Questions tagged [grammar-choice]

When asking which choice (case, tense, mood etc.) is grammatical in a given situation, use this tag.

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10
votes
1answer
122 views

How do you say "imply" in Latin?

I need to know how to say the present, past and future tense of "imply" in Latin. I don't know much Latin, I just need the grammatically correct way to say: "Implied ______" For example, for "Implied ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

Is "Vinicultores Illustrissimi Hungari" grammatically correct?

I found the following inscription on the cover of a "Codex vinorum": "Vinicultores Illustrissimi Hungari" (as I would translate: the most excellent Hungarian viticulturists). I would like to give this ...
4
votes
1answer
483 views

Credere with Dative or Accusative

I came across this sentence in a fictional dialog in my Latin lesson. difficile est mihi hoc credere. In this context, hoc refers to someone else's claim of accomplishment. I had learned earlier ...
11
votes
1answer
3k views

When to use cum + subjunctive and when cum + indicative

So I have never, ever, ever been able to grasp fully any explanation in any textbook of when to use "cum" with the subjunctive and when to use it with the indicative, because the examples they give ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

Oratio obliqua and case agreement between accusative subject and subject in subordinate subjunctive

Given an accusative subject of oratio obliqua, if that subject is or words declined with it it are repeated in a subordinate subjunctive, are they accusative or nominative in the subjunctive? Exemplī ...
3
votes
1answer
162 views

Is the phrase 'Nec mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli' incorrect?

What is the difference between Ne mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli and Nec mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli and is the latter version, which differs in the single letter 'c' only, ...
3
votes
1answer
61 views

Would these two sentences be grammatically correct?

I used a dictionary and read up on declensions but since I have zero knowledge on the language, I have no idea if I translated them correctly (most likely not). I was hoping someone could provide ...
4
votes
1answer
187 views

Ordinal adjectives for single things modifying plural noun?

To refer to "the first and second chapters", do I say: capitula prima et secunda or: capitula primum et secundum?
6
votes
2answers
102 views

A range of chapters

How do you grammatically denote a range of chapters, like what I'm trying to do in this sentence? Ecce in hac pagina vox Iohannis Ørbergii capitula prima usque decima Linguae Latinae Per Se ...
4
votes
1answer
203 views

Nested genitive?

I just said this to a friend: Ecce in hac pagina vox Iohannis Ørbergii capitula a primo usque ad decimum Linguae Latinae Per Se Illustratae legentis: https://sites.google.com/site/...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Did the Romans distinguish derivation and loan?

I learned from this question that the Romans used the same verb mutuari both for loaning words from Greek and deriving new words within Latin. Are there any examples in classical literature that make ...
4
votes
1answer
47 views

Ear To The Ground

I'm trying to correctly write "Ear to the ground" in latin for a logo I'm creating. "Aurem ad Terram"? "Aurem in Terra"? Are either of these correct? Something else? Please help. Thanks!
3
votes
1answer
198 views

Numeral form for one pluralia tantum noun

One pants? One scissors? Oh, no way! This is a follow-up to the @brianpck's question How do I specify how many “litterae” or “castra” there are?, and the accepted answer was to use distributive ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Caesus et Clausus

"Caesus et Clausus" Is that grammatically correct? It's meant as a short motto whose meaning (in this case) I think would be "Struck/beaten and Shut off/Enclosed/Sealed", for a male character who has ...
2
votes
1answer
264 views

tense fluctuation in Latin narrative

Are there any guidelines for the fluctuation between past and historical present tense in Latin narrative other than "it's used for vividness"? I'm writing my first multi-scene narrative and so I'm ...
4
votes
1answer
80 views

Feedback on grammar in a Latin poem

I am writing a poem in Latin and am a bit torn as to the grammar. In English, the poem would be as below: In secrets there is power. In truths there is freedom. Lust is for now. Love is ...
6
votes
2answers
279 views

subjunctive after "Hoc est, quod"

I'm reading Ficīnus's Latin translation of Plato's Apology and came across the following passage, two things in which baffle me. (They're unrelated, so I'm making them two separate questions.) ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

How do you show something from a window?

Suppose, for example, that a child is watching his dad come home from work. She can't wait any longer to show what she's got, so she goes to the window and shows her new teddy bear to her dad. How can ...
7
votes
2answers
800 views

Walking "hand in hand"

How can I translate the sentence "We are walking hand in hand" in Latin? I am not sure how to render "hand in hand". A direct translation would be Ambulamus manus in manu. But can I use a nominative ...
3
votes
1answer
154 views

"ita" used for "adeō"

I'm reading Goffaux's 1823 Latin adaptation of Robinson Crusoe (it turns out there are FOUR nineteenth-century Latin adaptations of Robinson Crusoe!) and came across the sentence: Attamen propius ...
3
votes
1answer
255 views

Declension case in "Quo vadis?" sentence

Normally we use accusative to express the destination of the movement in Latin. Why then is the ablative form of interrogative pronoun (ie. "quo") used in the "Quo vadis?" sentence? When we answer ...
5
votes
1answer
396 views

Accusative--Infinitive Construction

Lucretius, De Natura Rerum: Liber Secundus; L177–181 contains this sentence: nam quamvis rerum ignorem primordia quae sint, hoc tamen ex ipsis caeli rationibus ausim confirmare aliisque ...
4
votes
1answer
107 views

Passive periphrastic with two datives

I want to translate the following as a passive periphrastic: You must give your money to me! My attempt so far is: pecunia tua tibi danda est mihi Because Latin rarely acknowledges word order, ...
6
votes
2answers
238 views

Using pro and ab in place of ante and post?

I wanted to change windows to use the unabbreviated ante meridiem and post meridiem for A.M. and P.M., but they're one letter too long. Google Translate lists pro and ab as alternate translations for "...
6
votes
1answer
121 views

Singulae aut unae scopae?

Tuomo Pekkanen's grammar (§92.1) explains how to express the number of something that is expressed by a plural-only word. Numbers greater than one are expressed with bini, trini etc. but a single one ...
6
votes
1answer
169 views

If you had to make an exclusively masculine noun refer to something feminine, would you just change the ending?

Sagittarius ("archer"), as a noun, is exclusively masculine, but I am trying to refer to a female archer in Latin. Would simply changing the ending to sagittaria suffice?
9
votes
3answers
4k views

Why *In medias res* and not *In media res*?

Wikipedia gives literal translation as: Into the middle of things. As far as I am aware into – in takes accusative. Plural accusative of medium seems to be media, not medias Even if I am ...
7
votes
0answers
98 views

Imperative vs Hortatory Subjunctive [duplicate]

According to this, Subjunctive can be used to express "an exhortation or a command". When should Hortatory Subjunctive be used and when Imperative is favoured? What is the difference in meaning?
5
votes
0answers
77 views

Does Latin offer a single word referring back to the preceding *two* names mentioned?

Background. The following is correct standard English: (0) He read the poems of Catullus, Juvenal, Horace, and Virgil. He intentionally memorized only poems of the latter two. The following uses ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Puella Mea OR Mea Puella?

E. E. Cummings wrote a poem called 'Puella Mea'. A quick skim of the omniscient google suggests that 'Mea Puella' might be more accurate. Which would be more accurate, in isolation, when used as a pet ...
4
votes
0answers
137 views

Is active periphrastic conjugation compulsory in consecutio temporum?

There is a rule which I have learned to know and love by the name consecutio temporum, and it governs the tense of a conjunctive predicate in (many) subordinate clauses. All three Latin Grammars I ...
5
votes
1answer
676 views

The use of subjunctive in the future

I came across the usage of subjunctive the other day. I read that if the main verb is in the present, future or perfect with have, the subjunctive is in the present whereas if the main verb is in the ...
8
votes
3answers
362 views

Can one recreate the ambiguity of the (incorrect) sentence "You can learn writing." in Latin?

It seems (to me at least) that with regard to the English sentence You can learn writing. the following is true: Strictly speaking, the sentence is grammatically incorrect w.r.t. standard modern ...
5
votes
3answers
445 views

Can aliquis function as an adjective?

Aliquis is typically a pronoun, but can it also function as an adjective like aliqui? For example, aliqui homo currit versus aliquis homo currit.
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the sentence "omnis res est" ("every thing is") grammatical?

Is the sentence omnis res est ("every thing is") grammatical? Likewise, are sentences like aliqua res est and nulla res est grammatical?
12
votes
2answers
494 views

Does Latin have a mechanism to disambiguate possessive pronouns of the same gender referring to distinct persons?

Question: does Latin have a grammatical mechanism to disambiguate the ambiguous use of `his' in the third of the three following English sentences? Person A wrote a book. Then person B wrote a ...
9
votes
2answers
380 views

Translating "destroy the bad" for a tattoo

I am considering a tattoo in Latin, and I want it to say "destroy the bad", or perhaps "get rid of the evil". I want the translation to be short due to space constraints. I looked online and I found ...
6
votes
2answers
128 views

Praeparatio in + ablative or accusative?

I would like to know which case follows after the phrase "praeparatio in" in the sense of "preparation in (expectation of)" in English, for example. To use the above-mentioned example, would the ...
6
votes
3answers
141 views

On the dative of reference

If I want to say in Latin I speak Latin easily, I say: In Latīnā facile loquere possum. But if I want to add to this the idea that it is in my opinion that I speak Latin easily, do I simply use ...
8
votes
3answers
4k views

Alea iacta est, plural version?

I was thinking about the famous Phrase "alea iacta est", and I was wondering: how would be the plural version of it? I thought about ALEAS IACTA SUNT Because aleas needs to be in the accusative ...
10
votes
1answer
1k views

Translation of "since 1950" (for example)

I'm in the midst of designing a graphic for my parents' 50th anniversary celebration, and for obscure reasons I want to include the proper Latin equivalent of "since 1967", in the same way that a ...
12
votes
1answer
621 views

What is the difference between accusative and genitive with meminisse?

The verb meminisse can take an accusative or a genitive object. Also other constructions are possible (see the entry in L&S), but I want to focus on comparing these two in classical Latin. Are ...
3
votes
2answers
268 views

When should the perfect tenses be used?

No matter the language, it seems as if the perfect tenses (except for the future perfect) can be replaced with the imperfect. In translation, why do these sets of tenses have different meaning? I don'...
6
votes
1answer
323 views

Meaning of Spiritus Lenis

I'm studying Arabic grammar from an old text book and it uses the term Spiritus Lenis. What does it mean? To quote the book: The object of it is merely to distinguish elif as the long vowel (ie ...
5
votes
0answers
237 views

Can Roman numerals stand for any kind of Latin numbers?

Latin has four classes of number words. Can Roman numerals (I, II, …) be used to for any class, or should they be restricted to, say, cardinals and ordinals? For example, can I abbreviate any ...
1
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0answers
73 views

What does "de" mean in "Ego de to my liking"?

In the classic school interchange Quis? Ego de to my liking. What grammatical part is the "de" playing?
8
votes
1answer
420 views

What if...? (Interrogative conditionals)

In English, "what if...?" is a succinct way to ask what would happen if some counterfactual happened to be true. Is there an idiomatic equivalent in Latin? The sequence of tenses gives plenty of ...
4
votes
0answers
57 views

Misquoting Linnaeus or correcting him?

I found a couple books that quote the introduction to the Systema Naturæ thus: Tanto igitur magis nosse naturam operæ pretium, quo nullum majus est! Linnaeus actually wrote: Tanto igitur magis ...
6
votes
2answers
312 views

Is "ire" used correctly here? "Iosaphatum salutem ite."

Can ire be used in this way? "Iosaphatum salutem ite." (I go to Iosephat for shelter.) Furthermore, is the two accusatives correct? This sentence is based on a Sanskrit construction, and I do not know ...
7
votes
1answer
107 views

Constantis vs. constantes et similia

Following up on @brianpck's suggestion in this question: In this passage: Maxume vero sunt admirabiles motus earum quinque stellarum quae falso vocantur errantes; nihil enim errat quod in omni ...