Questions tagged [grammar-choice]

When asking which choice (case, tense, mood etc.) is grammatical in a given situation, use this tag.

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7
votes
1answer
613 views

Fieri potest with final ut or explicative quod

Suppose I want to say: It can happen that my horse dies. I do not want to say "my horse can die", but I want to keep this structure where the thing that happens is in a subordinate clause. ...
10
votes
2answers
545 views

How to answer a question?

Respondere looks like a good verb for answering, but how can I say "to answer a question"? I failed to find an answer by looking at dictionaries. These options come to mind: quaestionem respondere in ...
12
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3answers
480 views

How to resolve ambiguity with reflexive pronouns

A comment to an answer of this question mentions that ambiguity can arise with a reflexive pronoun when both the independent clause and the clause with the reflexive pronoun have third-person subjects....
8
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1answer
107 views

How to describe ministers in Latin?

I want to talk about different ministers in a government in Latin. Minister and ministra are good words for a minister, but how to say "minister of justice and employment" and "minister of economic ...
9
votes
1answer
354 views

When to use a genitive pronoun instead of a possessive adjective

The genitive form of the personal pronouns (e.g. mei, tui, nostri, nostrum, etc.) seem to occur fairly often in the following contexts: Partitive genitive: to indicate a part of some whole. Quis ...
9
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1answer
1k views

How to emphasize adjectives?

In English, and most modern European languages, we have one single word, "very," which is accepted as the regular way to make an adjective more extreme. Is there a common way to do this in Latin? Ways ...
4
votes
2answers
169 views

Is "lingua Latina studenda pergit" grammatical?

I want to say "people continue to study Latin", and I came up with lingua Latina studenda pergit. Is such a combination gerundive and pergere grammatical? It must be understandable, but I do not ...
4
votes
0answers
226 views

Are causal relative clauses stylistically preferred to causal clauses?

In Latin a relative clause can be causal and the causal nature can be emphasized with quippe, ut, utpote or praesertim. A causal relative clause can always be replaced with a causal clause, but not ...
5
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1answer
181 views

Does using quippe in a relative clause require conjunctive?

One can insert the particle quippe in a relative clause to give it a causal or otherwise explaining tone.1 Does quippe require using conjunctive in the relative clause? If not, are there some rules ...
8
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2answers
579 views

Choosing -ter or -iter for adverbs from third declension adjectives

The typical suffix to derive an adverb from a third declension adjective is -iter, but sometimes the -i- is dropped: dulciter but audacter. I am not asking for a rule for choosing -iter or -ter —...
8
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2answers
156 views

How to decline a business name that is a Latin sentence?

Suppose there were a podiatry practice named Pes Integer Sit. How would you put this into a complete sentence? Do you simply treat it as indeclinable? For example, would "I am going to Pes Integer ...
8
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1answer
253 views

Comparison of Adjective to Noun

My friend wrote this fake holy scripture passage for his nation's religion on NationStates, and I have been translating it into Latin, as any proper fake holy scripture should be. I came upon one part ...
14
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2answers
851 views

Memento quod <subjunctive>

(A tangent off of a question and comment by David Charles.) This verse from roughly the ninth century: Memento rerum conditor, Nostri quod olim corporis Sacrata ab alvo Virginis Nascendo ...
8
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2answers
577 views

When can the gerund take an object?

Typically the gerundive is employed when one using a gerund with an object seems possible. For example, I have understood that aqua bibenda est and rei faciendae causa are preferable to aquam bibendum ...
8
votes
2answers
589 views

Latin for English "has been" + adjective?

I'm trying to say in Latin, "Our garden has been full of junk for three years" and I can't figure out what tense to put the verb in. In English, "has been" expresses present tense with perfective ...
10
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1answer
261 views

How to write a sentence with two genitives describing one noun

I would like to translate the following sentence into Latin. Minerva is the goddess of wisdom and of wool. My first guess would be, Minerva est dea sapientiae et lanae. But I'm not sure ...
9
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1answer
2k views

When to use the Greek accusative?

The Greek accusative or the accusative of respect (accusativus Graecus or accusativus respectus) is used like the ablative of respect (ablativus respectus). This construction is a loan from Greek, ...
6
votes
2answers
152 views

Can the verb auxiliari take an accusative object?

The verb auxiliari is used with dative to indicate the entity that benefits from the help. For example, tibi auxilior means "I help you". Can use an accusative object to express how the help is given? ...
7
votes
1answer
211 views

Does the name take the same case as "appellatus"?

Consider the following sentence with a tentative Latin translation: Let us meet in the building called Taberna. Conveniamus in aedificio Taberna appellato. In which case should I decline the ...
10
votes
1answer
808 views

Difference between Vocative and Accusative usage

What is the grammatical difference between saying something like Bonam Fortunam (in the accusative) and Bona Fortuna (in the vocative) to another person? I have always heard the former, and I do not ...
9
votes
1answer
233 views

Usage of adjective solus

I'm trying to translate the sentence "The whole state was thanking this man's brother alone." (that is, the brother the only one being thanked) My try is: Tota civitas fratri huius soli gratias agebat....
11
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2answers
290 views

Can Latin "inde" introduce a temporal clause?

Lines one and two of book 2 of Vergil's Aeneid sparked this question: Conticuere omnes intentique ora tenebant inde toro pater Aeneas sic orsus ab alto: I had two interpretations. My first ...
16
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2answers
1k views

What is the difference between -us and -io?

One can derive nouns from verbs by attaching -us or -io to the perfect participle stem. For example, movere gives rise to motus (fourth declension) and motio. The meanings of these derived words are ...
12
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3answers
2k views

What is the correct way to say "Noctis Avem"?

I'm looking to use "Night bird" as a name or title for something. I don't know which, if any, of the following would be correct: Noctis Avem Avem Noctis Avis Noctem Avem nox etc. What rules come ...
8
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2answers
784 views

Perfect passive forms like "amatus fuit"

The normal way of forming the perfect passive system is: perfect passive participle + a form from the present system of sum, e.g. amatus est, amatus erat, amatus sit, amatus esset. But one ...
6
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2answers
204 views

Is `duco sanitas` a grammatically correct way of saying `I lead health`?

Is "duco sanitas" a grammatically correct way of saying "I lead health"? For context, I'm looking for a short but grammatically correct way of saying I lead the development of healthy minds and ...
14
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3answers
1k views

Is "esse est percipi" grammatical, even with infinitives?

According to the Crash Course Philosophy video today, George Berkeley summarized his empirical philosophy with the phrase "esse est percipi", to be is to be perceived. However, it feels somewhat ...
9
votes
2answers
430 views

The difference between coniunctivus and imperativus when expressing commands

What is the rule for choosing coniunctivus or imperativus when expressing commands? I know, that imperativus has only second person forms, so one is forced to use coniunctivus for other persons. Are ...
15
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4answers
1k views

Is the Phrase "Sola Dea Fatum Novit" Proper Latin?

I have seen this sentence translated as both "Only the Goddess knows fate" and "Only the Goddess knows their fate". That aside, I remember someone telling me that this was not correct Latin, and it ...
13
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2answers
341 views

"Dies unus"—non primus?

Genese 1:5 Hieronymus traduxit: Appellavitque lucem Diem, et tenebras Noctem: factumque est vespere et mane, dies unus. Cur "unus", non "primus"? Nonne numerum ordinalem significat? Nonne "unus" ...
10
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1answer
187 views

"Ignis solis propinqui"

Linguā Latīnā Per Sē Illūstrātā Ioānnis Ørbergī pāginā 207 scrīptum est: Ignis sōlis propinquī cēram, quā pennae iūnctae et fīxae erant, mollīvit et pennās ussit. Cur nōn "propinquus" dīcit?

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