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Questions tagged [interrogative]

For questions about interrogative words, such as 'quis' (who), 'cur' (why), and 'quando' (when).

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4
votes
1answer
61 views

“Any thoughts” in Latin

How would one translate "any thoughts?" into Latin? It is an ellipse for "does anyone have any thoughts?" I would think "ullas cogitationes?" for "Aliquis ullas cogitationes habet?"
7
votes
3answers
250 views

Is this a question or an affirmation?

Reading the Digest (6th century, copy of 9th century), I find this sentence: Sed si plures servum percusserint, utrum omnes quasi occiderint teneantur videamus. One author who established the text ...
3
votes
1answer
154 views

Declension case in “Quo vadis?” sentence

Normally we use accusative to express the destination of the movement in Latin. Why then is the ablative form of interrogative pronoun (ie. "quo") used in the "Quo vadis?" sentence? When we answer ...
5
votes
2answers
412 views

How would you say, “How long have you been a X?”

I want to say in Latin, "How long have you been a dog? I have been a dog four or five years now." But how do I form the interrogative phrase, "How long?" My first inclination was to use the phrase "...
9
votes
1answer
2k views

Where to put the enclitic -ne?

The enclitic particle -ne can be used to form a binary (yes/no) question. I would like to know how attaching it to different words changes the meaning of the question. I have a clear idea of how it ...
6
votes
2answers
177 views

Composing a question with hortari and an ut-clause

When I was composing this question yesterday, I wanted to ask this: Which words would you suggest me to use? I wanted to do it using hortari and an ut-clause. I was looking for a question form of ...
10
votes
2answers
241 views

How do I express total surprise or perplexity when asking a question?

Are there conventional expressions in Latin to strengthen the question, showing total surprise or perplexity? How do you say, for example, "What the heck...?" or "Why on earth...?" in Latin?
7
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the relationship between “cuius” and “quoius”

In most Latin grammars, cuius is introduced as the genitive of qui (relative pronoun) or quis (interrogative): Cuius soror es? — Whose sister are you? Marcus, cuius pater sum, miles est. &...
8
votes
1answer
238 views

When can *quis* be used as an adjective interrogative pronoun?

The interrogative pronouns quis and quī have me rather confused. I understand that quis is generally substantive, while quī is generally adjective. But Allen and Greenough (§148) indicate that quis ...