Questions tagged [imperative]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4
votes
1answer
82 views

Use of passive imperative of transitive verbs

I am so happy to have found this community. I have 2 imperative sentences: Fenestram aperīre and Fenestram aperī I wonder if the passive form is correct and how could be translated into English or ...
7
votes
1answer
410 views

Is "Noli illud dixisse!" good Latin for "You should not have said that!"?

I am trying to understand how the perfect imperative functioned in Latin. Is "Noli illud dixisse!" good Latin for "You should not have said that!"? I know "Noli illud dicere!&...
9
votes
0answers
84 views

Coordinating positive and negative imperatives

For positive commands, Latin uses the imperative: Da mihi librum "Give me the book." For negative commands, it uses a number of constructions of which noli + inf. is most common: Noli mihi ...
5
votes
2answers
134 views

Do imperative verbs usually go first or does it still follow the regular SOV order?

In this example, what would make more sense: MITTE MIHI PICTURAM PRODUCTI or PICTURAM PRODUCTI MIHI MITTE
8
votes
2answers
898 views

Ave for plural addressee?

I have been told that the greeting ave or have is of Punic origin and not an imperative of avere. If so, how do I use this word to greet several people? Is it in the same form, is it pluralized to (h)...
8
votes
2answers
323 views

Are the present and future imperative used together?

Both the usual present imperative (e.g. fac) and the future imperative (e.g. facito) are attested. But are they ever used together so that the tenses are contrasted? In terms of a concrete example, ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Is "mihi audi!" incorrect?

I'm currently doing Latin in high school, and there's one thing which I can't get my head around in a recent test I got back. I translated the command "Listen to me!" as "mihi audi!&...
8
votes
2answers
827 views

Latin translation of "don't get caught"

I am looking for a translation of "don't get caught". This phrase is the slogan of World Chase Tag (a tag competition), and it seems like they tried to put a Latin translation on their ...
4
votes
1answer
165 views

Future Imperative of Deponents: 3 or 4 existing forms?

For most verbs there are 4 future imperative forms, right? Here an example: But now I did research on deponents and found following table: Now my question is if there are really only 3 forms of the ...
4
votes
2answers
177 views

Translating Gollum's "Go away and never come back!"

One of the more memorable scenes in the Lord of the Ring's movies is the moment when Gollum's two personalities argue with each other, and finally one of his selves orders the other, "Go away and ...
6
votes
1answer
510 views

Imperative of sum - es or esto?

The imperatives of sum/esse (to be) are sg. es/esto and pl. este. When do we use es? And when esto?
6
votes
1answer
259 views

Irregular aorist imperative from ἔχω

Why does ἔχω exhibit a 2 s. aorist imperative σχές instead of what I would expect to be σχέ ? Do other verbs do this, or is this peculiar to this verb?
6
votes
1answer
565 views

Forming first-person plural imperatives

Sorry for the simple question, but I last took Latin in 1987 and I don't remember how to make a first-person plural imperative for "cogitare" (or any "are" verbs), and my Google searches are failing ...
3
votes
0answers
105 views

Do imperatives trigger reflexive pronouns in Latin?

In English, imperative verbs have "invisible subjects": syntactically, they act like there's an invisible pronoun in the subject position. This is why we see look closely at yourself instead of *look ...
4
votes
1answer
805 views

How to say "Do not be ..." in Latin?

I want to write a motto for self-control: Don't be a slave! Google Translate translated that to: "Ne fiat servus". I do not know whether that is correct, or whether I should write "servis" insead. ...
8
votes
1answer
439 views

How to translate "Carpe That Diem" properly into Latin?

I was in a store today when I came across a notebook that said "Carpe That Diem" on the cover. How would one translate this phrase into Latin properly? At first I thought to simply translate "that" ...
5
votes
1answer
146 views

Is "nolī esse" grammatical?

In the Vatican's Nova Vulgata, Ecclesiastes 7:16-17 reads as follows: Noli esse nimis iustus neque sapiens supra modum! Cur te perdere vis? Ne agas nimis impie et noli esse stultus! Cur ...
3
votes
1answer
234 views

Fiat justitia in imperative mood?

I came across the Fiat ivstitia motto. The Wikipedia entry translates it as "Let justice be done". I need a bit of help to understand this. I know justitia is a noun (like justicia, in Spanish, or ...
4
votes
1answer
129 views

Are there classical examples of the imperative patere?

I wanted to see how the imperative patĕre of pati is used and I made a corpus search. However, most of the results seem to be polluted with the infinitive patēre, and I'm having hard time ...
7
votes
0answers
94 views

Imperative vs Hortatory Subjunctive [duplicate]

According to this, Subjunctive can be used to express "an exhortation or a command". When should Hortatory Subjunctive be used and when Imperative is favoured? What is the difference in meaning?
13
votes
2answers
443 views

Why is Imperative used here in Alexander Lenard's translation of Winnie the Pooh?

Currently doing some beginner practice with Alexander Lenard's translation of Winnie the Pooh. It says, "Ecce Eduardus Ursus scalis nunc tump-tump-tump occipite gradus pulsante post Christophorum ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

What does "noli" really mean?

I understand nolle to be short for non volle, i.e. "not to wish/want". I thought noli was the imperative form of this: non vo—er, wait a minute, volo has no imperative! So, what's noli? The usual ...
4
votes
1answer
316 views

Primum non culpare?

I was thinking of how you could alter the medical dictum Primum non nocere to mean "First, CYA." My first thought: Primum non culpare, which I would literally translate as "First, don't get blamed." ...
4
votes
1answer
392 views

Is there any connection between "ave" (as in Ave Cesar) and "aveo"?

Ave, as in Ave Caesar, has the meaning of "hail". Yet, according to Wiktionary, it is also the "second-person singular present imperative of aveō". Now, aveō is a verb which means either "I desire", ...
8
votes
3answers
183 views

How to order someone to want something?

I asked yesterday about the imperative of velle, and it turned out that does not really have an imperative. If the most obvious option is not available, how should I give an order to want? A phrase or ...
11
votes
1answer
994 views

What is the imperative of velle?

The conjugation tables of irregular Latin verbs that I have seen do not give any imperative forms for the verb velle. The verb nolle has the imperative forms noli and nolite, and they are fairly ...
6
votes
1answer
147 views

Are there other perfect imperatives than memento?

I learned from this previous question about the semantics of memento(te) that memento(te) is not morphologically a future imperative. It turned to be a perfect imperative (semantically present), as it ...
7
votes
1answer
521 views

Is memento(te) semantically a future imperative?

The verb meminisse is irregular. It has only the active perfect system (memini, meministi, meminit…) and the imperatives memento and mementote. These imperatives are future imperatives by form, ...
9
votes
1answer
209 views

Negative Future Imperatives

In reading through Book VI of Vergil's Aeneid, I came across the following line: 851 tu regere imperio populos, Romane, memento I believe this is translated as "you, Roman, remember to rule the ...
5
votes
2answers
423 views

Why is there an exception when forming 3rd conjugation imperatives?

All of the affirmative singular imperatives of regular verbs are formed by dropping the -re from the second principal part. Why is it that, in the 3rd conjugation only, the affirmative plural ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Imperatives of derivatives of facere, dicere and ducere

Three verbs are well known to have an irregular short imperative: fac, dic, duc. Do the imperatives remain short in the presence of a prefix? For example, which ones are correct out of effic/effac/...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

Libera te tutemet ex inferis vs. Libera temet [ipsum] ab inferis?

In a movie (Event Horizon, spoilers ahead), you have this Latin phrase they think they heard and what it ends up being : Liberate me... Libera te tutemet (ex inferis). There's always the ...
8
votes
2answers
927 views

How to say "Don't even..."?

The following constructions feel simple enough: "You don't even move." — Ne moveris quidem. "Don't move!" — Noli moveri! or "Ne motus sis." But what if I want to give a negative ...
9
votes
2answers
418 views

The difference between coniunctivus and imperativus when expressing commands

What is the rule for choosing coniunctivus or imperativus when expressing commands? I know, that imperativus has only second person forms, so one is forced to use coniunctivus for other persons. Are ...