The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Questions tagged [idiom]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4
votes
3answers
70 views

Is there a Latin idiom for a set date for an event?

Suppose I have a meeting, a court hearing, or any event that is set by some authority at a specific time in the future. Is there a word for such a "due date"? I don't mean a deadline (see the separate ...
5
votes
1answer
42 views

Latin for “worth a hundred times its weight in gold”

I'm trying to figure out how to say something is "worth a hundred times its weight in gold" in Latin, and everything I come up with feels cumbersome, unLatinate, and unclear. Hoc textīle centuplex ...
7
votes
0answers
516 views

Meaning of “quod si”

I'm having trouble with quod sī. L&S offers, under the definition of quod, With other particles, as si, nisi, utinam, ubi, etc., always with reference to something which precedes (very freq.), ...
6
votes
1answer
124 views

What would be a “lark” or “early bird” in Latin

Inspired by this question What would be a "night owl" in Latin? and its excellent answers, I's like to know about the antonym of a "night owl": What would be a "lark" or "early bird"? I was ...
11
votes
4answers
1k views

How do I address an email in Latin to my Latin professor?

How do I address an email in Latin to my Latin professor? How is the greeting supposed to look?
4
votes
1answer
120 views

(Loose) Translation of “seize the loyal”

I'm considering getting a tattoo with the phrase "Seize the loyal" in Latin, but I'm not 100% how to translate it. I am trying to get at something like "keep the loyal close" but it can be a very ...
2
votes
1answer
205 views

With which verb can I park a car?

What would be a good Latin translation for the verb "to park"? I mean contexts like "I parked my car in front of his house". I would prefer to have a classically attested verb, so my main question is ...
14
votes
4answers
3k views

What would be a “night owl” in Latin?

On the recommendation of an esteemed Finnish member of our forum, I decided to ask how one would translate "night owl" into Latin. night owl (noun) a person who keeps late hours at night I ...
3
votes
1answer
71 views

How do you show something from a window?

Suppose, for example, that a child is watching his dad come home from work. She can't wait any longer to show what she's got, so she goes to the window and shows her new teddy bear to her dad. How can ...
4
votes
2answers
134 views

Quōmodo v. Quā ratiōne

I'm looking at a Latin translation of the Apology of Socrates by Marcellus Ficinus and I'm puzzled by the very first clause. Quā vōs quidem ratiōne, Ō virī Athēniēnsēs, affēcerint accūsātōrēs meī, ...
4
votes
1answer
184 views

How to say 'For a [period of time]'

How would I say that something won't end for a period of time, for example: Dinner isn't over for another hour. I considered Cena non finet ante hora, but that didn't quite sound right. Update: ...
6
votes
2answers
621 views

Walking “hand in hand”

How can I translate the sentence "We are walking hand in hand" in Latin? I am not sure how to render "hand in hand". A direct translation would be Ambulamus manus in manu. But can I use a nominative ...
5
votes
1answer
94 views

“On the run” in Latin

Is there a Latin equivalent to the English phrase "on the run" to indicate someone who's avoiding capture/recapture? For example, "The prisoner is on the run." Would something like in fuga be ...
4
votes
1answer
74 views

Does Latin have an animal-based term for “coward,” like “scaredy-cat” in English?

In English, a lowbrow way to call someone a coward is to call him or her a "scaredy-cat" or "fraidy-cat." Apparently, somewhere along the way cats got a reputation for being easily frightened. ...
5
votes
4answers
17k views

What is the Latin equivalent of “Ever Forward” as a motto?

In the workplace environment, I don’t think it is productive to dwell on what happened or keep score on who did what to whom. In English I would summarize my motto as: Ever Forward Now I am ...
3
votes
3answers
81 views

Is there a more emphatic version of posse?

If I want to say "I can" in Latin, I will usually use posse. But what if I want something stronger and more emphatic, like "I am capable of", "I am able to", or similar? I am not aware of a Latin ...
3
votes
1answer
152 views

(Heart) White/Bright and Absit Invidia

I want to engrave a Latin phrase on a necklace for a family friend with the surname Whiteheart. I'm came up with "A Heart White/Bright and Without Malice", which in Latin I'm thinking might be ...
6
votes
3answers
652 views

Peace and Good Will in Latin

I want to engrave "Peace and Good Will" on my ring in Latin. I have less then a quarter available for the engraving so it can't be too big. I originally wanted to use something from the Bible (even ...
4
votes
1answer
48 views

Mistaking something for something

How do I phrase "mistaking something for something" idiomatically in Latin? There is always a way around if one wants to explain (eg. "I mistook the cat for a dog" > Felem canem esse falso putabam), ...
6
votes
2answers
313 views

How to translate “continued” into Latin when referring to pages in a book?

I'm formatting some letters we're reading this semester in my Latin class in Word so I have more space to annotate. I need to keep track of which text in my Word doc is on which page of the book the ...
8
votes
1answer
787 views

Is there a Latin equivalent for “All talk but no action”?

There was a discussion about the phrase "Blowing your own trumpet" which according to some means same. But when translated to Latin idioms it steered more towards just being "too proud" or "praising ...
7
votes
2answers
613 views

Are there Latin words for hair color?

English words like "brunette", "blonde", and "redhead" refer to people of a particular hair color. Are there similar words in Latin? It is easy to express hair color in English or Latin with several ...
4
votes
1answer
907 views

What is the opposite of “aegrescit medendo”?

There is a well-known Latin phrase, aegrescit medendo, which means, "worsens with treatment". I believe it comes from Virgil (correct me if I am wrong). I wanted to know if there is an attested phrase ...
7
votes
2answers
88 views

How to distinguish Julian and Gregorian calendars in Latin?

In some contexts it is important to express whether a given date (for example October 25 and November 7 in 1917) is according to the Julian or the Gregorian calendar. Are there established Latin ...
5
votes
2answers
246 views

How would you say, “How beautiful!”

I am eating a hot dog in a beautiful courtyard right around dusk, and I would like to exclaim in Latin, "How beautiful!" I thought of saying "Quam pulchra!" which can't be far off, but I am wondering ...
8
votes
2answers
5k views

Double meaning Ex pluribus unum

Ex pluribus unum means (simplified) "From many, one", in the sense that many parts build one whole. Can I also use the phrase in the sense that from many possible solutions or things only one (the ...
7
votes
2answers
745 views

Two birds with one stone?

In English you kill two birds with one stone when you achieve two goals in one action. In Finnish or Dutch you get two flies in one hit. Is there a similar saying in Latin? I prefer classical Latin, ...
7
votes
1answer
88 views

“Nothing but seventh place is good enough”

I would like help modifying the famous phrase nil satis nisi optimum to lower expectations somewhat to "nothing but seventh place is good enough". Google Translate creates a suspicious range of ...
5
votes
2answers
220 views

Antonym for “de profundis”?

I'm looking to find out what the Latin for "from the heights" is, as the equivalent of Oscar Wilde's title "De Profundis".
6
votes
2answers
171 views

Translating “God knows how much/long” and similar

Consider these examples: Mr. Johnson has been the janitor for God knows how long. Right behind this park is the new bridge that cost God knows how much. You can replace "God knows how" with "...
8
votes
2answers
3k views

Why *In medias res* and not *In media res*?

Wikipedia gives literal translation as: Into the middle of things. As far as I am aware into – in takes accusative. Plural accusative of medium seems to be media, not medias Even if I am ...
11
votes
3answers
1k views

Origin of “seize the day” as a translation of Horace's carpe diem

Even many people who have never studied Latin know the phrase carpe diem (from Horace's Odes 1.11), and can tell you that it means "seize the day". But "seize" is not a very close translation of ...
4
votes
1answer
28 views

How to “look deep into one's eyes”?

In this question, the idiom "to look deep into one's eyes" came up. While the rest of the translation was relatively straightforward, I don't know of any equivalent idiom in Greek or Latin. If I ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

How would I say “I came, I saw, I kicked ass”?

I recently encountered someone in an online game who had the battlecry "Veni, vidi, calce asinum!". Now, my Latin's quite rusty, but I'm certain that can only be translated as "I came, I saw, I kicked ...
6
votes
1answer
129 views

Is there a Ancient Greek or Latin equivalent to “steely eyed”?

I'm looking for parallel idioms related by vocabulary and/or meaning. This is in reference to a question on Mythology regarding the "gray eyed" translation of an epithet of Athena: Why is Athena “...
6
votes
2answers
111 views

Looking a gift horse in the mouth

A common phrase for mistrust towards a given gift is looking a gift horse in the mouth. As explained in Wiktionary (linked above), the saying goes back to the New Testament via St. Jerome's Latin ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Is there a Latin expression to say the “exact opposite of something/someone”?

Consider the following English sentence: Clark Kent is the alter ego of Superman The latter uses a Latin expression, alter ego, meaning the "other self". Now, consider this sentence: ...
10
votes
2answers
876 views

Help your friends, harm your enemies

"Help your friends, harm your enemies." I have heard this was a motto of Roman life and foreign policy. It is the definition of justice that begins the discussion in Plato's Republic. I believe that ...
13
votes
3answers
2k views

How does one say “the will to live” in Latin?

Obviously, I don't trust Google translate, or I wouldn't be here. Just to clarify: By "The will", I mean "a deliberate or fixed desire or intention".
14
votes
3answers
2k views

How to translate “Ceteris Paribus”?

I'm studying economics, and the words ceteris paribus are often used. I know it means that one thing changes, but that the other factors stay the same. I was trying to figure out the translation ...
6
votes
2answers
83 views

Were there proverbs in Latin in the sense detailed by this question of mine?

Endless bits of wisdom from canonical writers have come down to us as Latin dicta: a sort of Ancient proverbs, if you will, with the notable exception that these were, unlike modern, post-Antiquity ...
7
votes
3answers
192 views

What is “old” in the age of a wine?

If I were to say "this man is 40 years old" in Latin, I would say hic vir 40 annos natus est. That is, I would use the participle natus instead of any adjective meaning "old", and it is my impression ...
8
votes
1answer
81 views

“Ad populum” idiom

Is "ad populum" ever seen as an idiom for "popular", or can it only mean "to the people"? For example, if something is considered popular, would "ad populum" be an acceptable phrase to use?
6
votes
1answer
136 views

An idiom for disclosing a secret

I am looking for a Latin idiom for disclosing a secret. In English one can spill the beans, but I am not aware of a similar idiom in Latin. Is any idiom or colorful expression for this attested in ...
7
votes
5answers
2k views

How to say “everything will be good” in Latin?

I wanted to find out how to say in Latin "everything will be good" (like in "all'll gon'a be fine"). I came up with Omnium bene futurum. Is this o.k., or am I too ill-Latined?
7
votes
1answer
640 views

Reservoir Dogs: “Let's go to work” in Latin

I'm a programmer and I regularly write small utility programs for friends and family. Since I like a joke, all those programs have help/about forms that describe the program as having been produced by ...
12
votes
3answers
711 views

En Marche ! in Latin

Macron's victory in France has got me wondering what would be the best way to capture the phrase "En Marche" in Latin? My first thought was to use the incedere with perhaps prorsus, but the English ...
9
votes
2answers
2k views

How to say “Luke, I am your father” in Latin?

I have found very diverse translations online: Luke, sum ipse patrem te Luca, pater tuus sum (or in a different order) Luke, ego patrem tuum sum My guess First, the Latin name Luke seems to be ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

“Let's wait and see”

Is there a Latin idiom for deciding to sit back and wait instead of acting immediately? If I want to let things evolve for a little more before taking any action, I could use the phrase "let's wait ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

What are the different ways to say “lonely”?

The English word "lonely" has at least a couple different uses. A person can be lonely — we all know, and have probably felt, this meaning of the word. But also a place can be lonely. A lot of people ...