Questions tagged [idiom]

For questions concerning expressions, word-plays, symbolic language, metaphors and the likes.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2
votes
1answer
161 views

How would I say to someone, "be yourself"?

If I wanted to advise or counsel someone that they should be themselves because this would ultimately make them happy, how would I say this? My initial thought is something like: Te Ipsum Es Is ...
4
votes
1answer
127 views

What would be a proper reaction to the question: "Can you come over?" or how do you say "Coming" in Latin?

In a comment to this question, JoonasIlmavirta suggests a spin-off question. I have had this question simmering for quite some time, but this is a nice incentive. Consider the following cross-language ...
11
votes
3answers
782 views

Parsing "quae cum audisset"

I'm having trouble parsing the phrase "quae cum audisset," which I've seen translated as "when [subject] heard" or "and when [subject] heard" in the latin vulgate. For ...
7
votes
1answer
130 views

Which preposition should be used with contrario and why?

Is it better to say argumentum a/ab contrario or e/ex contrario? It seems that both are acceptable but in most Romance languages it is a contrario. The movement out/from is not clear/explicit/graphic ...
4
votes
1answer
265 views

Is "aliae alias in partes" an idiom of some kind?

In Fabulae Faciles, section 82, I do not understand the expression "aliae alias in partes". Is this some kind of idiom? The phrase is: Postquam tamen pauca mīlia passuum ā lītore Trōiae ...
13
votes
2answers
3k views

Does the "re" in emails have an ancient origin?

The Latin ablative re has become a word in English, meaning "regarding" or "with reference to" or something along those lines. This is also used in emails as an automatically generated prefix "Re:&...
8
votes
1answer
853 views

How to say "I look forward to hearing from you" in Latin?

It is sometimes appropriate to add "I look forward to hearing from you" at the end of a letter or other similar communication. I am looking for a phrase that says more "I am happy if you react to this ...
14
votes
2answers
19k views

What did the Romans use to close their letters?

As anyone who's written a proper letter knows, one begins with a salutation and ends with a valediction (or, in normal English, opens with "hello" and ends with "goodbye"). Right ...
4
votes
1answer
372 views

What is "sense of humour" in Latin?

What would be a good classical Latin translation of "sense of humour"? I can find words for "humour", but I am not sure how to go about "sense of". Would one of the humour words be adequate on its own ...
4
votes
1answer
68 views

What feminine noun is implied in ἐφέροντο τὴν πρώτην "were the leaders" (Philostratus)?

Philostratus, Lives of the Sophists 1.18: ἡ Ἀθήνησι δημαγωγία διειστήκει πᾶσα, καὶ οἱ μὲν βασιλεῖ ἐπιτήδειοι ἦσαν, οἱ δὲ Μακεδόσιν, ἐφέροντο δὲ ἄρα τὴν πρώτην τῶν μὲν βασιλεῖ χαριζομένων ὁ Παιανιεὺς ...
8
votes
2answers
14k views

What's the most idiomatic way to say, "thanks, you too"?

We were discussing this question in the chat room, and came up with the possibility, gratias similiter, but we are not sure whether it's idiomatic. The context is this. Let's say a co-worker says to ...
7
votes
1answer
123 views

Use of "in" with ablative

I'm hoping someone can clarify the meaning of the medieval Latin phrase "in ipsa" when referring to a decision or action not being "in" or "upon" someone, which I assume ...
7
votes
3answers
846 views

Translate "mind over body"

I should start by saying that my experience with latin extends as far as the fact that some words sound similar in italian, not much more. I'm trying to translate the idiom "mind over body", ...
7
votes
1answer
119 views

Is there a more idiomatic way to say "to begin again"?

Incipere iterum seems like a very literal way to say "to begin again". Is there a more idiomatic way to say this? For additional context, when I think of this phrase, I think of something ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

Is there a Latin euphemism for going to the toilet?

In some situations it might be considered vulgar or lower style to say "I have to go to the toilet". In English there are many ways around this: you can call the toilet something finer (bathroom, ...
3
votes
2answers
512 views

A Latin motto for SpaceX

Jeff Bezos company Blue Origin has a motto “Gradatim Ferociter” or Step by Step Ferociously, although they seem to take a very long time to do anything. Elon Musk also runs a rocket company (SpaceX). ...
16
votes
2answers
3k views

What do animals say in classical Latin?

It is well known that the way animals "speak" is amusingly different in different languages. (See lion below.) This makes it hard to guess what kinds of words the Romans would have put in the mouths ...
4
votes
2answers
298 views

A proverb «Talk bad, talk nice about me, but just talk»

Once heard alike in Latin, which context was that of people seeking, even demanding a shabby popularity, reputation in any of its' forms. What would be a proper translation for that proverb? Edit: ...
7
votes
0answers
58 views

Roman wedding congratulations

How did the Romans congratulate a couple on their wedding day? The concepts of wedding and marriage were not quite what they are now back then, but I assume that celebrations and congratulations were ...
6
votes
2answers
198 views

Is there a Latin construction for a tentative question/suggestion analogous to "I wonder [question word]"?

At first, I thought "me rogo," but the dictionary did not confirm my suggestion. I think my German is interfering ("ich frage mich").
2
votes
3answers
2k views

"Et tu, Brute?"

"Et tu, Brute?" Julius Caesar's last words; according to William Shakespeare's play of the same name. There seems to be a difference of opinion regarding the exact translation and thus, too, ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

How to say “dudes rock” in Latin?

I want to translate "dudes rock" into Latin. Google Translate and working with synonyms got me to viri sunt prodigiosus (“men are amazing” more or less?). But I'm wondering if there’s an ...
11
votes
1answer
737 views

Which is more correct, "status quo" or "statu quo"?

I always heard and read the expression "status quo" but I just found the alternative spelling "statu quo" in the Italian translation of Motivational Interviewing by Miller e ...
8
votes
1answer
188 views

A is for... Latin examples

Are there any ancient—or modern, if not—examples of a learner's alphabet that mirrors the modern "A is for..."? I'm not really looking for poetry that has an alphabet acrostic or any other ...
9
votes
4answers
932 views

"Wishful thinking" in Latin

How to express the that a scenario just mentioned is probably too-optimistic and unlikely to happen (and might merely reflect the hopes of one, rather than being grounded on evidence). phantasia comes ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

How to parse "Dis Manibus" syntactically?

Almost everyone who has ever seen a Roman grave inscription has seen the phrase Dis Manibus or its abbreviation DM. It starts almost every Roman tombstone I have seen. I know it means "to/for the ...
12
votes
1answer
1k views

How did the Romans congratulate a new father?

One of our users recently became a father and of course congratulations are in order. How did the Romans do that? More specifically, are there any attested congratulations to a new father in the ...
12
votes
3answers
1k views

Latin for "In war and in peace"

I remember reading long ago a pithy Latin expression for “in war and peace,” or “in war as in peace,” or something to that effect. The idea is that one might say, for example, that a certain truth ...
10
votes
3answers
4k views

Could one consider using Latin as a daily casual language these days?

I just saw a video asking like how would one say I just had an avocado toast and thought about some of the new stuff that didn't exist back then. How would we integrate new words into the Latin ...
15
votes
2answers
947 views

Is the usage of "id est" in Latin exactly like the usage of "i.e." or "that is" in English?

There was a question a little while back on the English SE asking about the "plural form of i.e." (unfortunately, it got closed because the author didn't clarify what they meant). While I was trying ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

How do you say "good morning" in Latin?

Are there different ways to say good morning in Latin? Would bene mane be okay?
1
vote
1answer
79 views

"Life decreed better!" in Latin

Sort of, related to my another qestion. I am looking for mo secular (for the lack of a better word) version of a phrase "Di melius!". While I know that deus could be interpreted as "...
7
votes
3answers
898 views

How can we say "not even wrong" in Latin?

The phrase "not even wrong" is thought to have originated from Wolfgang Pauli. The phrase was allegedly spoken in German before becoming a meme: Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig; es ist ...
4
votes
1answer
251 views

How is "as...as" to be Expressed in Latin?

In expressions e.g. "A change is as good as a rest."; "He was as good as his word."; how is the "as...as" part to be translated? I've found quid sicut bonum ("Word ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

How to respond to sneezing?

There is an idiomatic way to respond to someone sneezing in many languages, and Wikipedia has a list. Latin is not included. Is there a canonical Latin reaction to someone sneezing? Any era of Latin ...
10
votes
1answer
223 views

Quando "a fortiori" ortum est?

Quando vocabulum a fortiori (sive a fortiore) ortum est ut nomen artis legis logicæve? In quo opere scripto primum apparuit? Volo intellegere eius rationem originis verificareque verbum elisum "...
4
votes
1answer
80 views

Looking for the most accurate translation of "Remember and Persevere"

I'm looking for a nice Latin phrase to put on my college class ring. Being honest: college was a pretty rough time for me, but I've pulled through a lot of hardships and I'm gonna be the first of my ...
25
votes
3answers
9k views

What is bullshit in Latin?

If a statement is blatantly wrong or shows lack of interest in the truth, one can call it bullshit in English. But how about Latin? Is there something more strong and colorful than falsus? I am not ...
7
votes
1answer
648 views

"How do you do?"

How to ask "How do you do?" in Latin. Quomodo te habes, is it common? What other common greetings for the "How are you?" exist? I have seen: Quomodo es? Quid agis? Quomodo te habes?
6
votes
1answer
133 views

How do I negate an ut clause of result?

Ut clauses of result are excellent for saying "so ___ that". But what if I wanted to reverse this and say "not ___ enough to"? For example, tam strenue laborābam ut epistolās centum scripserim means "...
7
votes
1answer
198 views

Maria mater Domini

The phrase "Maria mater Domini" appears in Pseudo-Papias Fragment X (A fragment attributed by J.B. Lightfoot to Papias of Lombardy, 1040s–1060s, author of the Elementarium Doctrinae ...
3
votes
2answers
130 views

Usage of fugio as an idiom to mean forget

I am confused how fugio is used grammatically when it is used idiomatically to mean forget. In Latin the regular word for forget is dedisco (to unlearn). However, usually the Latins used various ...
8
votes
1answer
251 views

What is Peniculus insinuating with his reference to Samian crockery?

Introduction and question Pl. Men. 1.2.71. Pēn. Metuis, crēdō, nē forēs sămiae sient. Pēniculus You fear, I believe, that the doors may be Samian*. * By [Henry Thomas Riley][1] translated as ‘of ...
15
votes
1answer
738 views

Omnia vincit amor: vincere or vincire?

The phrase omnia vincit amor (from Vergilius' tenth Ecloga; see full text in Latin and English) is typically translated as "love conquers everything". However, vincit can come from either vincere (to ...
8
votes
3answers
9k views

Meaning of “supra se servitium”

Background In the TV series Fallet, some of the upper class of the fictional town of Norbacka use the phrase supra se servitium as a sort of salutation. Its meaning is never elaborated upon. My ...
4
votes
1answer
206 views

Two kinds of falling

The English verb "fall", when the subject is a human, has two main kinds of literal1 meaning as far as I can tell: A change of position: Moving suddenly from higher elevation to lower. (The ...
9
votes
3answers
43k views

Is my interpretation of "Ad Astra per Aspera" correct?

I came across the phrase ad astra per aspera — "to the stars through difficulties." I think I know what it means, but my interpretation appears to be at odds with others. For example: The ...
4
votes
2answers
110 views

How should the phrase "in question" be translated into Latin?

I want to translate the phrase "in question" into Latin, as in: Please deposit the car keys next to the car in question, and then leave by the main door. How would I express this?
6
votes
1answer
166 views

UPDATE: How to translate "Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable?"

I am trying to translate the saying "Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable" into Latin, but I don't actually know Latin, and I've run into a wall. I think the verbs should be ...

1
2 3 4 5
8