Questions tagged [grammar-choice]

When asking which choice (case, tense, mood etc.) is grammatical in a given situation, use this tag.

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1
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1answer
53 views

Carpe sciurum (sieze/harvest the squirrel?)

Would 'carpe sciurum' be a functional translation of 'seize the squirrel'? (As in to 'harvest' or 'pluck' the squirrel?)
2
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1answer
57 views

Preposition of agent

Is it better to say a lectica portatur or in lectica portatur if it's the lectīcā who is the agent? Gratias plurimas.
3
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1answer
121 views

Comparisons in Latin- does this make sense?

Here is my sentence: I'm trying to say that "The gods seemed to favor Romulus because he saw 12 vultures, twice the number of birds that Remus saw." Dii Romulō favere visi sunt quia ille ...
3
votes
3answers
221 views

What case does 'plus' take?

I don't have any information about what case to use with 'plus' (or 'magis'). In dictionaries usually only prepositions take some case, and it is showed in parentheses. In my language, 'more' takes ...
3
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0answers
32 views

Ascend "by", should it be ablative?

In music, a "comma" is a rough unit of intonation. If I were to refer to a refrain which had globally ascended a comma compared to the previous time it occurred, does it make sense that it ...
1
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1answer
151 views

Does this sentence in Latin make sense?

I'm having some trouble with indirect speech and was wondering if my answers to these questions are correctly worded. Quid Priamus ante Pyrrhō praedīxit quam periit? Priamus praedixit deos ...
3
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1answer
155 views

Are there any general rules for creating 'proper' Latin neologisms, beyond matching gender, number, and case?

For the sake of this question, I'm going to be using this definition of neologism, "A newly coined word or phrase." From my understanding, the loose etymology of this word is the French neo plus Greek ...
8
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1answer
398 views

Can "sum" and "nemo" work together to create a phrase meaning "I am no one?"

I have been trying to understand the relationship between "sum" and "nemo", to create a phrase meaning something like "I am no one". In all the contexts I personally ...
4
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2answers
405 views

Furtum est, secundum lege lata, contrectatio rei alienae fraudulenta

How to say this in proper, idiomatic, classical Latin? Theft is, according to existing law, laying hands on others' (foreign, strange, belonging to others) things fraudulently. Would one use the ...
6
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3answers
650 views

Sentence which includes an example of each case

I'm looking for a sentence which includes the usage of each case of Latin. For example, a student could mark each word in the sentence to indicate its case and function for ease of learning. Extreme ...
4
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1answer
110 views

As X came, Y deftly stepped aside

I was wondering, in a sentence where you have the following structure: As he came, Julius deftly stepped aside Would you express this with dum, or with a participle, or with cum/postquam, while ...
2
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1answer
122 views

A Completed Action in the Mind OR Indirect Speech?

There are currently two theories (of which I am aware) to explain the use of the perfect subjunctive, in examples from the Latin Vulgate, included in brianpck's answer to Q: Memento quod <...
7
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1answer
343 views

Semantic difference of ablative and accusative cases when following "in"

What is the semantic and conceptual difference of ablative and accusative cases when following in? Examples: In dubio pro reo & opinio iuris uniformis et in longo usu Dubio and longo are in ...
4
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2answers
184 views

A Royal Title for a Fictional King

So, I'm trying to make a royal title in Latin for a fictional king. I tried to model it heavily after Queen Elizabeth II's royal title to keep myself as accurate as possible and I came up with: ...
3
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1answer
161 views

Why the Perfect Subjunctive?

In this question, R.B. Jawad asked for a translation of two sentences. The second of these: "canuntur quando reversi fuerint et appropinquant regias ecclesie (sic)." was translated by brianpck: ...
6
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1answer
89 views

Hoc as a word to sum up a previous paragraph

I have seen hoc not agreeing with grammatical gender when it refers to a previous paragraph of actions. But I don't remember in what context. Here is a made up example in English: I once went to ...
4
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3answers
385 views

Best Latin translation of an English Phrase "Always Present, Never Seen"

I am designing some potential products for my organization, and I want to include a version that includes a tag line written in Latin of one of the our organizational values. The phrase I'm looking ...
10
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2answers
336 views

Is it "bene videtur" or "bonum videtur"? Adjective or adverb with verbs/copulae meaning "seem"

With verbs like "seem, appear", one sometimes uses an adverb to express how something appears ("she looked well"), at other times an adjective ("he seemed angry"). How did the Romans do it, ...
4
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1answer
145 views

"Aliquid scribere" or "de aliquo scribere"

Scaliger once wrote Manilius nesciebat quid scribebat, by which he obviously meant that Manilius did not know what he was writing about. In English, there is a big difference between "writing ...
5
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0answers
105 views

Infinitive clause constructed via plural noun

I stumbled upon this sentence and I am quite perplexed. I would translate as the first example I'll show, but I'd like to be sure. "Cum ista ex militum cognitione toti Galli intelligant esse ...
9
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2answers
466 views

Manilius nesciebat quid scribebat

When the formidable classicist A. E. Housman published his critical edition of Manilius' Astronomicon, he stated in his infamous preface, "When Scaliger says at v 39 Manilius nesciebat quid scribebat ...
7
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1answer
149 views

Difference between "Ubi est subject" and "Subject ubi est"?

In LLPSI, there is this line: Ubi est Nilus? Nilus in Africa est. Rhenus ubi est? Rhenus est in Germania. In both questions, the wording changed around, as did in the answers. Does this wording ...
2
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2answers
133 views

Expressing time duration or time when and within

I'm studying Oxford Latin Course. The book said that duration of time takes the accusative and time when and within take the ablative case. I can understand that, but does duration of time and time ...
2
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1answer
82 views

Salsissimum futura erit - is this right?

I need this translation for an artwork "future will be salty" Salsissimum erit futura Salsissimum futura erit it's a joke for an illustration of Diocletian announcing the salt as payment.
2
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0answers
40 views

Titling texts in Latin

So, I'm puzzling through a grammar structure in Latin, mostly after just cramming a bunch of grammar into my head. I'm trying to concoct the title of an imaginary text. I'd like to check whether I'...
3
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2answers
142 views

What is the closest latin wording for "Work to solve"? Opus solvere?

Contextually, it is the idea that work/effort should always be done with the goal of finding the solution to a problem or hurdle. Google suggests "Opus solvere" and the component words seem to make ...
4
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1answer
441 views

How to say 'I am myself'?

I'm still figuring out the difference between the various ways to say 'I', 'me', and 'myself' in Latin. My best guess for this phrase is 'Ego sum memet', but I'm not sure which case the second word ...
5
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1answer
201 views

How to say: "X differs from Y by(in) Z"

I want to say something of this sort: The word "res" differs from the word "rex" by one letter. In "Lexicon totius Latinitatis" I saw under the term "dama": "[Dama] differt a capreis solis ...
3
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1answer
259 views

The usage of present passive infinitive

In Augustine confessions we read: "quid tibi sum ipse, ut amari te iubeas a me et, nisi faciam, irascaris mihi et mineris ingentes miserias?" (book I, cap. V) I can't understand the usage of the ...
4
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1answer
134 views

How does one express adjectives in the present tense in Latin which aren't everlasting?

Exempli gratia, how would one say 'I am perturbed' in Latin opposed to 'I am human'? The state of being perturbed can change, but the state of being a human being cannot change, so how does one write ...
4
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1answer
96 views

Should one use the singular or plural when the number is unknown?

It just occurred to me (I'm that guy maybe starting the YouTube channel) that I don't know whether to use the singular or plural to address my audience in Latin. My thinking goes like this: plural ...
9
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3answers
1k views

Dropping "to be" and other verbs in Latin?

Some languages, like Indonesian, can drop the verb to be when the meaning is obvious. They are zero-copula languages. I heard that some Latin authors wrote some sentences with this feature. Do you ...
6
votes
1answer
266 views

"Habere" VS dative and genitive of possession?

To mean something that is not owned legally, not owned with the meaning of "being the owner", like when I say "We have a pope", could I use "habere" or only the dative or genitive of possession? Is ...
0
votes
1answer
94 views

Asking a teacher for more (hopefully extra credit) homework

Salvete, Sodales! I'm a student in his second year of Latin study, but my class has been slow in reading our texts and I've been bored from the beginning. I want to ask my teacher to give me more ...
4
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1answer
693 views

When does est go at the end of a sentence?

How do i know when to put the latin word 'est' at the end of a sentence? For example: Scintilla fessa est, Scintilla est femina Why is 'est' in a different position in each of the above sentences.
4
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1answer
85 views

Is "semper in animi" be a reasonable translation of always in our minds

Would "semper in animi" be a reasonable translation of always in our minds as in always remembered in a fond, personal sense when thinking about your parents?
2
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2answers
157 views

Essentialia negotii transaction's essentials

So essentialia negotii is transaction's essentials. How would one say The transaction's essential things, transactions' essential things, essential things of the transaction and essential things of ...
2
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2answers
3k views

Is the adjective in latin put after the noun or before?

E.g Is the legal term essentialia negotii correct use of the grammar(declension, agreement, word order) rules or not? Should it not be negotiorum essentialium so that the case, the number and the ...
5
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1answer
169 views

When a Greek word is borrowed by Latin, does it keep the same gender?

When a Greek word is borrowed by Latin, does it keep the same gender that it had in Greek? For example, a question arose about the word platysma, a muscle in the neck. It undoubtedly comes from ...
5
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1answer
83 views

How do I name the individual parts of the lumbricals muscle of the foot in latin?

As we can see, Wikipedia lists the lumbricals muscle and tells us that the muscle contains four parts. I need to name all four individual parts of the muscle and their respective side in the body. I ...
8
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2answers
685 views

Where is the correct position to set right or left of muscle names for anatomical names?

Muscles and bones have Latin names as can be found on wikipedia. I need to name muscles and bones with their Latin name and I also need to specify if it's the left or the right muscle in the human ...
3
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1answer
551 views

The grammar of the expression "mihi cordi est"

Recently I encountered the phrase "mihi cordi est", after googling it I saw it is quite common phrase that seem to mean "it pleases me". For example: "vita horrida, arida, atque dura, mihi cordi est". ...
2
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2answers
170 views

Second vs. third person in future imperative for a general rule or maxim

I am trying to translate "plan [in order] to achieve" into Latin. Is it more appropriate to use second ("meditator ut consequaris") or third person ("meditator ut consequatur") in future imperative ...
4
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0answers
74 views

Alternative forms in second-person singular present active subjunctive [duplicate]

I am trying to translate "plan [in order] to achieve" into Latin. From the dictionary it looks like both "meditator ut consequaris" and "meditator ut consequare" are grammatically correct. Are they, ...
3
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1answer
219 views

What is the grammatical "logic" of impersonal constructions like "Me non solum piget stultitiae meae sed etiam pudet" (Cic. De Dom. 29)?

What is the grammatical "logic" of the impersonal construction with psychological verbs like pudet, piget, paenitet, taedet, miseret? (here is a short descriptive characterization of so-...
4
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2answers
3k views

"Never/do not forget, always remember" in Latin

I've looked around some forums and the translation I've got so far is: Ne Obliviscaris, Semper Commemoras I'm still not sure if this is correct. The context of the phrase that I wish to get the ...
5
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1answer
317 views

The instances where verbs might take the genitive case

In Sixto-Clementine Vulgate we find in Genesis this verse: poenituit eum quod hominum fecisset in terra (Genesis 6:6) "hominum" is in the genetive case which I find strange. I try searching for ...
5
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2answers
625 views

Is EUM the only possible translation for HIM as direct object?

In an exam a teacher has put the following example to fill in the gap: Amici Rufi ____ noscebant. According to the docent, if the right word has been selected, the translation in English should be:...
3
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1answer
217 views

Grammar of "Nec huic publico, ut opinantur, malo turba tantum et imprudens uulgus ingemuit"

I'm a novice trying to learn Latin, and I hope this question is appropriate to this forum (please let me know if it is not the case). I tried to read this section from De Brevitate Vitae (text here):...
3
votes
3answers
363 views

Mihi legendum/legenda est?

I've another question about Coniugatio periphrastica passiva. If I'm a girl and I wanted to say I need to read, would it be: Mihi legendum est. Or Mihi legenda est. So, does the gerundivum ...