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Questions tagged [grammar-choice]

When asking which choice (case, tense, mood etc.) is grammatical in a given situation, use this tag.

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131 views

How to speak a language with a third declension adjective?

Most Latin adjectives related to names of countries and languages are of first and second declension: Latinus, Graecus, Anglicus… If I want to express that I speak in any such language, I will ...
7
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64 views

Gender and number in medieval composite active perfect

I am not sure of correct terminology, but let me call the medieval perfect tenses like amatum habeo — as opposed to the classical amavi — the "composite active perfect". One would expect ...
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48 views

What is the difference between conjunctive present and perfect with ne?

I have seen both present and perfect forms of the conjunctive for negative orders or requests, for example ne canas and ne cecineris. What is the difference? Is one more an order and the other more a ...
6
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58 views

If you had to make an exclusively masculine noun refer to something feminine, would you just change the ending?

Sagittarius ("archer"), as a noun, is exclusively masculine, but I am trying to refer to a female archer in Latin. Would simply changing the ending to sagittaria suffice?
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43 views

Can I use an instrument with the supine ablative of respect?

If a book is easy to write, I might say liber facilis est scriptu. Here the supine ablative scriptu is an ablative of respect (ablativus respectus). If I want to be more specific about my writing, I ...
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66 views

Does Latin offer a single word referring back to the preceding *two* names mentioned?

Background. The following is correct standard English: (0) He read the poems of Catullus, Juvenal, Horace, and Virgil. He intentionally memorized only poems of the latter two. The following uses ...
5
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0answers
137 views

Can Roman numerals stand for any kind of Latin numbers?

Latin has four classes of number words. Can Roman numerals (I, II, …) be used to for any class, or should they be restricted to, say, cardinals and ordinals? For example, can I abbreviate any ...
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34 views

Quippe+quod (Early Modern period)

Looking at other posts on quippe+relatives (particularly, at this link:1), there seems to be a consensus that it will usually show up with qui/... but not with quod, but I'm currently looking at a ...
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129 views

Mr Bean's Latin lyrics

I just saw an episode of Mr Bean and once again heard the choir sing in Latin. Based on what I remember hearing and what I found online, the four segments sung are: Start: Ecce homo qui est faba &...
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45 views

Misquoting Linnaeus or correcting him?

I found a couple books that quote the introduction to the Systema Naturæ thus: Tanto igitur magis nosse naturam operæ pretium, quo nullum majus est! Linnaeus actually wrote: Tanto igitur magis ...
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117 views

Are causal relative clauses stylistically preferred to causal clauses?

In Latin a relative clause can be causal and the causal nature can be emphasized with quippe, ut, utpote or praesertim. A causal relative clause can always be replaced with a causal clause, but not ...
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40 views

Conjugation/grammar for fictitious title

In a work of fiction, I have an Order of ordained detectives that do not exist. I use the term Lictor Rebus Sanctorae for the Order, and Lictor Rebus Sanctorus for the male protagonist. I know this ...
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197 views

Latin gender and non-binary gender identity

I am preparing for a large academic event where Latin is used. Latin will be used in the spoken ceremonies and, more importantly for this question, in written diplomas. The gender of the recipient of ...
3
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0answers
45 views

Is the following sentence grammatically correct?

I'm in university and in creative writing they asked us to write a short story. I chose a mystery story and composed this sentence for it: Omni usurpant optimes sapientes virtutes acceptum verum ...
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76 views

Is active periphrastic conjugation compulsory in consecutio temporum?

There is a rule which I have learned to know and love by the name consecutio temporum, and it governs the tense of a conjunctive predicate in (many) subordinate clauses. All three Latin Grammars I ...
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33 views

How do I translate “On the Nature of Renewal” into Latin?

I'm trying to create a title in latin: On the Nature of Renewal where Renewal could be exchanged with Rebirth or Regeneration, and Nature is maybe better as Subject. With this structure, I figured ...
2
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0answers
73 views

When should the perfect tenses be used?

No matter the language, it seems as if the perfect tenses (except for the future perfect) can be replaced with the imperfect. In translation, why do these sets of tenses have different meaning? I don'...
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69 views

Is “que” or “et” better for a “God and Family” tattoo?

Hi I’m planning to have a tattoo and I would like to have a translation in Latin of “God and Family”. Which one is appropriate, "deo et familia" or "deo familiaque"?
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31 views

Did the Romans distinguish derivation and loan?

I learned from this question that the Romans used the same verb mutuari both for loaning words from Greek and deriving new words within Latin. Are there any examples in classical literature that make ...
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0answers
61 views

What does “de” mean in “Ego de to my liking”?

In the classic school interchange Quis? Ego de to my liking. What grammatical part is the "de" playing?