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Questions tagged [italian]

For questions related to Italian. Questions solely about Italian are off-topic, but relations between Italian and Latin are on-topic.

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If the city name Napoli comes from Ancient Greek "Nea Polis" (new town), why isn't it called "Gnapoli" instead?

If the city name Napoli comes from Ancient Greek "Nea Polis" (new town), why isn't it called "Gnapoli" instead? Why wasn't the 'n' at the beginning yotated by the following 'e'?
FlatAssembler's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
232 views

What is the correct Italian Latin pronunciation of "projicias" and "sacrificium"?

When singing Italian music of the 17th century that sets Latin texts, we use an Italian Latin pronunciation. If "projicias" and "sacrificium" were Italian words, then we would not ...
Elizabeth Anderson's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
226 views

Did Classical Latin sound like singing at times like Italian does?

Plesae note that this question is different from a previous question of mine! Songs being sung in Classical Latin literature Did Classical Latin sound like singing at times and if so did Classical ...
Ana Maria's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
135 views

Is the Italian town Empoli from Greek ἐμπολή, "merchandise?"

Is the italian town-name "Empoli" related to the greek word "ἐμπολή", meaning merchandise, or gain from merchandise? I met "εμπολή" in the form of "ἐξεμπολημένων&...
exp8j's user avatar
  • 285
2 votes
1 answer
205 views

Pronunciation of intervocalic EV in Greek words in Roman Ecclesiastical

For example evangelium, which in Greek, and hence in Classical, has an ambisyllabic1 [w:], giving [ɛw:a]. How are this and similar words pronounced in (preferrably sung) Roman Ecclesiastical? Is it as ...
Unbrutal_Russian's user avatar
8 votes
4 answers
2k views

How close is modern Italian pronunciation of sounds to Ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation?

I know that Ecclesiastical Latin uses Italianate pronunciation. My question is if there are any significant differences between pronunciation of modern Italian sounds vs. pronunciation of ...
Humile Vivarium's user avatar
9 votes
0 answers
737 views

When did "si" become the standard word for "yes" in the Italian peninsula?

I am aware that classical Latin did not have words for "yes" and "no" in the same sense that English does. I know that they could express the idea of "yes" by either ...
David's user avatar
  • 191
7 votes
1 answer
815 views

Va, pensiero, sull'ali dorate – in Latin?

How would one translate the Italian phrase Va, pensiero, sull'ali dorate into Latin? It is the first row from a chorus in Verdi's opera Nabucco. In English, the phrase means: Go, thoughts, on wings ...
a20's user avatar
  • 233
3 votes
1 answer
285 views

¿Was "grosso modo" popularised from Latin or Italian?

Grosso modo is a phrase of Latin origin, meaning "approximately". The phrase has been adopted in many languages (like English, French, Dutch, etc), as the referred link testifies. The ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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9 votes
1 answer
852 views

A poem that works in both Latin and Italian

Years ago an old colleague showed me a poem which had a miraculous feature: it was perfectly valid Latin and perfectly valid Italian. With clever choices of words one can make that happen, but it also ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

Was there ever a difference between 'volo' and 'volo'?

The words "I want" and "I fly" are both volō. Was there ever any difference in pronunciation in the classical era or later? I expect such differences to be more likely in vulgar Latin. The rest ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
649 views

Is the palatalization of "d" between "a", "i" or "o" and "ie" or "iu" only a Medieval Latin phenomenon?

In Italian and the other Romance languages, the palatalization especially concerns "c" and "g" before "e" or "i". But some words in Italian (or early Italian in the case of meriggio) show the same for ...
Vincenzo Oliva's user avatar
17 votes
2 answers
2k views

How do we know that Italian words come from accusatives, not ablatives?

I have been told by several sources that Italian nouns and adjectives that originate from Latin come from accusative forms. Also the final -m is lost and an u becomes o. For example, caro > carnem > ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
140 views

How to translate "pesto"?

What would be a good Latin translation for the sauce pesto? I see a couple of possible routes, but it's not clear to me at all what I should call the sauce in a modern context: It seems to come from ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
416 views

How to translate piazza?

I am looking for a Latin translation of the Italian word "piazza". Specifically, I would like to have a Latin word to describe the various piazze in today's Rome. I have found a couple of ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
845 views

Hushing with a finger gesture

I was reading Dante's Divine Comedy, and this verse caught my attention (Hell 25.45 with my translation): mi puosi 'l dito su dal mento al naso I put my finger up from my chin to my nose This is ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
879 views

Do we know which Latin word the Italian term "andante" comes from?

Wiktionary says that the Italian verb "andare" might come from suppletion of "vadere" with another Latin verb. But it goes on to say that another possibility is the dissimilation of "ambulare". I ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12.1k
16 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the first text considered Italian instead of Latin?

What is the earliest text that is considered to be written in Italian (or a predecessor thereof), and what distinguishes it from Latin? I would like to understand the first signs of Latin evolving ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
504 views

Gemination after stressed vowel

Sometimes I hear people geminate consonants after stressed vowels in speech. For example, amāta might be pronounced as amātta. I have not heard enough to tell if this gemination is ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
144 views

Gender and number in medieval composite active perfect

I am not sure of correct terminology, but let me call the medieval perfect tenses like amatum habeo — as opposed to the classical amavi — the "composite active perfect". One would expect ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
299 views

Generic use of Italian "fare": analogue in Latin?

The Italian word "fare" is often used in a very generic way. English doesn't use "do" or "make" that much, but it can still be a good comparison. Let me give some examples. We may say "fare Greco" ("...
MickG's user avatar
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