Questions tagged [idiom]

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Meaning of “quod si”

I'm having trouble with quod sī. L&S offers, under the definition of quod, With other particles, as si, nisi, utinam, ubi, etc., always with reference to something which precedes (very freq.), ...
4
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0answers
50 views

An idiom for “on the road”

I spend much of my time travelling, and that brings all kinds of challenges. For example, it can be hard to follow my preferred diet and I don't have access to my books. How could I express such ...
4
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75 views

Attempting to preemptively disqualify retort

If I were to say: The sky is falling! It undeniably false to claim that I am overreacting, as my detractors are sure to do. Is there a common Latin phrase that encapsulates that, the tactic or ...
3
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27 views

To throw is human

So, if "To err is human" translates to Errare humanum est, what would be a good translation for "To throw (a stone or projectile) is human"? I'm looking at proicere humanum est and ...
3
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0answers
82 views

What fresh hell is this?

“What fresh hell is this?” is a question frequently uttered (or so it has been reported) by writer Dorothy Parker, on such occasions as when the doorbell or the telephone rang, expressing her ...
3
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79 views

“Laughing our heads off” in Latin

As a follow-up of an interesting question on a typological classification of Latin (Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed or verb-framed? ), I was wondering if Latin has (semi)idiomatic ...
2
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0answers
74 views

The proverb, “Talk bad about me, talk good, but just talk”

I once heard a phrase in Latin, as indicated in the title, whose context was that of people seeking a shabby kind of popularity or reputation in any of its forms.
2
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256 views

What is “sense of humour” in Latin?

What would be a good classical Latin translation of "sense of humour"? I can find words for "humour", but I am not sure how to go about "sense of". Would one of the humour words be adequate on its own ...
2
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66 views

What is “cold war”?

How should I translate "cold war" in Latin? I can see two ways to approach this, using a classical phrase for a similar hostile political situation, or finding a suitable adjective for "cold" to go ...
1
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0answers
48 views

Is it possible to use a prepositional phrase with a gerundive/gerund?

can we use prepositional phrases (like "de domo") linked to a gerund or a gerundive, can it act as an object?