Questions tagged [idiom]

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0answers
80 views

Attempting to preemptively disqualify retort

If I were to say: The sky is falling! It undeniably false to claim that I am overreacting, as my detractors are sure to do. Is there a common Latin phrase that encapsulates that, the tactic or ...
4
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1answer
159 views

A correct title for the book from the Evil Dead movies?

In the Evil Dead movies the infamous book is given an inconsistently spelled name, which vanished in the other installments. The scripts for the original movie and the remake titled it "Naturan ...
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2answers
286 views

Is there a colorful term for an uninvited guest?

Is there a colorful Latin term for an uninvited guest? Of course I can say something like conviva non invitatus, but I wonder if there is something less boring, akin to the English "gatecrasher" or ...
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1answer
95 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “solitō māiōre”?

A fellow member of a Latin Discord server I participate in posted this link to an article with a question regarding how one would interpret the phrase "solitō māiōre". Despite our efforts to interpret ...
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3answers
38k views

Is my interpretation of “Ad Astra per Aspera” correct?

I came across the phrase ad astra per aspera — "to the stars through difficulties." I think I know what it means, but my interpretation appears to be at odds with others. For example: The ...
5
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1answer
253 views

Can someone suggest a medical name conveying “idiopathic unfulfilled potential”?

The diagnosis of ADHD is effectively a clinical opinion that an individual is not reaching their full potential. It's also a claim about the underlying mechanism (being mediated by dopamine; a ...
2
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0answers
68 views

What is “cold war”?

How should I translate "cold war" in Latin? I can see two ways to approach this, using a classical phrase for a similar hostile political situation, or finding a suitable adjective for "cold" to go ...
5
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1answer
3k views

How to parse “Dis Manibus” syntactically?

Almost everyone who has ever seen a Roman grave inscription has seen the phrase Dis Manibus or its abbreviation DM. It starts almost every Roman tombstone I have seen. I know it means "to/for the ...
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1answer
63 views

Parsing pro rata temporis

Recently when reading some material related to research grants, I came across the Latin phrase pro rata temporis in English text. It was easy enough to understand in the context. For example, a 600&...
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1answer
171 views

How to say that it rains on something?

How can I say in Latin that it is raining on something? I can find ways around like pluvia rem tingit, but I would like something more literally "it rains on something" than "the rain makes something ...
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1answer
4k views

How do I welcome someone in Latin?

When someone comes to visit me at my villa, I would like to greet them and welcome them in. I know how to welcome English ("welcome"), German ("wilkommen"), and French ("bienvenue") guests in a single ...
3
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1answer
60 views

How to say by/on the basis of?

In mathematics, the following phrase is common: By Theorem 5.6, the function is differentiable. How do I say 'by' in Latin? I don't think 'ab' is appropriate to use here. One way is to put '...
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3answers
79 views

Is there a Latin idiom for a set date for an event?

Suppose I have a meeting, a court hearing, or any event that is set by some authority at a specific time in the future. Is there a word for such a "due date"? I don't mean a deadline (see the separate ...
5
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1answer
66 views

Latin for “worth a hundred times its weight in gold”

I'm trying to figure out how to say something is "worth a hundred times its weight in gold" in Latin, and everything I come up with feels cumbersome, unLatinate, and unclear. Hoc textīle centuplex ...
7
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1answer
871 views

Meaning of “quod si”

I'm having trouble with quod sī. L&S offers, under the definition of quod, With other particles, as si, nisi, utinam, ubi, etc., always with reference to something which precedes (very freq.), ...
6
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1answer
147 views

What would be a “lark” or “early bird” in Latin

Inspired by this question What would be a "night owl" in Latin? and its excellent answers, I's like to know about the antonym of a "night owl": What would be a "lark" or "early bird"? I was ...
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4answers
3k views

How do I address an email in Latin to my Latin professor?

How do I address an email in Latin to my Latin professor? How is the greeting supposed to look?
4
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1answer
167 views

(Loose) Translation of “seize the loyal”

I'm considering getting a tattoo with the phrase "Seize the loyal" in Latin, but I'm not 100% how to translate it. I am trying to get at something like "keep the loyal close" but it can be a very ...
3
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1answer
269 views

With which verb can I park a car?

What would be a good Latin translation for the verb "to park"? I mean contexts like "I parked my car in front of his house". I would prefer to have a classically attested verb, so my main question is ...
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4answers
4k views

What would be a “night owl” in Latin?

On the recommendation of an esteemed Finnish member of our forum, I decided to ask how one would translate "night owl" into Latin. night owl (noun) a person who keeps late hours at night I ...
3
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1answer
88 views

How do you show something from a window?

Suppose, for example, that a child is watching his dad come home from work. She can't wait any longer to show what she's got, so she goes to the window and shows her new teddy bear to her dad. How can ...
4
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2answers
231 views

Quōmodo v. Quā ratiōne

I'm looking at a Latin translation of the Apology of Socrates by Marcellus Ficinus and I'm puzzled by the very first clause. Quā vōs quidem ratiōne, Ō virī Athēniēnsēs, affēcerint accūsātōrēs meī, ...
4
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1answer
364 views

How to say 'For a [period of time]'

How would I say that something won't end for a period of time, for example: Dinner isn't over for another hour. I considered Cena non finet ante hora, but that didn't quite sound right. Update: I'm ...
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2answers
758 views

Walking “hand in hand”

How can I translate the sentence "We are walking hand in hand" in Latin? I am not sure how to render "hand in hand". A direct translation would be Ambulamus manus in manu. But can I use a nominative ...
5
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1answer
125 views

“On the run” in Latin

Is there a Latin equivalent to the English phrase "on the run" to indicate someone who's avoiding capture/recapture? For example, "The prisoner is on the run." Would something like in fuga be ...
4
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1answer
98 views

Does Latin have an animal-based term for “coward,” like “scaredy-cat” in English?

In English, a lowbrow way to call someone a coward is to call him or her a "scaredy-cat" or "fraidy-cat." Apparently, somewhere along the way cats got a reputation for being easily frightened. ...
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4answers
28k views

What is the Latin equivalent of “Ever Forward” as a motto?

In the workplace environment, I don’t think it is productive to dwell on what happened or keep score on who did what to whom. In English I would summarize my motto as: Ever Forward Now I am ...
3
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3answers
117 views

Is there a more emphatic version of posse?

If I want to say "I can" in Latin, I will usually use posse. But what if I want something stronger and more emphatic, like "I am capable of", "I am able to", or similar? I am not aware of a Latin ...
3
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1answer
208 views

(Heart) White/Bright and Absit Invidia

I want to engrave a Latin phrase on a necklace for a family friend with the surname Whiteheart. I'm came up with "A Heart White/Bright and Without Malice", which in Latin I'm thinking might be ...
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3answers
1k views

Peace and Good Will in Latin

I want to engrave "Peace and Good Will" on my ring in Latin. I have less then a quarter available for the engraving so it can't be too big. I originally wanted to use something from the Bible (even ...
4
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1answer
51 views

Mistaking something for something

How do I phrase "mistaking something for something" idiomatically in Latin? There is always a way around if one wants to explain (eg. "I mistook the cat for a dog" > Felem canem esse falso putabam), ...
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2answers
440 views

How to translate “continued” into Latin when referring to pages in a book?

I'm formatting some letters we're reading this semester in my Latin class in Word so I have more space to annotate. I need to keep track of which text in my Word doc is on which page of the book the ...
8
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1answer
885 views

Is there a Latin equivalent for “All talk but no action”?

There was a discussion about the phrase "Blowing your own trumpet" which according to some means same. But when translated to Latin idioms it steered more towards just being "too proud" or "praising ...
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3answers
1k views

Are there Latin words for hair color?

English words like "brunette", "blonde", and "redhead" refer to people of a particular hair color. Are there similar words in Latin? It is easy to express hair color in English or Latin with several ...
4
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1answer
2k views

What is the opposite of “aegrescit medendo”?

There is a well-known Latin phrase, aegrescit medendo, which means, "worsens with treatment". I believe it comes from Virgil (correct me if I am wrong). I wanted to know if there is an attested phrase ...
7
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2answers
114 views

How to distinguish Julian and Gregorian calendars in Latin?

In some contexts it is important to express whether a given date (for example October 25 and November 7 in 1917) is according to the Julian or the Gregorian calendar. Are there established Latin ...
5
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2answers
362 views

How would you say, “How beautiful!”

I am eating a hot dog in a beautiful courtyard right around dusk, and I would like to exclaim in Latin, "How beautiful!" I thought of saying "Quam pulchra!" which can't be far off, but I am wondering ...
9
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2answers
8k views

Double meaning Ex pluribus unum

Ex pluribus unum means (simplified) "From many, one", in the sense that many parts build one whole. Can I also use the phrase in the sense that from many possible solutions or things only one (the ...
7
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2answers
994 views

Two birds with one stone?

In English you kill two birds with one stone when you achieve two goals in one action. In Finnish or Dutch you get two flies in one hit. Is there a similar saying in Latin? I prefer classical Latin, ...
7
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1answer
100 views

“Nothing but seventh place is good enough”

I would like help modifying the famous phrase nil satis nisi optimum to lower expectations somewhat to "nothing but seventh place is good enough". Google Translate creates a suspicious range of ...
5
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2answers
268 views

Antonym for “de profundis”?

I'm looking to find out what the Latin for "from the heights" is, as the equivalent of Oscar Wilde's title "De Profundis".
7
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2answers
227 views

Translating “God knows how much/long” and similar

Consider these examples: Mr. Johnson has been the janitor for God knows how long. Right behind this park is the new bridge that cost God knows how much. You can replace "God knows how" ...
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3answers
4k views

Why *In medias res* and not *In media res*?

Wikipedia gives literal translation as: Into the middle of things. As far as I am aware into – in takes accusative. Plural accusative of medium seems to be media, not medias Even if I am ...
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3answers
2k views

Origin of “seize the day” as a translation of Horace's carpe diem

Even many people who have never studied Latin know the phrase carpe diem (from Horace's Odes 1.11), and can tell you that it means "seize the day". But "seize" is not a very close translation of ...
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1answer
49 views

How to “look deep into one's eyes”?

In this question, the idiom "to look deep into one's eyes" came up. While the rest of the translation was relatively straightforward, I don't know of any equivalent idiom in Greek or Latin. If I ...
4
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2answers
2k views

How would I say “I came, I saw, I kicked ass”?

I recently encountered someone in an online game who had the battlecry "Veni, vidi, calce asinum!". Now, my Latin's quite rusty, but I'm certain that can only be translated as "I came, I saw, I kicked ...
7
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1answer
232 views

Is there a Ancient Greek or Latin equivalent to “steely eyed”?

I'm looking for parallel idioms related by vocabulary and/or meaning. This is in reference to a question on Mythology regarding the "gray eyed" translation of an epithet of Athena: Why is Athena “...
6
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2answers
141 views

Looking a gift horse in the mouth

A common phrase for mistrust towards a given gift is looking a gift horse in the mouth. As explained in Wiktionary (linked above), the saying goes back to the New Testament via St. Jerome's Latin ...
6
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3answers
2k views

Is there a Latin expression to say the “exact opposite of something/someone”?

Consider the following English sentence: Clark Kent is the alter ego of Superman The latter uses a Latin expression, alter ego, meaning the "other self". Now, consider this sentence: ...
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2answers
1k views

Help your friends, harm your enemies

"Help your friends, harm your enemies." I have heard this was a motto of Roman life and foreign policy. It is the definition of justice that begins the discussion in Plato's Republic. I believe that ...

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