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Questions tagged [idiom]

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5
votes
1answer
248 views

Can someone suggest a medical name conveying “idiopathic unfulfilled potential”?

The diagnosis of ADHD is effectively a clinical opinion that an individual is not reaching their full potential. It's also a claim about the underlying mechanism (being mediated by dopamine; a ...
2
votes
0answers
66 views

What is “cold war”?

How should I translate "cold war" in Latin? I can see two ways to approach this, using a classical phrase for a similar hostile political situation, or finding a suitable adjective for "cold" to go ...
11
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1answer
6k views

Ars gratia artis

I would like to know the meaning of the following Latin expression, as well as a grammatical analysis of the individual words in this context: ARS GRATIA ARTIS as it appears in the following logo ...
7
votes
1answer
375 views

Is “scholaris opus, scholaris vox” a correct translation of “student work, student voice”?

Some students of mine are creating a school publication featuring student work, and the proposed subtitle of their publication is: Scholaris Opus, Scholaris Vox The intended meaning is "student ...
3
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1answer
1k views

How to parse “Dis Manibus” syntactically?

Almost everyone who has ever seen a Roman grave inscription has seen the phrase Dis Manibus or its abbreviation DM. It starts almost every Roman tombstone I have seen. I know it means "to/for the ...
5
votes
1answer
67 views

Quid velit “Quid tibi vidétur dé [aliquó]” dícere?

Epistólió in electronicó quídam mihi sic scrípsit: "Quid tibi vidétur dé Epistuliís Leónínís?" (Epistulæ Leónínæ acta sunt hebdomadália ab eó missa, quás nóndum vídí.) Sententia (síve phrasis) "Quid ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Parsing pro rata temporis

Recently when reading some material related to research grants, I came across the Latin phrase pro rata temporis in English text. It was easy enough to understand in the context. For example, a 600&...
3
votes
1answer
81 views

How to say that it rains on something?

How can I say in Latin that it is raining on something? I can find ways around like pluvia rem tingit, but I would like something more literally "it rains on something" than "the rain makes something ...
5
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2answers
85 views

Translation of “trumped up charges”

There was a Greek play translated to Latin wherein a term was translated then to English as "trumped up charges". Might somebody know the play and more particularly the term itself?
6
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1answer
2k views

How do I welcome someone in Latin?

When someone comes to visit me at my villa, I would like to greet them and welcome them in. I know how to welcome English ("welcome"), German ("wilkommen"), and French ("bienvenue") guests in a single ...
4
votes
3answers
70 views

Is there a Latin idiom for a set date for an event?

Suppose I have a meeting, a court hearing, or any event that is set by some authority at a specific time in the future. Is there a word for such a "due date"? I don't mean a deadline (see the separate ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

How to say by/on the basis of?

In mathematics, the following phrase is common: By Theorem 5.6, the function is differentiable. How do I say 'by' in Latin? I don't think 'ab' is appropriate to use here. One way is to put '...
5
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1answer
42 views

Latin for “worth a hundred times its weight in gold”

I'm trying to figure out how to say something is "worth a hundred times its weight in gold" in Latin, and everything I come up with feels cumbersome, unLatinate, and unclear. Hoc textīle centuplex ...
4
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2answers
143 views

Quōmodo v. Quā ratiōne

I'm looking at a Latin translation of the Apology of Socrates by Marcellus Ficinus and I'm puzzled by the very first clause. Quā vōs quidem ratiōne, Ō virī Athēniēnsēs, affēcerint accūsātōrēs meī, ...
4
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1answer
125 views

(Loose) Translation of “seize the loyal”

I'm considering getting a tattoo with the phrase "Seize the loyal" in Latin, but I'm not 100% how to translate it. I am trying to get at something like "keep the loyal close" but it can be a very ...
2
votes
1answer
207 views

With which verb can I park a car?

What would be a good Latin translation for the verb "to park"? I mean contexts like "I parked my car in front of his house". I would prefer to have a classically attested verb, so my main question is ...
3
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1answer
72 views

How do you show something from a window?

Suppose, for example, that a child is watching his dad come home from work. She can't wait any longer to show what she's got, so she goes to the window and shows her new teddy bear to her dad. How can ...
6
votes
2answers
624 views

Walking “hand in hand”

How can I translate the sentence "We are walking hand in hand" in Latin? I am not sure how to render "hand in hand". A direct translation would be Ambulamus manus in manu. But can I use a nominative ...
4
votes
1answer
186 views

How to say 'For a [period of time]'

How would I say that something won't end for a period of time, for example: Dinner isn't over for another hour. I considered Cena non finet ante hora, but that didn't quite sound right. Update: ...
3
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3answers
82 views

Is there a more emphatic version of posse?

If I want to say "I can" in Latin, I will usually use posse. But what if I want something stronger and more emphatic, like "I am capable of", "I am able to", or similar? I am not aware of a Latin ...
5
votes
4answers
18k views

What is the Latin equivalent of “Ever Forward” as a motto?

In the workplace environment, I don’t think it is productive to dwell on what happened or keep score on who did what to whom. In English I would summarize my motto as: Ever Forward Now I am ...
4
votes
1answer
75 views

Does Latin have an animal-based term for “coward,” like “scaredy-cat” in English?

In English, a lowbrow way to call someone a coward is to call him or her a "scaredy-cat" or "fraidy-cat." Apparently, somewhere along the way cats got a reputation for being easily frightened. ...
6
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3answers
703 views

Peace and Good Will in Latin

I want to engrave "Peace and Good Will" on my ring in Latin. I have less then a quarter available for the engraving so it can't be too big. I originally wanted to use something from the Bible (even ...
3
votes
1answer
155 views

(Heart) White/Bright and Absit Invidia

I want to engrave a Latin phrase on a necklace for a family friend with the surname Whiteheart. I'm came up with "A Heart White/Bright and Without Malice", which in Latin I'm thinking might be ...
4
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1answer
49 views

Mistaking something for something

How do I phrase "mistaking something for something" idiomatically in Latin? There is always a way around if one wants to explain (eg. "I mistook the cat for a dog" > Felem canem esse falso putabam), ...
6
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2answers
320 views

How to translate “continued” into Latin when referring to pages in a book?

I'm formatting some letters we're reading this semester in my Latin class in Word so I have more space to annotate. I need to keep track of which text in my Word doc is on which page of the book the ...
12
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2answers
2k views

Does the “re” in emails have an ancient origin?

The Latin ablative re has become a word in English, meaning "regarding" or "with reference to" or something along those lines. This is also used in emails as an automatically generated prefix "Re:&...
6
votes
1answer
191 views

What is “idiom” in classical Latin?

What would be an idiomatic way to say "idiom" and "idiomatic" in classical Latin? One could perhaps use the Greek loan word idiōma (neuter), but I feel there should be a more Latin way of ...
13
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4answers
1k views

French and Latin “s'il te/vous plaît”

The phrases si tibi placet and si vobis placet can be found in Latin literature, but they are not particularly common. At least superficially they correspond to the French "s'il te plaît" and "s'il ...
7
votes
2answers
646 views

Are there Latin words for hair color?

English words like "brunette", "blonde", and "redhead" refer to people of a particular hair color. Are there similar words in Latin? It is easy to express hair color in English or Latin with several ...
8
votes
1answer
789 views

Is there a Latin equivalent for “All talk but no action”?

There was a discussion about the phrase "Blowing your own trumpet" which according to some means same. But when translated to Latin idioms it steered more towards just being "too proud" or "praising ...
7
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2answers
88 views

How to distinguish Julian and Gregorian calendars in Latin?

In some contexts it is important to express whether a given date (for example October 25 and November 7 in 1917) is according to the Julian or the Gregorian calendar. Are there established Latin ...
5
votes
2answers
248 views

How would you say, “How beautiful!”

I am eating a hot dog in a beautiful courtyard right around dusk, and I would like to exclaim in Latin, "How beautiful!" I thought of saying "Quam pulchra!" which can't be far off, but I am wondering ...
11
votes
1answer
384 views

In search of a Latin idiom expressing suspicion, i.e., a translation of “I smell a rat” or “something smells fishy”

Is there a Latin idiom, preferably one that was in currency in the classical period, that expresses the speaker's suspicion that something pertinent is being maliciously concealed from him? For ...
8
votes
2answers
5k views

Double meaning Ex pluribus unum

Ex pluribus unum means (simplified) "From many, one", in the sense that many parts build one whole. Can I also use the phrase in the sense that from many possible solutions or things only one (the ...
7
votes
2answers
768 views

Two birds with one stone?

In English you kill two birds with one stone when you achieve two goals in one action. In Finnish or Dutch you get two flies in one hit. Is there a similar saying in Latin? I prefer classical Latin, ...
9
votes
2answers
386 views

“Without further ado”

Suppose I have invited some friends for dinner and I want to say something before we eat. But I don't want to give a long speech. If I do this in English, I might start my last sentence with "without ...
8
votes
2answers
3k views

Why *In medias res* and not *In media res*?

Wikipedia gives literal translation as: Into the middle of things. As far as I am aware into – in takes accusative. Plural accusative of medium seems to be media, not medias Even if I am ...
10
votes
2answers
245 views

How do I express total surprise or perplexity when asking a question?

Are there conventional expressions in Latin to strengthen the question, showing total surprise or perplexity? How do you say, for example, "What the heck...?" or "Why on earth...?" in Latin?
4
votes
1answer
30 views

How to “look deep into one's eyes”?

In this question, the idiom "to look deep into one's eyes" came up. While the rest of the translation was relatively straightforward, I don't know of any equivalent idiom in Greek or Latin. If I ...
6
votes
1answer
135 views

Is there a Ancient Greek or Latin equivalent to “steely eyed”?

I'm looking for parallel idioms related by vocabulary and/or meaning. This is in reference to a question on Mythology regarding the "gray eyed" translation of an epithet of Athena: Why is Athena “...
5
votes
1answer
559 views

Latin for “Freedom through strength”?

How would one say "freedom through strength" in Latin? The word vis means strength and libertas is liberty/freedom. So would one say vis libertas?
10
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2answers
889 views

Help your friends, harm your enemies

"Help your friends, harm your enemies." I have heard this was a motto of Roman life and foreign policy. It is the definition of justice that begins the discussion in Plato's Republic. I believe that ...
9
votes
1answer
2k views

Semper Veritas, Semper Veritatem, or something else?

I'm considering getting a tattoo with the phrase "Always Truth" or "Always the Truth" in Latin, but I'm not 100% how to translate it, because I don't really understand Latin noun declension. My first ...
9
votes
2answers
895 views

How to express a time exactly on the hour?

I would like to express the following times in Latin: "at four o'clock sharp" "every hour, on the hour" I want to emphasize that the event takes place exactly on the hour. My dictionaries do not ...
6
votes
1answer
145 views

An idiom for disclosing a secret

I am looking for a Latin idiom for disclosing a secret. In English one can spill the beans, but I am not aware of a similar idiom in Latin. Is any idiom or colorful expression for this attested in ...