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Questions tagged [horatius]

For questions about Quintus Horatius Flaccus or Horace (65–27 BC) and his work.

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4
votes
1answer
41 views

Understanding a sacrifice in Horace's carmen 1.5

In Carmina 1, poem 5, Horace writes about an untrustworthy and seducing lady. He ends the poem in: (...) Me tabula sacer votiva paries indicat uvida suspendisse potenti vestimenta maris deo. ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

Origin of “seize the day” as a translation of Horace's carpe diem

Even many people who have never studied Latin know the phrase carpe diem (from Horace's Odes 1.11), and can tell you that it means "seize the day". But "seize" is not a very close translation of ...
5
votes
1answer
305 views

On the word order of “Sapere aude”

In putting together his dictum, Horace, as a native speaker of Latin, perhaps instinctively chose to put first the word "sapere," and then the word "aude," even if, strictly grammatically speaking, "...
7
votes
1answer
319 views

“Desinat in piscem” in Horace's Ars Poetica: morphology or looks or what exactly?

This is about the core meaning of desinat in piscem as in: Humano capiti ceruicem pictor equinam iungere si uelit et uarias inducere plumas undique collatis membris, ut turpiter atrum desinat ...
5
votes
0answers
119 views

“Purissimum penem” in Suetonius's Life of Horace

Suetonius, in his Vita Horati, reports that the emperor Augustus jokingly referred to Horace as a purissimus penis: Praeterea saepe eum inter alios iocos purissimum penem et homuncionem ...
6
votes
1answer
119 views

Who are Maecenas' atavi?

The first verse of the first ode in the first book of odes by Horatius is Maecenas atavis edite regibus You Maecenas, who descend from great-great-great-grandfathers that were kings Who are ...
12
votes
2answers
199 views

Why would avoiding olive oil be a negative thing?

In Horace's Odes 1.8, Horace criticizes his ex's new boyfriend by saying, among other things, that: ...olivum sanguine viperino cautius vitat... which, roughly, means He avoids olive oil more ...
14
votes
2answers
397 views

What does “quibus intemptata nites” (Odes 1.5.10–11) mean?

I'm currently reading Horace's Odes 1.5, and on lines 10–11 there's an odd construction: ...Miseri, quibus intemptata nites... Now, as far as I can tell, this literally means "Wretched people, ...