Questions tagged [hebrew]

Questions should be related to Latin or Greek, not only about Hebrew. Hebrew is a Northwest Semitic language that, as a regional language of the ancient Middle East and a holy language of Judaism and Christianity, has had significant influences on Latin and Greek.

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1answer
115 views

Pronunciation of Jehovæ

The Tremellius and Junio's Bible in Is. 60:1-2 renders the Hebrew name of God (יהוה) as Jehovæ. how is this word properly pronounced in Latin? Thanks!
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2answers
145 views

Is the Abrahamic god ever named in Classical-era Latin or Greek?

As far as I'm aware, the Septuagint, New Testament, and Vulgata never directly transcribe the Tetragrammaton (יהוה) into Greek or Latin: they substitute in words like κύριος/dominus "lord" or θεός/...
8
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1answer
122 views

Identifying a type of dog transliterated from Latin to Hebrew

This post relates to a medieval Jewish scholar who uses what I believe to be transliterated Latin in his work. Below I provide some basic background to his comment, with the main question beginning ...
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0answers
69 views

Gen 1:28 only animals that move or all living beings?

The book of Genesis, 1:28 reads: Crescite et multiplicamini et replete terram et subicite eam et dominamini piscibus maris et volatilibus caeli et universis animantibus, quae moventur super terram ...
7
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1answer
255 views

What are the conventions for transcribing Semitic languages into Greek?

The surviving Koine Greek corpus contains quite a lot of transcribed Semitic words, borrowed from Hebrew, Aramaic, and maybe others. (For example, the LXX is full of Hebrew names.) Were there ...
5
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2answers
279 views

Does any Greek word have a geminate consonant after a long vowel?

I recently noticed a pattern in loans from Hebrew into Greek: the letter šin (or sin, or łin if you're really archaic) is transcribed σσ after a short vowel, σ elsewhere. My knowledge of Classical ...
5
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1answer
84 views

From which Greek dialect did Hebrew borrow *awēr* “air”?

The Hebrew for "air" is אוויר avir, earlier awīr or awēr. This is obviously a borrowing of the Greek word that appears in Attic as ἀήρ, and would be ἀϝήρ in other dialects. The Hebrew word must have ...
2
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1answer
127 views

Understanding the use of “regnavit”

Regnavit is the third-person singular perfect active indicative of rēgnō (Wiktionary) Now, many times this word translated as if present, regnat, which is puzzling. For example, consider Psalm ...
8
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2answers
156 views

Why choose σ versus σσ in Hebrew loans?

The LXX provides a wide variety of Hebrew, Aramaic, and other Semitic words transcribed into Greek. Most of the transcriptions are straightforward: the letter lamedh ל, for example, is always ...
13
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1answer
185 views

Why did Hieronymus choose to use Latin tenses that don't exist in Hebrew when translating for the Vulgata?

Nisi Dominus ædificaverit domum, in vanum laboraverunt qui ædificant eam. [psalm 126:1] I am pretty sure that classical Hebrew has no future perfect tense, so how did Jerome arrive at his ...
12
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1answer
310 views

Does “ad” have its origin in Hebrew/Semitic languages?

The sources I've read usually say that 'ad' (i.e., in 'ad infinitum') is derived from Proto-Indo-European *ád ‎("near, at"). However, they don't refer any Semitic origins. But here's an excerpt from ...