Questions tagged [idiom]

For questions concerning expressions, word-plays, symbolic language, metaphors and the likes.

14 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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7
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Roman wedding congratulations

How did the Romans congratulate a couple on their wedding day? The concepts of wedding and marriage were not quite what they are now back then, but I assume that celebrations and congratulations were ...
6
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40 views

How to say "in all fairness" or "to be fair" in latin?

I am very new to Latin. I was wondering how you'd say something like "in all fairness" or "to be fair" in Latin. I have been searching for the answer for hours and I couldn't find ...
6
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0answers
84 views

Is there a Latin idiom equivalent to "great minds think alike"?

In English we have the idiom great minds think alike, which we usually use when two people coincidentally have the same idea at the same time. It's taken in a jovial manner and not as a serious ...
6
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0answers
54 views

Rolling your eyes

There is a common gesture: when we find something tiresome, when a perfectly avoidable annoyance was -- again! -- not avoided, when we know what is coming and wish it didn't ... we roll our eyes 🙄 ...
5
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0answers
51 views

Roman words to describe suicide

The Romans did not have a single word to describe suicide; that is a modern (by our standards) invention. There was the expression mors voluntāria, volitional death. They also had verbal phrases, such ...
5
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0answers
75 views

"From beyond the grave"

When someone does something after death — such as causing harm by their will — they can be said to act "from beyond the grave". Is there a similar idiom in Latin? Any era will do, although ...
5
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0answers
86 views

Well, well, well

How to say this expression in Latin!? Expressing surprise: Well, well, well! It is here (when smth lost and found)! Expressing sarcasm: Well, well, well... And what now!? Expressing begining: Well, ...
4
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0answers
53 views

An idiom for "on the road"

I spend much of my time travelling, and that brings all kinds of challenges. For example, it can be hard to follow my preferred diet and I don't have access to my books. How could I express such ...
4
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0answers
81 views

Attempting to preemptively disqualify retort

If I were to say: The sky is falling! It undeniably false to claim that I am overreacting, as my detractors are sure to do. Is there a common Latin phrase that encapsulates that, the tactic or ...
3
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0answers
124 views

What fresh hell is this?

“What fresh hell is this?” is a question frequently uttered (or so it has been reported) by writer Dorothy Parker, on such occasions as when the doorbell or the telephone rang, expressing her ...
3
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108 views

"Laughing our heads off" in Latin

As a follow-up of an interesting question on a typological classification of Latin (Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed or verb-framed? ), I was wondering if Latin has (semi)idiomatic ...
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55 views

Is it possible to use a prepositional phrase with a gerundive/gerund?

can we use prepositional phrases (like "de domo") linked to a gerund or a gerundive, can it act as an object?
2
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69 views

What is "cold war"?

How should I translate "cold war" in Latin? I can see two ways to approach this, using a classical phrase for a similar hostile political situation, or finding a suitable adjective for "cold" to go ...
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46 views

idiom: Pro convento nostro proximo

In the novice book, Musici Bremae, the author several times uses a phrase that appears to be some kind of idiom. For example: Gratias ago. Pro convento nostro proximo. What does this mean?