Questions tagged [grammar-identification]

Use this tag when asking about a grammatical structure you cannot name and want explained.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
5
votes
2answers
310 views

On the (typical?) ambiguity of “Porta clausa est”

It is often said that Porta clausa est can have two readings depending on the categorial nature of the participle: verbal (cf. clauditur/clausa est) or adjectival (cf. clausa est/clausa fuit), which ...
19
votes
2answers
498 views

Nonne “a fortiori, a priori, a posteriori” solecismi sunt?

Are the terms a fortiori, a priori, and a posteriori bad Latin? If so, how and when did they become established? I understand that the dative case never takes a preposition in Latin—a most welcome ...
8
votes
2answers
277 views

Can the supine ablative be used for motion?

I came across an Asterix translated into Latin. In the first story page the village chief notices that Asterix and Obelix return from a hunt and says: Asterix atque Obelix venatu redeunt! My question ...
3
votes
2answers
87 views

Using genitive and infinitive to describe characteristics

Answering this question, I recalled a somewhat rare construction used to express that an action is characteristic of someone. Pekkanen's Ars Grammatica (§77.1) gives two examples: Cuiusvis hominis ...
14
votes
2answers
11k views

Ars gratia artis

I would like to know the meaning of the following Latin expression, as well as a grammatical analysis of the individual words in this context: ARS GRATIA ARTIS as it appears in the following logo ...
9
votes
1answer
249 views

Active verbs with passive meanings

Every beginning Latin-learner is familiar with the idea of deponent verbs: verbs that have passive forms but active meanings. I am curious about a small subset of Latin verbs that aren't just ...
5
votes
2answers
219 views

How often is “et” used as an adverb, and what might distinguish that usage?

The conjunction et, in addition to its common use as a coordinating conjunction meaning and, can also be used adverbially, encompassing similar meanings as those found in words like etiam, item, etc. ...
11
votes
2answers
988 views

What is the significance of the different declensions and conjugations?

I've been slowly trying to teach myself Latin with the help of this site. I've gone past the parts where it talks about first, second, third etc declension nouns, and it all seems quite arbitrary as ...
10
votes
4answers
8k views

“Et in terra pax hominibus bona voluntas” [sic!]

I have a German Christmas song of the 16th century, which is bilingual, German–Latin. The lyrics go as follows (I translated the German parts into English): O how beautiful the group of ...
9
votes
1answer
631 views

'Credo' with dative problem

Here is a small problem with 'credo', there is an example in my dictionary saying that 'crede mihi (dat.)' means 'believe me'. Gildersleeve & Lodge gives credere under Dative with Intransitive ...
7
votes
3answers
332 views

Grammatical structure of “Obsidibus imperatis centum hos Haeduis custodiendos tradit”

@Mitomino points out in this comment that my understanding of what modifies what in the sentence shown below from De Bello Gallico (VI.4.3) is mistaken. I'll diagram my understanding below. Can you ...
7
votes
1answer
117 views

Is “rogamur ab eo ut veniamus” grammatically correct?

It is grammatically correct if I turn any Main active verb in the Indirect commands into passive ones? Active - rogat nos ut veniamus - He asks us to come. Passive - " rogamur ab eo ut veniamus &...
6
votes
1answer
230 views

The function of “quo” in “Quō quisque est sollertior, hōc docet īrācundius”

In A&G on indefinite pronouns there are two sentences of a similar structure: Bonus liber melior est quisque quō mâior. (The larger a good book is, the better.) Quō quisque est sollertior, hōc ...
6
votes
3answers
365 views

grammar of “sapientiae tuae non est numerus”

in Confessions we read: magnus es, domine, et laudabilis valde. magna virtus tua et sapientiae tuae non est numerus. while the meaning is quite clear, I can't clearly resolve the literal ...
6
votes
1answer
85 views

Does 'concrescere' take dative?

I wonder is 'rigido rostro' here in dative or ablative? Under "Dative and verbs compounded with prepositions" (Gildersleeve & Lodge) it is said, that " Many verbs compounded with the prepositions ...
5
votes
1answer
186 views

How to say: “X differs from Y by(in) Z”

I want to say something of this sort: The word "res" differs from the word "rex" by one letter. In "Lexicon totius Latinitatis" I saw under the term "dama": "[Dama] differt a capreis solis ...
5
votes
0answers
67 views

“Renegatus”: an active perfect participle from a non-deponent verb?

Several dictionaries' etymologies of English "renegade" trace it to Medieval Latin renegatus, an apostate, one who has denied his religion and gone back to another. Renegatus in turn is the ...
5
votes
2answers
769 views

The Purpose of “Natu”

Following on from the question "Using Genitive & Infinitive To Describe Characteristics"; Joonas (26/6/19): "adulescentis est maiores natu revereri." = "It is of a young person to respect his/ her ...
12
votes
1answer
334 views

Understanding the grammar: «illis Evangelii nuntiandi praebens mandatum»

The following is the Latin text from the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC), Prologue, Chapter 1, Section 2: 2 Ut haec vocatio in toto resonaret orbe, Christus Apostolos misit, quos elegerat, ...
12
votes
2answers
313 views

Understanding the stem(s) of 'struere'

The present, perfect, and participle stems1 of the verb struere are stru-, strux-, and struct-. The -s- in the perfect stem and the -t- in the participle stem are nothing unusual, but they seem to ...
8
votes
2answers
634 views

Where is the correct position to set right or left of muscle names for anatomical names?

Muscles and bones have Latin names as can be found on wikipedia. I need to name muscles and bones with their Latin name and I also need to specify if it's the left or the right muscle in the human ...
3
votes
1answer
99 views

Syntax of Ille: “numquam est ille miser cui facile est mori”

What is the syntax of ille in the sentence: "numquam est ille miser cui facile est mori"? I get that cui is indirect object, but what is the function of the demonstrative pronoun ille in the sentence?
2
votes
1answer
86 views

What construction is used with φάθι εἶναι? (Plat. Rep. 6.508e)

I think I have the gist of this short sentence, but I would like a little more clarity on one detail. What construction is governing the phrase φάθι εἶναι? I have parsed φάθι as the 2nd singular ...