Questions tagged [idiom]

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8
votes
3answers
3k views

Why *In medias res* and not *In media res*?

Wikipedia gives literal translation as: Into the middle of things. As far as I am aware into – in takes accusative. Plural accusative of medium seems to be media, not medias Even if I am ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the phrase “Above all the hunt” translated into Latin?

I'm designing a sigil for my special forces team in a sci-fi book I'm writing, and without making this a 10,000 word post with backstory, the phrase on the sigil is "Above all, the hunt". Google and ...
14
votes
4answers
2k views

Proper parsing of “Ite, missa est”

In the Catholic liturgy at the dismissal, the Latin phrase used is "Ite, missa est." The usual translation for this is "Go, the Mass has ended." Can someone suggest a proper parsing of this somewhat ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

“There is” in Latin

In English you use the phrasal verb there+[to be] to mean something different than just an object being placed somewhere visible or known to the speaker and/or listener (i.e., there). According to ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Should one use the singular or plural when the number is unknown?

It just occurred to me (I'm that guy maybe starting the YouTube channel) that I don't know whether to use the singular or plural to address my audience in Latin. My thinking goes like this: plural ...
9
votes
5answers
2k views

How do I say “this is why…”?

I've seen this meme circulating lately, pointing out one of the many valid reasons to learn to speak dead languages properly: My first thought was, "this is why we need to mark long vowels!" But I ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Translation to Latin of “everything is revenge”

I'm trying to translate a phrase. I'm trying to say "everything is (part of) revenge", as in "every action is an act of revenge against the ones that tried to break you". Sorry if it's not too clear ...
11
votes
2answers
6k views

Ars gratia artis

I would like to know the meaning of the following Latin expression, as well as a grammatical analysis of the individual words in this context: ARS GRATIA ARTIS as it appears in the following logo ...
7
votes
6answers
3k views

How to say “everything will be good” in Latin?

I wanted to find out how to say in Latin "everything will be good" (like in "all'll gon'a be fine"). I came up with Omnium bene futurum. Is this o.k., or am I too ill-Latined?
4
votes
2answers
152 views

“How do you do?”

How to ask "How do you do?" in Latin. Quomodo te habes, is it common? What other common greetings for the "How are you?" exist? I have seen: Quomodo es? Quid agis? Quomodo te habes?
7
votes
2answers
22k views

Is my interpretation of “Ad Astra per Aspera” correct?

I came across the phrase ad astra per aspera — "to the stars through difficulties." I think I know what it means, but my interpretation appears to be at odds with others. For example: The ...
6
votes
1answer
88 views

Is “The beginning is half of every action” truly a Greek proverb?

I found in a book from 2015 a box with the quote: The beginning is half of every action. (Greek proverb) I googled it and there are many "pop websites" with the same quote. But none with a ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

How to parse “semper eadem” grammatically?

The phrase semper eadem, "always the same", is a fairly popular motto. It is easy enough to interpret semantically, but I could not convince myself about the exact grammatical interpretation of the ...
9
votes
3answers
763 views

Are there Latin words for hair color?

English words like "brunette", "blonde", and "redhead" refer to people of a particular hair color. Are there similar words in Latin? It is easy to express hair color in English or Latin with several ...
4
votes
1answer
182 views

What do you say in Latin when something sucks?

In English you can say: "This job/movie/party/[anything] sucks!" This is a concise and slightly profane way of expressing displeasure. Is there something similar in Latin? The corresponding Finnish ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar - Could some one please help to translate this

Could someone please help to transtale "Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar" to English? Many thanks and best regards, Phuong
1
vote
1answer
52 views

My boy, my woman, my man, my girl

What would be the meaning for "my girl", "my man", "my boy", "my woman" in Latin? If I use filia tua, it means you daughter, but could be used as puella tua to mean the same, or is there other ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

Is it possible to use a prepositional phrase with a gerundive/gerund?

can we use prepositional phrases (like "de domo") linked to a gerund or a gerundive, can it act as an object?
5
votes
1answer
273 views

May they rest in peace

This may become an inscription written on a historical marker commemorating a mass grave. Which of the following is correct: Requiesce in Pace or Requiescant in Pace? The former was offered up by a ...
8
votes
3answers
527 views

How to say “elämä kantaa” or “life will prevail”?

How can one translate the Finnish phrase "elämä kantaa" or "elämä voittaa" to Latin? The literal English translations are "life carries" and "life wins". The first phrase means roughly "even in hard ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

Finer Tuning on Expressions-of-Time

Qs have been asked about expressions-of-time, of the type: "in the second year" = "secondo anno"; "within three days" = "tribus diebus"; "for two years" = "(per) duos annos" ("per" is optional) which ...
6
votes
2answers
111 views

Looking a gift horse in the mouth

A common phrase for mistrust towards a given gift is looking a gift horse in the mouth. As explained in Wiktionary (linked above), the saying goes back to the New Testament via St. Jerome's Latin ...
4
votes
1answer
968 views

What is the opposite of “aegrescit medendo”?

There is a well-known Latin phrase, aegrescit medendo, which means, "worsens with treatment". I believe it comes from Virgil (correct me if I am wrong). I wanted to know if there is an attested phrase ...
7
votes
1answer
871 views

Idiom for “I came, I saw, I ate” (or drank)

I'm trying to follow the "ee" sound pattern at the end of each word in the idiom "veni, vidi, vici" with translations of the following: I came, I saw, I ate: Veni, Vidi, Edi I came, I saw, I drank: ...
23
votes
3answers
11k views

How did the Romans say “good night”?

There are a lot of different things in a lot of different languages that mean basically the same thing: Sleep well. English: Sleep tight, don't let the bedbugs bite Italiano: Buona notte, sogni d'oro ...
3
votes
2answers
83 views

Two by four meters in size

If I want to describe the dimensions of my office, I might say that it is about two by four meters. How do I phrase this size, "two by four meters", in Latin? I don't just want to say that the area ...
6
votes
0answers
82 views

Is there any database on idiomatic expressions in Latin?

It is often said that one has an excellent command of a language when one is able to use it in an idiomatic way, which typically involves making use of Idioms and Collocations, i.a. There are many ...
4
votes
1answer
63 views

“Any thoughts” in Latin

How would one translate "any thoughts?" into Latin? It is an ellipse for "does anyone have any thoughts?" I would think "ullas cogitationes?" for "Aliquis ullas cogitationes habet?"
5
votes
2answers
469 views

“A killed B” translation

I hope this is the correct place to ask, I have 0 experience with Latin but need this one phrase translated. "A killed B" as in "Tom killed John". From what I understand, for my context the best ...
3
votes
0answers
71 views

“Laughing our heads off” in Latin

As a follow-up of an interesting question on a typological classification of Latin (Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed or verb-framed? ), I was wondering if Latin has (semi)idiomatic ...
2
votes
1answer
78 views

In high enough pressure shit becomes a diamond

I have this proverb I use quite commonly. I was wondering what it would be in latin. Can you help me? *"In high enough pressure even shit becomes a diamond."
11
votes
4answers
1k views

How do I address an email in Latin to my Latin professor?

How do I address an email in Latin to my Latin professor? How is the greeting supposed to look?
7
votes
0answers
573 views

Meaning of “quod si”

I'm having trouble with quod sī. L&S offers, under the definition of quod, With other particles, as si, nisi, utinam, ubi, etc., always with reference to something which precedes (very freq.), ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Phrasing “it says” or “it reads”

I occasionally want to say something like: Did you see the sign? It says: beware of the dog. How can I phrase "it says" in Latin? In English one can say "it says" or "it reads", and the direct ...
13
votes
6answers
15k views

How did the Romans wish good birthday?

I know how to wish a happy birthday in Latin: Bonum diem natalem! (There are other options as well.) It just occurred to me that I do not recall coming across any ancient birthday congratulations. Do ...
5
votes
1answer
98 views

“On the run” in Latin

Is there a Latin equivalent to the English phrase "on the run" to indicate someone who's avoiding capture/recapture? For example, "The prisoner is on the run." Would something like in fuga be ...
6
votes
2answers
181 views

Translating “God knows how much/long” and similar

Consider these examples: Mr. Johnson has been the janitor for God knows how long. Right behind this park is the new bridge that cost God knows how much. You can replace "God knows how" with "...
2
votes
2answers
123 views

Pro paganos civitate est civitate dei

I want to say 'the City of God is established by the existence of (aggresive) pagans. What would be the grammatical and elegant (in the style of St. Augustine) way of saying this in Latin? I am ...
6
votes
2answers
288 views

“Explaining oneself” in Classical Latin

How should I say in Classical Latin the following phrases? "Explain yourself!" "I didn't explain myself well", "I didn't make myself / wasn't clear" I've been thinking of the verbs explico and ...
10
votes
2answers
711 views

Hogwarts Motto from J.K. Rowling's “Harry Potter” series

Hogwarts, the School of Witchcraft and Wizardry in the Harry Potter books, has the following Latin motto: Draco dormiens numquam titillandus. Most online sources translate this as "Never tickle a ...
4
votes
2answers
144 views

Translation of “Do it for her”

Could someone help me translate "Do it for her" into Latin? Context: The "it" refers to keep working, fighting, striving, while "her" actually refers to two persons; sometimes individually (so I'd ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Socratic Paradox

According to the Wikipedia page of the Socratic paradox 'I know that I know nothing', Latin version of the same is — 'Scio me nescire' (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_know_that_I_know_nothing). ...
28
votes
7answers
12k views

How do you say “please” in Classical Latin?

I'm wondering how to say "please" in Classical Latin like "please" as in "can I PLEASE have that?" or "PLEASE go away" or something like that.
1
vote
1answer
366 views

Why is the phrase “horror vacui” commonly interpreted as “nature abhors a vacuum”?

Why is the Latin phrase: horror vacui commonly interpreted as: nature abhors a vacuum? It may well be Aristotle's intended message, given the context, but it seems like a bit of a jump. Doesn't it? ...
11
votes
2answers
380 views

How to speak a language with a third declension adjective?

Most Latin adjectives related to names of countries and languages are of first and second declension: Latinus, Graecus, Anglicus… If I want to express that I speak in any such language, I will ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

Latin original for “Would you have a great empire?” saying, by Publilius Syrus

Can someone provide the original Latin translation for Publilius Syrus's famous axiom, "Would you have a great empire? Rule over yourself." I have searched online and not been able to find it in Latin....
5
votes
4answers
540 views

Idiom like “Fair enough!”

If someone disagrees with you and the argument makes you change your opinion, you might say "Fair enough!" in English. This seems to be essentially equivalent to "Oh, good point! I agree." Is there a ...
2
votes
2answers
61 views

How to translate “Argument To Proof of Work”

Is the following the correct way to translate Argument To Proof of Work Argumentum Ad Probationem Operis The intention is to translate it in the same way as Argument to the Person Argumentum Ad ...