Questions tagged [idiom]

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3
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0answers
68 views

What fresh hell is this?

“What fresh hell is this?” is a question frequently uttered (or so it has been reported) by writer Dorothy Parker, on such occasions as when the doorbell or the telephone rang, expressing her ...
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2answers
206 views

What is the source of the Greek phrase πύξ, λάξ, δάξ?

πύξ, λάξ, δάξ "by punching, kicking, and biting" is described by Wikipedia as an "epigram describing how laypersons were chased away from the Eleusinian Mysteries". Where is this ...
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3answers
307 views

How do I express total surprise or perplexity when asking a question?

Are there conventional expressions in Latin to strengthen the question, showing total surprise or perplexity? How do you say, for example, "What the heck...?" or "Why on earth...?" in Latin?
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2answers
348 views

Furtum est, secundum lege lata, contrectatio rei alienae fraudulenta

How to say this in proper, idiomatic, classical Latin? Theft is, according to existing law, laying hands on others' (foreign, strange, belonging to others) things fraudulently. Would one use the ...
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3answers
2k views

Are there native tongue-twisters in Latin?

Many languages have well established "tongue-twisters" (phrases difficult to articulate). In my native Spanish, "classic" examples are Pedro Pablo Pinto Pérez Pereira, pobre ...
4
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1answer
65 views

How would I say “From the mind of” in latin?

I'm making a journal for my girlfriend and would like to put "from the mind of [name]" on the front page. Sort of a play on "ex libris". If that doesn't really work, or sounds odd, "[name]'s thoughts" ...
8
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1answer
114 views

A is for… Latin examples

Are there any ancient—or modern, if not—examples of a learner's alphabet that mirrors the modern "A is for..."? I'm not really looking for poetry that has an alphabet acrostic or any other ...
3
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2answers
45 views

Translation of the proper name “Memorial Day”

I have a healthy distrust of Google Translate, which translates the proper name "Memorial Day" into... Diem in Monimentum The reverse translation becomes "Day of Remembrance," which is accurate if ...
5
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1answer
83 views

Proper use of “tenaciter servanda”

How would it be proper to characterise (adverbially or adjectivally) longus usus, opinio juris so as to mean a belief of law (belief of a legal requirement) in long use holding uninterrupted and ...
8
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3answers
416 views

Is this Latin statement idiomatic? (Can't quite link it to the English translation)

Consider the Bible verse 1 Corinthians 1:25. There are varied English translations of this verse (see here). The two most common are: For the foolishness of God is wiser than men, and the weakness of ...
6
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2answers
986 views

Latin Phrase for “It goes without saying”

The title of the question pretty much sums it up. I am looking for a Latin phrase for the English expression "It goes without saying." I am not sure if an analogous expression exists- although I would ...
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2answers
1k views

Latin for “In war and in peace”

I remember reading long ago a pithy Latin expression for “in war and peace,” or “in war as in peace,” or something to that effect. The idea is that one might say, for example, that a certain truth ...
6
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2answers
761 views

How can we say “not even wrong” in Latin?

The phrase "not even wrong" is thought to have originated from Wolfgang Pauli. The phrase was allegedly spoken in German before becoming a meme: Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig; es ist ...
13
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2answers
3k views

What do animals say in classical Latin?

It is well known that the way animals "speak" is amusingly different in different languages. (See lion below.) This makes it hard to guess what kinds of words the Romans would have put in the mouths ...
3
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2answers
992 views

“Hunt like a wolf, feast like a god” — is the Google translation correct?

I want to translate this to Latin: hunt like a wolf feast like a god Google gives me sicut lupos venari a deo quasi festum To my understanding, the words are pretty much correct, but does ...
3
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1answer
128 views

Translation to Latin of “everything is revenge”

I'm trying to translate a phrase. I'm trying to say "everything is (part of) revenge", as in "every action is an act of revenge against the ones that tried to break you". Sorry if it's not too clear ...
25
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3answers
7k views

What is bullshit in Latin?

If a statement is blatantly wrong, one can call it bullshit in English. But how about Latin? Is there something more strong and colorful than falsus? I am not convinced that a direct translation would ...
2
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2answers
120 views

Amor est adequatio rei intellectus- is this correct for 'Love is the equalizing of understanding'?

I would like to find a Latin sentence similar to 'Veritas est intellectus rei adequatio' but with Amor instead of Veritas.
7
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3answers
1k views

What is an idiomatic translation of “practice makes perfect”?

In English, we say "practice makes perfect" to indicate that practice of a skill leads to mastery. So a Latin teacher might attempt to inspire a student to diligence by saying "Write out these ...
4
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1answer
123 views

Idiomatic translation for family motto from English

When working on an improved version of our clan's crest, it was decided to add the motto (which had so far been absent from the design). The motto in English is "no time for caution". Related ...
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2answers
116 views

How to translate the phrases “both worlds” and “the best of both worlds” into Classical Latin?

How to properly write the expression "the best of both worlds" and the shorter phrase "both worlds" (meant in the same context as in the larger phrase) in Classical Latin?
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1answer
60 views

idiom for 'Don't give up the day job'

One of my favourite phrases is 'Don't give up the day job' for when someone is not very good at something. I put together 'Noli labor a die dedere'. However 'labor' is more 'task' instead of 'job' and ...
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1answer
161 views

How do you say “hunt or be hunted” or “hunt lest you be hunted” in Latin?

I found that neca ne neceris means "kill lest you be killed" and would like to modify this to "hunt lest you be hunted." It looks like venor is the verb for "hunting" but I'm not sure what the proper ...
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2answers
9k views

Ars gratia artis

I would like to know the meaning of the following Latin expression, as well as a grammatical analysis of the individual words in this context: ARS GRATIA ARTIS as it appears in the following logo ...
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2answers
3k views

Why *In medias res* and not *In media res*?

Wikipedia gives literal translation as: Into the middle of things. As far as I am aware into – in takes accusative. Plural accusative of medium seems to be media, not medias Even if I am ...
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1answer
1k views

What is the phrase “Above all the hunt” translated into Latin?

I'm designing a sigil for my special forces team in a sci-fi book I'm writing, and without making this a 10,000 word post with backstory, the phrase on the sigil is "Above all, the hunt". Google and ...
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4answers
2k views

Proper parsing of “Ite, missa est”

In the Catholic liturgy at the dismissal, the Latin phrase used is "Ite, missa est." The usual translation for this is "Go, the Mass has ended." Can someone suggest a proper parsing of this somewhat ...
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2answers
2k views

“There is” in Latin

In English you use the phrasal verb there+[to be] to mean something different than just an object being placed somewhere visible or known to the speaker and/or listener (i.e., there). According to ...
3
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1answer
51 views

Should one use the singular or plural when the number is unknown?

It just occurred to me (I'm that guy maybe starting the YouTube channel) that I don't know whether to use the singular or plural to address my audience in Latin. My thinking goes like this: plural ...
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5answers
2k views

How do I say “this is why…”?

I've seen this meme circulating lately, pointing out one of the many valid reasons to learn to speak dead languages properly: My first thought was, "this is why we need to mark long vowels!" But I ...
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6answers
4k views

How to say “everything will be good” in Latin?

I wanted to find out how to say in Latin "everything will be good" (like in "all'll gon'a be fine"). I came up with Omnium bene futurum. Is this o.k., or am I too ill-Latined?
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1answer
198 views

“How do you do?”

How to ask "How do you do?" in Latin. Quomodo te habes, is it common? What other common greetings for the "How are you?" exist? I have seen: Quomodo es? Quid agis? Quomodo te habes?
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2answers
29k views

Is my interpretation of “Ad Astra per Aspera” correct?

I came across the phrase ad astra per aspera — "to the stars through difficulties." I think I know what it means, but my interpretation appears to be at odds with others. For example: The ...
6
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1answer
227 views

Is “The beginning is half of every action” truly a Greek proverb?

I found in a book from 2015 a box with the quote: The beginning is half of every action. (Greek proverb) I googled it and there are many "pop websites" with the same quote. But none with a ...
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2answers
1k views

How to parse “semper eadem” grammatically?

The phrase semper eadem, "always the same", is a fairly popular motto. It is easy enough to interpret semantically, but I could not convince myself about the exact grammatical interpretation of the ...
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3answers
1k views

Are there Latin words for hair color?

English words like "brunette", "blonde", and "redhead" refer to people of a particular hair color. Are there similar words in Latin? It is easy to express hair color in English or Latin with several ...
4
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1answer
257 views

What do you say in Latin when something sucks?

In English you can say: "This job/movie/party/[anything] sucks!" This is a concise and slightly profane way of expressing displeasure. Is there something similar in Latin? The corresponding Finnish ...
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1answer
71 views

Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar - Could some one please help to translate this

Could someone please help to transtale "Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar" to English? Many thanks and best regards, Phuong
1
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1answer
59 views

My boy, my woman, my man, my girl

What would be the meaning for "my girl", "my man", "my boy", "my woman" in Latin? If I use filia tua, it means you daughter, but could be used as puella tua to mean the same, or is there other ...
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0answers
48 views

Is it possible to use a prepositional phrase with a gerundive/gerund?

can we use prepositional phrases (like "de domo") linked to a gerund or a gerundive, can it act as an object?
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1answer
568 views

May they rest in peace

This may become an inscription written on a historical marker commemorating a mass grave. Which of the following is correct: Requiesce in Pace or Requiescant in Pace? The former was offered up by a ...
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3answers
583 views

How to say “elämä kantaa” or “life will prevail”?

How can one translate the Finnish phrase "elämä kantaa" or "elämä voittaa" to Latin? The literal English translations are "life carries" and "life wins". The first phrase means roughly "even in hard ...
4
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1answer
81 views

Finer Tuning on Expressions-of-Time

Qs have been asked about expressions-of-time, of the type: "in the second year" = "secondo anno"; "within three days" = "tribus diebus"; "for two years&...
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2answers
118 views

Looking a gift horse in the mouth

A common phrase for mistrust towards a given gift is looking a gift horse in the mouth. As explained in Wiktionary (linked above), the saying goes back to the New Testament via St. Jerome's Latin ...
4
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1answer
1k views

What is the opposite of “aegrescit medendo”?

There is a well-known Latin phrase, aegrescit medendo, which means, "worsens with treatment". I believe it comes from Virgil (correct me if I am wrong). I wanted to know if there is an attested phrase ...
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1answer
1k views

Idiom for “I came, I saw, I ate” (or drank)

I'm trying to follow the "ee" sound pattern at the end of each word in the idiom "veni, vidi, vici" with translations of the following: I came, I saw, I ate: Veni, Vidi, Edi I came, I saw, I drank: ...
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3answers
13k views

How did the Romans say “good night”?

There are a lot of different things in a lot of different languages that mean basically the same thing: Sleep well. English: Sleep tight, don't let the bedbugs bite Italiano: Buona notte, sogni d'oro ...
3
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2answers
85 views

Two by four meters in size

If I want to describe the dimensions of my office, I might say that it is about two by four meters. How do I phrase this size, "two by four meters", in Latin? I don't just want to say that the area ...

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