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Questions tagged [idiom]

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10
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3answers
1k views

Origin of “seize the day” as a translation of Horace's carpe diem

Even many people who have never studied Latin know the phrase carpe diem (from Horace's Odes 1.11), and can tell you that it means "seize the day". But "seize" is not a very close translation of ...
2
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2answers
162 views

What does the Latin phrase “argumentum ab invidia ductum” mean?

How would one translate "argumentum ab invidia ductum" into English?
2
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0answers
141 views

What is “sense of humour” in Latin?

What would be a good classical Latin translation of "sense of humour"? I can find words for "humour", but I am not sure how to go about "sense of". Would one of the humour words be adequate on its own ...
12
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2answers
276 views

Is the usage of “id est” in Latin exactly like the usage of “i.e.” or “that is” in English?

There was a question a little while back on the English SE asking about the "plural form of i.e." (unfortunately, it got closed because the author didn't clarify what they meant). While I was trying ...
14
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3answers
2k views

How to translate “Ceteris Paribus”?

I'm studying economics, and the words ceteris paribus are often used. I know it means that one thing changes, but that the other factors stay the same. I was trying to figure out the translation ...
9
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2answers
356 views

“Initium doctrinae sit consideratio nominis”

I'm looking for a Latin phrase for starting your exposition by explaining the terms, i.e. its title. I believe the quote is "initium doctrinae sit consideratio nominis," but I'm not sure that that's ...
-1
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2answers
1k views

“Et tu, Brute?”

"Et tu, Brute?" Julius Caesar's last words; according to William Shakespeare's play of the same name. There seems to be a difference of opinion regarding the exact translation and thus, too, ...
9
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1answer
909 views

Variable Interpretation of Memento Mori

I'm given to understand that "memento mori" literally translates to "remember dying," which is in turn frequently taken to mean "remember that you will die." Could someone also interpret it to mean "...
4
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1answer
131 views

What is a single parent?

Is there a Latin expression for a single parent? By single parent I mean the only (present) parent of a child, and I don't want to comment on the reason the other biological parent is not there. Was ...
12
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2answers
3k views

How to say “please pray for me” in ecclesiastical latin?

I know that ora pro me means "pray for me", but how would I express my request politely, such as in the English equivalent "Please pray for me" ?
4
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1answer
480 views

Arx celebris fontibus

I bought yesterday a bottled mineral water, of the Harrogate brand, which label states: Harrogate's motto 'Arx celebris fontibus' translates as 'a citadel famous for its springs'. (this is the ...
3
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1answer
57 views

Can I use abesse with hinc, inde, and others?

Is it idiomatic in classical Latin to combine the verb abesse with hinc, inde, or other such pronouns meaning "from somewhere"? This is surely an at least intelligible way to say "to be away from here/...
13
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3answers
2k views

How does one say “the will to live” in Latin?

Obviously, I don't trust Google translate, or I wouldn't be here. Just to clarify: By "The will", I mean "a deliberate or fixed desire or intention".
2
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4answers
797 views

Please help to translate “A life, mine…” to Latin

I am writing a blog and I want to have the title in Latin. It's a personal blog and I want to share about my personal experiences, the thing to do when there is no one else to share it with ;) I want ...
7
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3answers
285 views

Translating a saying about love into Latin

Where I come from, we have an ironic saying about love, it could be translated into English as: Love is warming, but coal is coal (Or perhaps less literally as "Love is heartwarming, but coal will ...
4
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2answers
98 views

Mock up of Coat of Arms

I want to make a coat of arms for my father in law, and we always refer to him doing anything with the phrase - "that'll do". Is there a Latin phrase that this translates to? Google translate has ...
6
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3answers
2k views

How to say “well done”?

Is there a Latin phrase similar to the English "well done!" to be used to congratulate someone for achieving something? Translating from English, one might expect bene factum! or bene fecisti! or ...
5
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5answers
531 views

Touching emotionally

In English or Finnish I can say that I was touched by something or an experience was touching, meaning that I was touched emotionally, not physically. How can I express the same in Latin? Does tangere ...
4
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3answers
327 views

Is there a Latin source for “He who is able to laugh at himself, is invincible”?

Some time ago I came across a Latin sentence that roughly came down to: "He who is able to laugh at himself, is invincible" At the time I thought: Oh well, this must be a well known Roman saying (...
6
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2answers
87 views

How would one convey “a snowball's chance in hell” in Latin?

As a good pessimist, I frequently wish to humorously convey extremely low probabilities. I'll often use the phrase "a snowball's chance in hell," or a variation of it, to express this: There's a ...
6
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1answer
125 views

What would be a “lark” or “early bird” in Latin

Inspired by this question What would be a "night owl" in Latin? and its excellent answers, I's like to know about the antonym of a "night owl": What would be a "lark" or "early bird"? I was ...
7
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3answers
194 views

What is “old” in the age of a wine?

If I were to say "this man is 40 years old" in Latin, I would say hic vir 40 annos natus est. That is, I would use the participle natus instead of any adjective meaning "old", and it is my impression ...
5
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1answer
42 views

How to express one thing is more important than another?

How to express that one thing is more important in Latin? As an example, voice of the people over voice of the king can be stated in Latin as Vox populi supra vox regis. I interested in expressing ...
6
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0answers
60 views

Do any Latin authors preserve Etruscan quotations?

Many Latin and a few Greek phrases are now used in English, even by people who don't necessarily know the original language, as proverbs, phrases, mottos, and so on. Many short fragments from ancient ...
6
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2answers
85 views

Were there proverbs in Latin in the sense detailed by this question of mine?

Endless bits of wisdom from canonical writers have come down to us as Latin dicta: a sort of Ancient proverbs, if you will, with the notable exception that these were, unlike modern, post-Antiquity ...
3
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2answers
391 views

“Quemcunque miserum videris nominem scias”

Can someone help me find the meaning of this phrase? Quemcunque miserum videris nominem scias.
5
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1answer
463 views

How to say that you were just kidding?

It is not unusual to attempt to say something humorous but it is mistaken for as serious statement. In this situation I might say "Just kidding!", "I wasn't serious!", "it was a joke!", or something ...
6
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2answers
1k views

How to say “I regret to inform you that”?

How to express the following sentence in Latin? I am after a good choice of structure, not a literal translation. "I regret to inform you that our old teacher has died." My suggestion is Doleo te ...
7
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1answer
74 views

How to describe qualifications?

I recently obtained formal qualifications to teach Latin (and mathematics and physics) in a number of Finnish schools and I got my diploma yesterday. How should I go about expressing this in Latin? Is ...
3
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1answer
115 views

An idiom for a young-looking older person

How can I say idiomatically in classical Latin that someone is old but still looks young? Should I say bene senuit ("he has aged well"), should I use a participle like bene reservatus/retentatus, or ...
4
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0answers
46 views

An idiom for “on the road”

I spend much of my time travelling, and that brings all kinds of challenges. For example, it can be hard to follow my preferred diet and I don't have access to my books. How could I express such ...
6
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3answers
1k views

Where does the phrase “mors omnia solvit” come from?

A couple of years ago I stumbled across the phrase "mors omnia solvit", and I got the impression that it was a rather well establihed saying. Now I started to research the source of this phrase (for ...
4
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3answers
323 views

What is the correct way to write “The Prince's Book” in Latin?

Greetings Latin StackExchange. One of my hobbies is to write stories and in one of my stories I would like to incorporate an item called "The Prince's Book". My ideal goal is that this item is written ...
5
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1answer
84 views

A thing of flesh and blood

Jerome K. Jerome in the preface to his comic novel Three Men in a Boat tells us that his characters are not imaginary, but 'things of flesh and blood'. The best I can do so far is the phrase sunt ...
10
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1answer
163 views

He is known for…?

How would one best translate the English idiom "to be known for", as in "he is known for defeating the Gauls"? This came up when discussing uses of the gerund, but in English the idiom also works with ...
2
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2answers
181 views

What is the Latin expression for “day one”?

What is the Latin expression for "day one", as expressed as the first day of the rest of your life?
3
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3answers
123 views

Translation of a phrase about unknown people into Latin

What would be the way to say that you don't care about people you don't know? Something like "I don't care about those I don't know" or "I ignore the faceless masses."
2
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2answers
58 views

Flags flying at half-mast

A well-known mathematician passed away recently, and I happened to be in the Trinity College on the day after. As any Cambridge college undoubtedly would, they mourned the loss of a fellow by flying ...
10
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1answer
185 views

Quando “a fortiori” ortum est?

Quando vocabulum a fortiori (sive a fortiore) ortum est ut nomen artis legis logicæve? In quo opere scripto primum apparuit? Volo intellegere eius rationem originis verificareque verbum elisum "...
3
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2answers
201 views

Latin for 'at arm's length'

Idiomatically, the English expression 'at arm's length' means something like 'within sight, but avoiding any form of contact'. It can be used either physically or metaphorically. I'm trying hard to ...
4
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1answer
71 views

Spatial equivalent to extemporalis/intempestivus?

The term extemporalis refers unusual events in time, such as an exceptional snowstorm in spring time. I was wondering if there is an equivalent term which refers, not to a temporal aspect of an ...
4
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0answers
66 views

Attempting to preemptively disqualify retort

If I were to say: The sky is falling! It undeniably false to claim that I am overreacting, as my detractors are sure to do. Is there a common Latin phrase that encapsulates that, the tactic or ...
5
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2answers
174 views

Is there a colorful term for an uninvited guest?

Is there a colorful Latin term for an uninvited guest? Of course I can say something like conviva non invitatus, but I wonder if there is something less boring, akin to the English "gatecrasher" or ...
7
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1answer
649 views

Reservoir Dogs: “Let's go to work” in Latin

I'm a programmer and I regularly write small utility programs for friends and family. Since I like a joke, all those programs have help/about forms that describe the program as having been produced by ...
4
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1answer
71 views

A correct title for the book from the Evil Dead movies?

In the Evil Dead movies the infamous book is given an inconsistently spelled name, which vanished in the other installments. The scripts for the original movie and the remake titled it "Naturan ...
7
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1answer
89 views

“Nothing but seventh place is good enough”

I would like help modifying the famous phrase nil satis nisi optimum to lower expectations somewhat to "nothing but seventh place is good enough". Google Translate creates a suspicious range of ...
9
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2answers
354 views

What is a runny nose?

I got a cold, and the most irritating symptom so far is a runny nose (rhinorrhea). But what is "runny nose" in Latin? It can be a noun, a verb, or any kind of way to describe the situation. I don't ...
5
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1answer
81 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “solitō māiōre”?

A fellow member of a Latin Discord server I participate in posted this link to an article with a question regarding how one would interpret the phrase "solitō māiōre". Despite our efforts to interpret ...
4
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2answers
1k views

How would I say “I came, I saw, I kicked ass”?

I recently encountered someone in an online game who had the battlecry "Veni, vidi, calce asinum!". Now, my Latin's quite rusty, but I'm certain that can only be translated as "I came, I saw, I kicked ...