Questions tagged [interrogative]

For questions about interrogative words, such as 'quis' (who), 'cur' (why), and 'quando' (when).

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5
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1answer
108 views

How do you ask "How + adjective" questions in Latin, such as "how big is your house?", "how large was Caesar's army"?

Many students who want to practice spoken Latin come up with questions starting with "How + adjective": how large? how big? how important?. Is there a short way to ask those questions or is ...
1
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1answer
47 views

Use of the subjunctive in answering questions

I am working through some lessons and the guide has the following exchanges: Velisne libum? Velim. Visne libum? Volo. So the guide seems to be expecting that if the question is put in the optative ...
-2
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1answer
99 views

What is the difference for these words for "which"?

There are three main choices for expressing the idea of "which" in Latin: qui quinam quisnam How do you choose which one to use in which situation? So, I am asking both for interrogatives ...
8
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2answers
839 views

Why would an interrogative pronoun be in the genitive (other than meaning "whose")?

I am doing some Rosetta Stone and the phrase is: Cuius magnitudinis libo eges? The meaning is apparently supposed to be "What size cake do you need?" There are other similar interrogatives ...
0
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1answer
127 views

What is the difference between uti and quare?

Uti and quare seem to have similar meanings, (how? or in what manner?) Is there a difference between the two words? What situations would they be used in that would differ?
6
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1answer
81 views

What is the grammar of ‘quid illud quod’ in Ambrose De. ob. Val. 35?

Introduction and question Ambrose is generally not too hard to read; his structure is pretty straight forward, his word-choice is not too weird, and he seems to have favoured a style which would be ...
6
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1answer
421 views

How does "quid causae" work grammatically?

I do not understand the grammar of quid causae = "[for] what cause", as in Nescio quid causae fuerit, cur nullas ad me litteras dares I do not know what the reason was why you sent me no ...
8
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1answer
251 views

Constituendi autem sunt qui sint in amicitia fines et quasi termini diligendi (Cic. Amic. 56)

I was wondering to what extent the agreement pattern exemplified with the following sentences drawn from Cicero's De Amicitia can be regarded as the most natural one. I'm asking this question since, ...
7
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2answers
350 views

Interrogative pronouns about animals (Quis aut quid)

If I want to ask the question about the dog, whose name is Cerberus should I ask Quis est Cerberus? or Quid est Cerberus? Do we use quis or quae (according to gender) about animals or quid? What ...
8
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1answer
245 views

Quem or quid when asking what something is buying?

I am not sure whether to say "Quem emit Iulius?" or "Quid emit Iulius?" if I want to know what Julius is buying. I know the interrogative pronoun should be in the accusative case ...
10
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1answer
887 views

How to translate "what" when used as an ironic interjection

Is there any good way to translate "what" when used as an ironic interjection, e.g. "What? He thought that would be a good idea?" said in a sarcastic tone? My first thought is just to use quis or quid ...
9
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2answers
1k views

When can "qui" mean "how"?

From brianpck's comment on another answer: "qui" quite often means "how" in Plautus This took me by surprise, since I'd never seen that use before. In what contexts can quī mean "how"? And where ...
1
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1answer
317 views

About the difference between the enclitic "ne" and the non-enclitic "ne"

So, I know that -ne is an enclitic to express a yes/no question. But, the "Ne", as a non-enclitic, as I understood it, could also be a word question. In "Ne....annon" or "Ne....necne" Meaning Is it....
6
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3answers
407 views

Confused about the use of "quae" as an interrogative word

Sometimes, I read that "quae" could be used, not only as a relative word, but also as an interrogative word. Sometimes I read that it's not like that in the correct usage. Quote, from a fellow Latin ...
6
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1answer
159 views

In which cases the enclitic -ne is optional, and and in which is it mandatory?

As I get it, -ne is used to play the role of a question word when there's no question word, and of course, when it's a yes-no question. But is it good practice to omit it in such questions? Is it a ...
4
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1answer
177 views

"Any thoughts" in Latin

How would one translate "any thoughts?" into Latin? It is an ellipse for "does anyone have any thoughts?" I would think "ullas cogitationes?" for "Aliquis ullas cogitationes habet?"
7
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3answers
280 views

Is this a question or an affirmation?

Reading the Digest (6th century, copy of 9th century), I find this sentence: Sed si plures servum percusserint, utrum omnes quasi occiderint teneantur videamus. One author who established the text ...
3
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1answer
256 views

Declension case in "Quo vadis?" sentence

Normally we use accusative to express the destination of the movement in Latin. Why then is the ablative form of interrogative pronoun (ie. "quo") used in the "Quo vadis?" sentence? When we answer ...
5
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2answers
541 views

How would you say, "How long have you been a X?"

I want to say in Latin, "How long have you been a dog? I have been a dog four or five years now." But how do I form the interrogative phrase, "How long?" My first inclination was to use the phrase "...
11
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1answer
4k views

Where to put the enclitic -ne?

The enclitic particle -ne can be used to form a binary (yes/no) question. I would like to know how attaching it to different words changes the meaning of the question. I have a clear idea of how it ...
6
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2answers
222 views

Composing a question with hortari and an ut-clause

When I was composing this question yesterday, I wanted to ask this: Which words would you suggest me to use? I wanted to do it using hortari and an ut-clause. I was looking for a question form of ...
12
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3answers
333 views

How do I express total surprise or perplexity when asking a question?

Are there conventional expressions in Latin to strengthen the question, showing total surprise or perplexity? How do you say, for example, "What the heck...?" or "Why on earth...?" in Latin?
8
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1answer
2k views

What is the relationship between "cuius" and "quoius"

In most Latin grammars, cuius is introduced as the genitive of qui (relative pronoun) or quis (interrogative): Cuius soror es? — Whose sister are you? Marcus, cuius pater sum, miles est. — Mark, ...
9
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1answer
322 views

When can *quis* be used as an adjective interrogative pronoun?

The interrogative pronouns quis and quī have me rather confused. I understand that quis is generally substantive, while quī is generally adjective. But Allen and Greenough (§148) indicate that quis ...