Questions tagged [grammar-identification]

Use this tag when asking about a grammatical structure you cannot name and want explained.

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11
votes
1answer
589 views

What's the difference between mutantur and mutamur?

A quote by John Owen: Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis. I was wondering if you could tell me the difference between mutantur and mutamur?
9
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2answers
407 views

A list of the categories and subcategories of the Latin conjunctions

I am learning Latin. I have bought a grammar book, which is not that great. My professor is using words like adversative conjunction, comparative, conditional, and so on. I can't find any long list ...
6
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2answers
3k views

The three maxims at the Temple of Apollo (Greek)

There were three maxims carved into the Temple of Apollo at Delphi: γνῶθι σεαυτόν (know thyself) μηδὲν ἄγαν (nothing in excess) Ἐγγύα πάρα δ'ἄτη (a pledge comes from folly) The first two maxims make ...
4
votes
1answer
121 views

Why is the relative pronoun put in the dative case? why feminine? (Greek)

I was a little stumped, here, when I came across the feminine relative pronoun ᾗ. ἴσως δή, εἶπον, παρὰ τὸ ἔθος γελοῖα ἂν φαίνοιτο πολλὰ περὶ τὰ νῦν λεγόμενα, εἰ πράξεται ᾗ λέγεται. καὶ μάλα, ...
11
votes
2answers
811 views

What is the significance of the different declensions and conjugations?

I've been slowly trying to teach myself Latin with the help of this site. I've gone past the parts where it talks about first, second, third etc declension nouns, and it all seems quite arbitrary as ...
7
votes
2answers
411 views

What's it called when a verb shares the same root as its object or modifier?

I have noticed in both Greek and Latin that sometimes a verb shares the same root as its object or modifier. This construction looks funny to me as an English speaker, as we don't often encounter this ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

Proper parsing of “respondeo dicendum quod”

Anyone who has read the Scholastics, such as St. Thomas Aquinas, are familiar with the basic structure of an articulus: (Here's an example.) Objections ("videtur quod...") Quote from authority ("sed ...
10
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2answers
239 views

What does “illos” refer to in this passage from Seneca?

While researching an answer for this question, I came across the following passage from Seneca. The bolded part, particularly "illos", left me with some doubts about the sentence syntax: Et quid ...
9
votes
1answer
523 views

'Credo' with dative problem

Here is a small problem with 'credo', there is an example in my dictionary saying that 'crede mihi (dat.)' means 'believe me'. Gildersleeve & Lodge gives credere under Dative with Intransitive ...
6
votes
1answer
80 views

Does 'concrescere' take dative?

I wonder is 'rigido rostro' here in dative or ablative? Under "Dative and verbs compounded with prepositions" (Gildersleeve & Lodge) it is said, that " Many verbs compounded with the prepositions ...
9
votes
1answer
209 views

How to understand 'quae prosum sola nocendo'?

There is a line in Ovid's Metamorphoses II 519, which I don't understand at all (Juno's complaint) 'quaeritis, aetheriis quare regina deorum sedibus huc adsim? pro me tenet altera caelum! ...
6
votes
1answer
114 views

'Subiecit' meaning in Ovid Metamorphoses III 167?

Here is a line in Ovid which I find confusing: quo postquam subiit, nympharum tradidit uni armigerae iaculum pharetramque arcusque retentos, altera depositae subiecit bracchia pallae, vincla ...
4
votes
1answer
134 views

Dative of Personal Interest?

In this line in Ovid Metamorphoses Book III. 505, is fratri put in the Dative because ' of the person in whose honour, or interest, or advantage or for whose pleasure, an action takes place, or the ...
3
votes
1answer
165 views

Infinitive ' habere ' usage in this sentence

How to understand a meaning of the infinitive 'habere' here, is it here as a subject (The Infinitive as a Subject, Gildersleeve & Lodge, page 275)? Nam cum posse existere potentia sit, sequitur ...
6
votes
1answer
421 views

How are adjectives shown to agree in gender with a noun?

So I just learned about adjectives needing to agree with their nouns in gender. If I understood correctly, an adjective that is considered to be feminine will be known because of the kind of ...
8
votes
1answer
251 views

Formation of participles from deponent verbs

Here I have the deponent verb persequor, persequi, persecutus sum, persecutum. Following standard deponent rules, I am able to form the following (apparently these active participles are active in ...
7
votes
1answer
286 views

Part(s) of speech of words and correct listing forms of “pauci, paucae, pauca”

The Cambridge Latin Course Dictionary lists the words pauci, paucae, pauca which I assume are adjectives, and it is defined as "few, a few". I cannot find this listing in the same form on wikitionary, ...
12
votes
1answer
307 views

Understanding the grammar: «illis Evangelii nuntiandi praebens mandatum»

The following is the Latin text from the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC), Prologue, Chapter 1, Section 2: 2 Ut haec vocatio in toto resonaret orbe, Christus Apostolos misit, quos elegerat, ...
5
votes
1answer
49 views

Concerning the Verbal “From”

I am attempting to translate a text from english to latin, and am unsure how to translate the word from when it is used in the context of a verb. An example would be: "I took from him..."; another ...
10
votes
2answers
2k views

How to translate the phrase “perfacile factu esse”?

I'm having a hard time translating this phrase from Caesar's De Bello Gallico. I understand, from doing a bit of research, that probat illis introduces indirect speech. Perfacile factu esse illis ...
11
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2answers
8k views

Ars gratia artis

I would like to know the meaning of the following Latin expression, as well as a grammatical analysis of the individual words in this context: ARS GRATIA ARTIS as it appears in the following logo ...
4
votes
2answers
337 views

Why is the Greek definite article τη duplicated in this sentence?

I was translating a simplified version of Two Friends and a Bear, one of Aesop's fables, listed as #65 in the Perry Index. The text begins with the sentence: Δυο φιλοι τη ὁδω τη εἰς την χωραν ...
4
votes
1answer
193 views

“Nequidquam seros exercet noctua cantus”: what is the Latin onomatopoeia for the owl's hoot?

In the 16th century, Robert et Antoine Lechevallier d'Aigneaux made a famous translation of Virgil's Aeneid which was seemingly praised in the French world; they also translated the Georgics including ...
6
votes
1answer
108 views

Is the coordinating conjunction necessary in a parallel series of terms?

I just finished translating line 6 of Bellum Gallicum, Book I Ch. I, and the absence of a coordinating conjunction at the end made me wonder. Belgae ab extremis Galliae finibus oriuntur, pertinent ...
6
votes
1answer
67 views

“Ut” in Livy XXI via LLpsi

In an excerpt from Livy XXI, Lingua Latina per se illustrata has this: . . . Haud ferme plures Saguntini cadebant quam Pœni. Ut vero Hannibal ipse, dum murum incautius subit, tragula graviter ictus ...
9
votes
1answer
200 views

Active verbs with passive meanings

Every beginning Latin-learner is familiar with the idea of deponent verbs: verbs that have passive forms but active meanings. I am curious about a small subset of Latin verbs that aren't just ...
13
votes
5answers
616 views

Causatives in Latin

Many languages I know of have a way of making causative constructions. For example, English uses "make" or "have": I make you do something or have you do something, or even cause you to do something. ...
10
votes
2answers
354 views

In the title “Ars Goetia,” is “Goetia” an appositive noun?

Ars Goetia is a well-known book about demonology written in Mediaeval Latin. I'm having trouble analyzing the grammatical structure of the title. Ars is a feminine noun in the singular nominative form....
6
votes
1answer
231 views

“omniaque perpeti ipsa” in De Finibus

In De Finibus 48, Cicero writes Qui ingenuis studiis atque artibus delectantur, nonne videmus eos nec valetudinis nec rei familiaris habere rationem omniaque perpeti ipsa cognitione et scientia ...
8
votes
2answers
859 views

How do you parse “futurum est” in Matthew 2:13?

I'm a little confused about a verse in Matthew 2 of the Vulgate Bible. Futurum est enim ut Herodes quærat puerum ad perdendum eum. (Matthew 2:13) Douay-Rheims translates this as, "For it will ...
9
votes
2answers
124 views

How is “quod” operating in this sentence of Hyginus?

The first sentence of Hyginus' Prometheus is: Hominés anteá ab immortálibus ignem petébant neque in perpetuum serváre sciébant; quod posteá Prometheus in ferulá détulit in terrás, hominibusque ...
13
votes
1answer
91 views

Why “impressa” in Æneid IV.659–60?

So Dido's almost finished her long, drawn-out suicide scene, and we get the lines Dīxit, et ōs impressa torō, "Moriēmur inultae, sed moriāmur," ait. It seems like impressa is being used here as ...
8
votes
1answer
72 views

How do I understand “victís” and “imperitátum” in this sentence from Livy XXI?

In Róma Æterna (second volume of Lingua Latína per sé illustráta), p. 209, in a discussion of Hannibal adapted from Livy book XXI, contains the following sentence: Odiís etiam prope májóribus ...
15
votes
4answers
994 views

Is the Phrase “Sola Dea Fatum Novit” Proper Latin?

I have seen this sentence translated as both "Only the Goddess knows fate" and "Only the Goddess knows their fate". That aside, I remember someone telling me that this was not correct Latin, and it ...
18
votes
2answers
404 views

Nonne “a fortiori, a priori, a posteriori” solecismi sunt?

Are the terms a fortiori, a priori, and a posteriori bad Latin? If so, how and when did they become established? I understand that the dative case never takes a preposition in Latin—a most welcome ...

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