Questions tagged [latin-to-english-translation]

For questions about translating Latin words or phrases into English. Bulk translation requests are off-topic.

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What is Google Translate good for?

Google Translate is notoriously unreliable for Latin. However, the translations do make some amount of sense. Is there some kind of translation task involving Latin that Google Translate is relatively ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
18 votes
7 answers
5k views

What is the best "worst" translation of Latin from Google Translate?

It's well-known on this community that you can't trust any Latin translation from Google Translate. A comment about translating goatherd with Google Translate got me thinking, though. What is the most ...
16 votes
5 answers
11k views

What is the meaning of "Ex Lux", the name of Lucifer Morningstar's new bar?

I've been a fan of Mike Carey's Lucifer comic series, for its believable portrait of a fallen angel. The series spun off from Neil Gaiman's The Sandman, which established this incarnation of Lucifer ...
Gallifreyan's user avatar
16 votes
2 answers
1k views

Mathematical Latin Help

So, I'm a PhD student working on the history of algebraic number theory and algebraic geometry. To a great extent that involves me having to read copious amounts of text in German and French. Now I'd ...
StormyTeacup's user avatar
15 votes
4 answers
2k views

Proper parsing of "Ite, missa est"

In the Catholic liturgy at the dismissal, the Latin phrase used is "Ite, missa est." The usual translation for this is "Go, the Mass has ended." Can someone suggest a proper parsing of this somewhat ...
brianpck's user avatar
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15 votes
1 answer
145 views

"qua dabatur liberum aeris spatium" in a letter of Erasmus

Erasmus's letter 1756 (readable in its entirety here) describes an explosion of gunpowder in a castle at Basel. I'm having trouble understanding a five-word phrase in the letter. This is the passage: ...
TKR's user avatar
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14 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is there a word for ephemeral but meaning lasting one night?

Looking for a word like "ephemeral," which is derived from Latin "ephēmeros," meaning "lasting only a day," according to the Oxford Dictionary of English. However, I'd ...
lemonlemon's user avatar
14 votes
1 answer
2k views

Has anybody encountered this abbreviation/spelling before?

I need help transcribing the word in the red box: has anybody ever encountered this abbreviation/spelling before? Could anybody point me towards a resource that answers my question? I've looked in ...
asdf1234's user avatar
  • 141
14 votes
3 answers
3k views

How to translate "Ceteris Paribus"?

I'm studying economics, and the words ceteris paribus are often used. I know it means that one thing changes, but that the other factors stay the same. I was trying to figure out the translation ...
L. Peters's user avatar
  • 1,599
13 votes
2 answers
3k views

Translation needed for 130 years old church document

I found this record of my great grandfather in a local church in Malaysia. Today, nobody use Latin anymore in this country. I should be much grateful if someone can help my family translating this ...
Lawrence L's user avatar
13 votes
3 answers
430 views

Help with Latin translation from a 17th century ecclesiastical Latin book

The book is Panoplia Clericalis, and the passage I'm having difficulty with (which I suspect is much easier than I think) is, from page 602: De colorum mixtione, qui differunt, ex varia eorum ...
Matt Gutting's user avatar
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13 votes
3 answers
736 views

What does "quibus intemptata nites" (Odes 1.5.10–11) mean?

I'm currently reading Horace's Odes 1.5, and on lines 10–11 there's an odd construction: ...Miseri, quibus intemptata nites... Now, as far as I can tell, this literally means "Wretched people, ...
user avatar
13 votes
2 answers
2k views

What does this damaged inscription in a church say?

I've been sent the following photo of an inscription in a Unitarian church. As best I can tell, it says: Templum hoc [re]novat[u]m est […]eribus denuo et inte[g]re[?] regnante serenissimo dono ...
Draconis's user avatar
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12 votes
7 answers
3k views

What does "Vivos voco pedibus ioco" mean?

I am not familiar with Latin, but I found an engraving on a bench at the graveyard, that made me curious. It says, vivos voco pedibus ioco. Google Translate is not really helpful, as it ...
walker18's user avatar
  • 121
12 votes
5 answers
331 views

Are there official Latin translators?

A colleague had this problem recently: A degree certificate from their home university was issued in Latin, but they need it in English or Finnish for the purpose of a grant application. Apparently no ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
12 votes
1 answer
561 views

Help translating phrase from William Lilly's Christian Astrology

So I just started reading through William Lilly's 1647 work Christian Astrology and I came across a paragraph in Latin on p. ix of the Dedicatory Epistle that I can't seem to easily translate via ...
Nikki Cypher's user avatar
12 votes
1 answer
575 views

Translation of “in” as “and”

In one of his letters to Varro, Cicero says: “Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, deerit nihil.” I’ve found this translated as: “If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need” (...
flob6469's user avatar
  • 123
12 votes
1 answer
159 views

'Quae pars anterior quae posterior jure habeatur in toto genere non liquet': taxonomical description of Antarctissa denticulata (Ehrenberg 1844)

In one of his 1844 manuscripts, C. G. Ehrenberg described the radiolarian species Lithobotrys(?) denticulata (now known as Antarctissa denticulata) and, as it was customary at the time, did so in ...
plannapus's user avatar
  • 592
12 votes
1 answer
334 views

What does "novit in tali" mean?

I'm reading Arcadius Avellanus's translation of fairy tales (he was the last known native speaker of Latin), and I've come across this sentence: Regia Filia jocum dignata mittit ancillam cum ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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11 votes
2 answers
2k views

Does the abbreviation “ſ.” in this 1755 work mean “sine”?

For an answer on the RPG Stack, I’m trying to read some entries in Medicinisch-Chymisch und Alchemistisches Oraculum, a 1755 German work whose entries are in Latin. I’m stuck on these two entries: ...
KRyan's user avatar
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11 votes
3 answers
1k views

Parsing "quae cum audisset"

I'm having trouble parsing the phrase "quae cum audisset," which I've seen translated as "when [subject] heard" or "and when [subject] heard" in the latin vulgate. For ...
Josh's user avatar
  • 793
11 votes
3 answers
866 views

Help Translating Text Found On Oil Painting

Need help in translating this text found on an oil painting. I believe it's medieval Latin but not sure if Christophorus and Lafranchini is the first and last name or two different people. Any help ...
John B's user avatar
  • 111
11 votes
3 answers
3k views

Origin of "seize the day" as a translation of Horace's carpe diem

Even many people who have never studied Latin know the phrase carpe diem (from Horace's Odes 1.11), and can tell you that it means "seize the day". But "seize" is not a very close translation of ...
TKR's user avatar
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11 votes
2 answers
2k views

Tantum religio potuit suadere malorum – Lucretius

I saw this quote in someone's forum sig file (signature): "Tantum religio potuit suadere malorum." - Lucretius Curious, I consulted Google Translate, which my professional translator brother cautions ...
Mark D Worthen PsyD's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
1k views

What's the difference between mutantur and mutamur?

A quote by John Owen: Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis. I was wondering if you could tell me the difference between mutantur and mutamur?
GoodluckH's user avatar
  • 113
11 votes
1 answer
192 views

What does "Hæc igitur illico non ingratanter Christianis patuit" mean?

I came across this phrase in Historia Hierosolymitana by Baldricus Dolensis (c. 1050–1130): What does these two sentences mean? I would appreciate any help. Hæc igitur illico non ingratanter ...
turuncu's user avatar
  • 833
10 votes
3 answers
729 views

A Latin text with dependency tree

I am looking for a Latin text that has word by word English translation and explanation. I mean after the translation, it explains that this word has ablative case and that has nominative or this verb ...
Ali Nikzad's user avatar
  • 1,567
10 votes
2 answers
3k views

Meaning of "SEVERA INDEOVI VAS" from 3rd Century slab

Can someone explain the meaning of the words "SEVERA INDEOVI VAS" on this slab: According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depiction_of_Jesus, the above image is of an "Incised sarcophagus slab with ...
Sacha T Red's user avatar
10 votes
2 answers
336 views

Potentially Ambiguous Subject for a Verb in the Aeneid

Lines 405–407 of Vergil's Aeneid, Book 6, are as follows: Si te nulla movet tantae pietatis imago, at ramum hunc" (aperit ramum qui veste latebat) "agnoscas." Tumida ex ira tum corda ...
Sapphira's user avatar
  • 2,103
10 votes
2 answers
4k views

Dominus illuminatio mea

I am trying to understand this expression. According to Wikipedia, it is translated as "The Lord is my light". Before reading this article, I thought this meant "Lord illuminate me", perhaps in ...
luchonacho's user avatar
  • 12.4k
10 votes
3 answers
512 views

Is it gibberish, a real ceremony, or a Latin joke?

I have just been watching an old TV series called Porterhouse Blue which is a Tom Sharpe comedy about an ultra-conservative and old fashioned university called Porterhouse. At one point there is a ...
Slarty's user avatar
  • 315
10 votes
2 answers
625 views

"Non possunt dari" translation

Please could someone explain what I am missing here? In Spinoza's The Ethics, Proposition V is said: PROPOSITIO V: In rerum natura non possunt dari duæ aut plures substantiæ ejusdem naturæ sive ...
Aili J.'s user avatar
  • 1,169
10 votes
1 answer
204 views

Allecto's cerulean hair in *Æneid* VII.346-7

In VII.346-7 of the Æneid, when Juno sics Allecto on Amata, we have Hic dea cæruleís únum dé crínibus anguem Conjicit inque sinum præcordia ad intima subdit. Allecto's … blue hair? Hunh?...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.5k
10 votes
2 answers
417 views

How should "porta itineri longissima" be interpreted?

According to a comment by @SebastianKoppehel, the interpretation of porta itineri as "the gate to the journey" seems questionable. Wiktionary, for example, has the following translation: ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
10 votes
2 answers
347 views

What does "illos" refer to in this passage from Seneca?

While researching an answer for this question, I came across the following passage from Seneca. The bolded part, particularly "illos", left me with some doubts about the sentence syntax: Et quid ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.7k
10 votes
1 answer
765 views

Translation of "...quae parvas aves capit et est."

I was reading Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata to practice my fluency of understanding simple sentences. In the tenth chapter, Bestiae et Homines (page 69), I came across a description of eagles. ...
Middle School Historian's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
332 views

Translation: «impulsi sunt et ipsi Christi amore»

I’ve yet another question on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC). (I did find another instance of the gerundive—I believe with a preceding ad indicating purpose—and Cerebrus’ instruction ...
Der Übermensch's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
134 views

Rupes Recta, The Straight Wall, Correct Translation

Rupes recta is the name given to a feature on the Moon. This feature is also known as the straight wall or straight cliff. Is rupes recta the correct Latin phrase for straight wall or straight cliff? ...
KeithSmith's user avatar
10 votes
3 answers
60k views

Is my interpretation of "Ad Astra per Aspera" correct?

I came across the phrase ad astra per aspera — "to the stars through difficulties." I think I know what it means, but my interpretation appears to be at odds with others. For example: The ...
faustus's user avatar
  • 253
10 votes
1 answer
670 views

Translation of building inscription regarding architect of Alcantara Bridge

The Alcantara Bridge in the Extremadura region of Spain is one of the oldest structures extant whose architect is known by name. It spans the Tagus River near the modern-day border of Spain and ...
njuffa's user avatar
  • 478
10 votes
1 answer
246 views

How much larger are Latin texts translated into English?

Judging by number of words, how much translation from Latin to English grow in size? Naturally, this would depend on the text (and the translator), but I imagine there might be some form of range or ...
luchonacho's user avatar
  • 12.4k
10 votes
1 answer
268 views

How to understand 'quae prosum sola nocendo'?

There is a line in Ovid's Metamorphoses II 519, which I don't understand at all (Juno's complaint) 'quaeritis, aetheriis quare regina deorum sedibus huc adsim? pro me tenet altera caelum! ...
Aili J.'s user avatar
  • 1,169
10 votes
3 answers
257 views

Questions on reading the prologue of Aesopus Latinus via LLPSI

Duplex libelli dos est: quod risum movet  et quod prudenti vitam consilio monet. Calumniari si quis autem voluerit  quod arbores loquantur, non tantum ferae, ... (Line 3~6) Dos is explained as a ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
514 views

edere panem vs. comedere panem

Consider the following minimal pair: edere panem 'to eat (the) bread' comedere panem 'to eat up the bread' When a resultative prefix is present (e.g. com- in comedere), panem is necessarily understood ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,901
9 votes
4 answers
982 views

Can "illa" be used to mean "there?"

Dīxit, et potentem hastam magnīs vīribus manūs sinistrae in uterum equī iēcit; stetit illa, tremēns. Does stetit illa refer to the spear? As in "it stands there?" Is illa capable of carrying that ...
Nickimite's user avatar
  • 2,953
9 votes
2 answers
814 views

How do you translate the phrase "regnum obtinuerat"?

I'm reading Jason and the Argonauts from Fabulae Faciles, and I come across this phrase really often. I'll provide an example. Erant olim in Thessalia duo fratres, quorum alter Aeson, Pelias alter ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12k
9 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why is it "id est" instead of "illud est" if it often means "that is"?

If "i.e." or "id est" is often used to say "that is...", why do we use "id" instead of "illud"? Doesn't "id est" translate to "it is&...
Alexa's user avatar
  • 91
9 votes
1 answer
1k views

What does "tom. i." mean?

I'm seeing the following abbreviation in several book/manuscript citations, particularly in religious works, but I have no idea what the abbreviation means. From the context of where I'm finding it, I'...
Emily Jacobson's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
324 views

Translation of a passage related to the crusades

I am a historian, and I came across a text from Bauldric of Dol, a medieval historian. This text is about the crusades. I have been unable to translate the following passage. Could someone here help ...
turuncu's user avatar
  • 833
9 votes
1 answer
261 views

What's the best way to translate "de Hercule famam acceperat"?

I'm translating the text: Pluto, qui de Hercule famam acceperat, eum benigne excepit (Fabulae Faciles, 53) I chose to translate it as "Pluto, who had heard stories about Hercules, received ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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