Questions tagged [grammar-choice]

When asking which choice (case, tense, mood etc.) is grammatical in a given situation, use this tag.

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7
votes
1answer
76 views

What is the difference between conjunctive present and perfect with ne?

I have seen both present and perfect forms of the conjunctive for negative orders or requests, for example ne canas and ne cecineris. What is the difference? Is one more an order and the other more a ...
8
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1answer
103 views

Gender and number in medieval composite active perfect

I am not sure of correct terminology, but let me call the medieval perfect tenses like amatum habeo — as opposed to the classical amavi — the "composite active perfect". One would expect ...
4
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1answer
316 views

“Never/do not forget, always remember” in Latin

I've looked around some forums and the translation I've got so far is: Ne Obliviscaris, Semper Commemoras I'm still not sure if this is correct. The context of the phrase that I wish to get the ...
4
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1answer
113 views

The instances where verbs might take the genitive case

In Sixto-Clementine Vulgate we find in Genesis this verse: poenituit eum quod hominum fecisset in terra (Genesis 6:6) "hominum" is in the genetive case which I find strange. I try searching for ...
3
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2answers
150 views

When should the perfect tenses be used?

No matter the language, it seems as if the perfect tenses (except for the future perfect) can be replaced with the imperfect. In translation, why do these sets of tenses have different meaning? I don'...
4
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2answers
292 views

Latin gender and non-binary gender identity

I am preparing for a large academic event where Latin is used. Latin will be used in the spoken ceremonies and, more importantly for this question, in written diplomas. The gender of the recipient of ...
5
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2answers
243 views

Is EUM the only possible translation for HIM as direct object?

In an exam a teacher has put the following example to fill in the gap: Amici Rufi ____ noscebant. According to the docent, if the right word has been selected, the translation in English should be:...
3
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1answer
147 views

Grammar of “Nec huic publico, ut opinantur, malo turba tantum et imprudens uulgus ingemuit”

I'm a novice trying to learn Latin, and I hope this question is appropriate to this forum (please let me know if it is not the case). I tried to read this section from De Brevitate Vitae (text here):...
2
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3answers
147 views

Mihi legendum/legenda est?

I've another question about Coniugatio periphrastica passiva. If I'm a girl and I wanted to say I need to read, would it be: Mihi legendum est. Or Mihi legenda est. So, does the gerundivum ...
2
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0answers
102 views

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? [closed]

I'm in university and in creative writing they asked us to write a short story. I chose a mystery story and composed this sentence for it: Omni usurpant optimes sapientes virtutes acceptum verum ...
5
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4answers
228 views

Why use nominative in Coniugatio periphrastica passiva?

Why do we use the nominative case in this example: Liber legendus est. = The book needs to be read. If liber is a direct object, then why not put it in accusative?
3
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1answer
61 views

Conjugation/grammar for fictitious title

In a work of fiction, I have an Order of ordained detectives that do not exist. I use the term Lictor Rebus Sanctorae for the Order, and Lictor Rebus Sanctorus for the male protagonist. I know this ...
6
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1answer
83 views

If you had to make an exclusively masculine noun refer to something feminine, would you just change the ending?

Sagittarius ("archer"), as a noun, is exclusively masculine, but I am trying to refer to a female archer in Latin. Would simply changing the ending to sagittaria suffice?
11
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2answers
360 views

How to speak a language with a third declension adjective?

Most Latin adjectives related to names of countries and languages are of first and second declension: Latinus, Graecus, Anglicus… If I want to express that I speak in any such language, I will ...
5
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1answer
41 views

Herodot 2.124 (“τὴν ἔδειμαν ἔργον ἐὸν”)

I have two questions about the following sentences (Herodot, Histories, 2.124.3) : The workers working for the pyramid of Cheops... ἐργάζοντο δὲ κατὰ δέκα μυριάδας ἀνθρώπων αἰεὶ τὴν τρίμηνον ...
1
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1answer
98 views

Is “que” or “et” better for a “God and Family” tattoo?

Hi I’m planning to have a tattoo and I would like to have a translation in Latin of “God and Family”. Which one is appropriate, "deo et familia" or "deo familiaque"?
4
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1answer
148 views

Pronunciation of numbers with respect to years

I understand that when dates are written, the years are expressed in Roman numerals (e.g.: 2019 is written MMXIX), but it has been years since I heard the numbers actually pronounced. How were the ...
2
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1answer
53 views

How do I translate “On the Nature of Renewal” into Latin?

I'm trying to create a title in latin: On the Nature of Renewal where Renewal could be exchanged with Rebirth or Regeneration, and Nature is maybe better as Subject. With this structure, I figured ...
4
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3answers
688 views

How do I say “this must not happen”?

I'm used to translating English auxiliary "must" with a Latin gerundive: hic necandus est "this man must be killed". But what if I want to say "this man must not be killed"? I would read non necandus ...
7
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1answer
93 views

Constantis vs. constantes et similia

Following up on @brianpck's suggestion in this question: In this passage: Maxume vero sunt admirabiles motus earum quinque stellarum quae falso vocantur errantes; nihil enim errat quod in omni ...
5
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2answers
82 views

A range of chapters

How do you grammatically denote a range of chapters, like what I'm trying to do in this sentence? Ecce in hac pagina vox Iohannis Ørbergii capitula prima usque decima Linguae Latinae Per Se ...
3
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1answer
147 views

Ordinal adjectives for single things modifying plural noun?

To refer to "the first and second chapters", do I say: capitula prima et secunda or: capitula primum et secundum?
3
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1answer
44 views

Translating sentence but how do I deal with conjugation - if it's plural in English, is it plural in Latin?

I want to translate "Fear is a crossroads" but I'm confused because in English, "crossroads" is plural, but uses the singular article "a". So would my sentence be "Timor est compitum" or "Timor sunt ...
11
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2answers
242 views

What cases were used in compounds?

In Greco-Latin compound words, I generally use the bare stems for all but the last component, joined together with stem vowels (in Greek) or i (in Latin). For example, certifaciō (> certify) comes ...
9
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2answers
628 views

Is it acceptable/regular to use diacritics (macron) in written texts?

I'm building the brand for a web development company, and I'm using Latin for the name and slogan. However, as I am not familiar with the language, I would like some help clarifying meanings to avoid ...
4
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2answers
161 views

On the (typical?) ambiguity of “Porta clausa est”

It is often said that Porta clausa est can have two readings depending on the categorial nature of the participle: verbal (cf. clauditur/clausa est) or adjectival (cf. clausa est/clausa fuit), which ...
8
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2answers
135 views

When was the dual number used in Attic Greek?

I have only studied the very basics of Greek years ago, so the question might be simple, but I couldn't find a clear summary anywhere. Attic Greek has a dual number alongside singular and plural. When ...
15
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2answers
4k views

Do *Mundi* and *Mundum* mean different things?

I came across this expression in the book: The Invisible Man, (H.G. Wells) Griffin contra mundum...with a vengeance From my very basic knowledge of Latin (I'm a Bio. student) I take it that contra ...
4
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1answer
160 views

Is there any acceptable translation for “Lux Astrum”?

While asking this question where I was asking about building a brand name and motto using Latin, I realized that my choice of name is incorrect. If you want to go with lux astrum or something ...
8
votes
1answer
107 views

“Hunt deer with bows, with snares: rabbits,” or referencing a verb from a previous clause

I've been trying to translate the following phrase into Latin: Hunt deer with bows, with snares: rabbits. With my limited grasp of Latin, I have come to this result: Vēnāre cervas arcubus, ...
7
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2answers
1k views

Could we say “dies mirabilis” as we say “annus mirabilis”?

"Annus mirabilis" is an expression which refers to a wonderful year like 1905 for A. Einstein and modern physics. What would be the equivalent for a single day? Is "dies mirabilis" the correct form? ...
15
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3answers
816 views

Is “esse est percipi” grammatical, even with infinitives?

According to the Crash Course Philosophy video today, George Berkeley summarized his empirical philosophy with the phrase "esse est percipi", to be is to be perceived. However, it feels somewhat ...
11
votes
1answer
270 views

What is the difference between accusative and genitive with meminisse?

The verb meminisse can take an accusative or a genitive object. Also other constructions are possible (see the entry in L&S), but I want to focus on comparing these two in classical Latin. Are ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Is the phrase professor emerita grammatically correct?

Since professor has masculine gender, one may think that the phrase should be professor emeritus, regardless of the gender of the person referred to. Is the use of emerita simply a case of grammatical ...
7
votes
1answer
63 views

Is my rephrasing of this purpose clause correct?

Suppose I have a sentence: "Hercules reliquit viam ut Megaram peteret." If I want to rephrase the purpose clause using the gerund / gerundive; would it be correct to write the following? "...
5
votes
1answer
64 views

How do I negate an ut clause of result?

Ut clauses of result are excellent for saying "so ___ that". But what if I wanted to reverse this and say "not ___ enough to"? For example, tam strenue laborābam ut epistolās centum scripserim means "...
5
votes
1answer
59 views

New to Latin—why is the Present Indicative sometimes at the end, and sometimes in the middle of a sentence?

I'm working my way through Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, and I've come across something that's tripping me up when I try to write. Example: Gallia est in Europa (pardon the lack of accents); and ...
4
votes
1answer
63 views

Case of the adjective in “made someone more something”

In A new latin composition by Charles E. Bennett one may find following statement to translate into latin (from Lesson IV): This circumstance made the troops more courageous. My attempt at ...
6
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1answer
203 views

Shouldn't “decursus” be accusative in Psalm 1:3?

(Psalm 1:3, Clementine Vulgate) Et erit tamquam lignum quod plantatum est secus decursus aquarum, quod fructum suum dabit in tempore suo: et folium ejus non defluet; et omnia quæcumque faciet ...
3
votes
2answers
133 views

How do I say “this is mine”?

Suppose I want to say "this house is mine" in Latin. The straightforward translation, dōmus haec est mea, sounds odd to me—perhaps just because English changes its possessive pronouns in predicate ...
7
votes
1answer
87 views

When did the infinitive of purpose arise?

In Classical Latin, purpose would normally be expressed with ut, or ad with a gerund, or a supine with a verb of motion, or numerous other ways. However, in later and vulgar Latin (most notably the ...
4
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2answers
478 views

How do I say “everything started here”?

I would like like to translate "everything started here" in Latin. Would omni coepia hinc work?
3
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1answer
53 views

How it's better to translate “The best house” into Latin?

Can I use "Domus optima" or "Domus optimus" as the equivalent (I do not need a literal translation) of "The best house"? Should "optima" be used with a noun "domus" or both are correct?
6
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2answers
81 views

Praeparatio in + ablative or accusative?

I would like to know which case follows after the phrase "praeparatio in" in the sense of "preparation in (expectation of)" in English, for example. To use the above-mentioned example, would the ...
11
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1answer
168 views

What is the logic behind the order of the cases

Most English books of Latin use the order used by Charles E. Bennett: Nominative, Genitive, Dative, Accusative, Vocative, Ablative. But most French books use the following order: Nominative, ...
6
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2answers
769 views

In: Ablative or accusative

In chapter 4 LLPSI it says "sacculum suum in mensa ponit". Ponit means put or sets, so indicates a movement. As far as I know in in Latin in the meaning of into or onto (as is the case here) takes the ...
4
votes
1answer
98 views

Is this a good way to say 'So remember me this way'?

sic este mei memores hec illac I am trying to use it in a poem. It needs to be 10 syllables and the end has to rhyme with 'attack.' Is this a good way to say 'So remember me this way'?
6
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2answers
141 views

Is `duco sanitas` a grammatically correct way of saying `I lead health`?

Is "duco sanitas" a grammatically correct way of saying "I lead health"? For context, I'm looking for a short but grammatically correct way of saying I lead the development of healthy minds and ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

How to write “Stand on the shoulders of giants” correctly? [duplicate]

I know that "nanos gigantium humeris insidentes" is "dwarves on the shoulders of giants". But what is the properly written way of saying either "on the shoulders of giants" and/or "standing on the ...
2
votes
1answer
65 views

“Implied Power”

I am looking for a way to say "Implied Power" in Latin. When I say "Implied Power" I mean to say "Implicit Political Authority." Here is an example to walk readers through what I am trying to get at: ...