiā in vīllā habitat. I'm struggling to understand why this sentence is grammatically correct. ...
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Servus dominum orabat ne se verbera–

Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, cap. XXVIII, pensum A (p. 230) begins by asking the reader to fill in the blank in this sentence, with the appropriate conjunctive imperfect conjugation: Servus ...
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7 votes
1 answer
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Why is Italiae used rather than Italis in the phrase "In hortis Italiae"?

In the Grammatica Latina at the end of Cap. V of LLPSI Pars I, Ørberg has the following examples for singular and plural ablative of each gender: [A] Masculinum. In horto Iulii. In hortis Italiae. [...
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3 votes
1 answer
129 views

LLPSI does not load on Google Play Books in web browsers

I recently purchased LLPSI on Google Play Books; I already own it as a kindle book, but Google had a bundle that included Pars II and a companion book. Unfortunately, I can't get it to load in Safari, ...
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6 votes
2 answers
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The use of et...et and the following grammar

Salvete omnes, doctissimi amici et amicae, a question rose from Orberg LLPSI I, where it says: "Iam et Marcus et Quintus mala habent." Why would he use the accusativus pluralis of malum when ...
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8 votes
1 answer
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Difference between 'urbe' and 'oppidum'?

I have found that LLPSI uses oppidum to describe cities (at least in the early chapters) while Duolingo uses urbe. What is the difference, and which should I usually use?
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3 votes
1 answer
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When you finish "lingua latina per se illustrata" can you understand latin books easily?

As It is said in title, when you finish "lingua latina per se illustrata" by Hans H. Ørberg How much can you understand a latin manuscript? Or should one follow some other books after it?
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1 answer
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Why are some of these names ending in -a and some in -ae?

Reading LLPSI, in PENSVM B of Capitula 2, there is this passage: Syra ancilla Aemiliae est. Aemilia domina Syrae est. Are Aemiliae and Syrae the direct objects, thus they are conjugated that way?
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2 votes
1 answer
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How to determine the ending of a Latin noun?

In LLPSI, I have seen Latin be Latina, Latinum, and Latinae. What are the differences of these words and how do I determine which to use?
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1 answer
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Difference between "Ubi est subject" and "Subject ubi est"?

In LLPSI, there is this line: Ubi est Nilus? Nilus in Africa est. Rhenus ubi est? Rhenus est in Germania. In both questions, the wording changed around, as did in the answers. Does this wording ...
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5 votes
2 answers
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Advenit versus Venit

In Cap. VII of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces Advenit with the following sentence Ecce Iulius ad villam advenit. It's curious to me that the verb includes the preposition; why not just use venit alone ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Lists of words to memorize before reading Lingua Latina Per Se Ilustrata classified by type: nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc

I read that a good way to use LLPSI is by memorizing lists of words before going to the text. Does anyone know where these word list are?
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5 votes
1 answer
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Found eius but pēius in the same text: is it some kind of mistake?

While I was reading Lingua Latina per se Illustrata - Familia Romana, I noted something: the vocabulary list has ĕius but pēius, is that by accident? Also I noted meī as mēī in line 92 of chapter 25, ...
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5 votes
2 answers
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Understanding the use of 'eo' in a sentence from LLPSI

The usage of eo is somewhat confusing to me with this sentence: Medus prope Romam est; iam muri Romani ab eo videntur et porta Capena. The first half is easy, however the second half is confusing ...
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5 votes
1 answer
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Meaning of "Pater non hic est, sed Marcus hic est"

In Capitulum Tertia of Hans Ørberg's book LLPSI, he has the following conversation snippet taking place between a mother, Aemilia, and her children: Aemelia Quintum Interrogat: "Ubi est Iulius? Cur ...
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6 votes
1 answer
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Pronunciation style used in Hans Ørberg's Lingua Latina

In his book, Hans Ørberg uses macrons to show longer vowel sounds, but it's not clear to me if this is reconstructed, ecclesiastical, something else, or if there are even differences between those ...
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8 votes
1 answer
455 views

Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed or verb-framed?

Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed, verb-framed, both, or neither? Native English verbs of motion are said to be satellite-framed: the verb usually indicates the manner of motion and a "...
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1 vote
1 answer
271 views

Can someone help me translate the following passage in Latin into English?

Priusquam digressus est, Aeneas a rege Heleno quaesivit quae pericula sibi vitanda essent. Ille Aenean ad Phoebi templum manu duxit, deinde dixit: "Nate dea! Pauca tibi dicam, nam cetera fari ...
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6 votes
1 answer
117 views

New to Latin—why is the Present Indicative sometimes at the end, and sometimes in the middle of a sentence?

I'm working my way through Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, and I've come across something that's tripping me up when I try to write. Example: Gallia est in Europa (pardon the lack of accents); and ...
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8 votes
1 answer
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Wheelock vs Lingua Latina?

I would like to compare Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata and Wheelock's Latin. I understand that this might come down to personal preference, but I would like to know which one is a better resource for ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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Saepe eum hic vidi/videbam

Spoiler alert!! This question gives away a plot point from late in the story of Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata. If you're working your way through that book and haven't yet gotten to Chapter XXXI, ...
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6 votes
2 answers
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Why is there "is" in "... dīcitur is locus..."?

Why is there is (it) in the following phrase from Ørberg's Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, page 118? Ōstium sīve ōs flūminis dīcitur is locus quō flumen in mare īnfluit. Literally: By Ostium or ...
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6 votes
2 answers
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A range of chapters

How do you grammatically denote a range of chapters, like what I'm trying to do in this sentence? Ecce in hac pagina vox Iohannis Ørbergii capitula prima usque decima Linguae Latinae Per Se ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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Nested genitive?

I just said this to a friend: Ecce in hac pagina vox Iohannis Ørbergii capitula a primo usque ad decimum Linguae Latinae Per Se Illustratae legentis: https://sites.google.com/site/...
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11 votes
2 answers
332 views

What is the quantity of the "a" in "maxime"?

When I come across the word maxime in macronized texts, it usually lacks a macron over the first vowel. In Ørberg's Lingua Latīna series, however, in which the macrons are (from what I understand) ...
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