Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [gerundivum]

For questions about gerundives (not to be confused with gerunds).

1
vote
2answers
47 views

Translation: that which was to have been made

I still remember quod erat demonstrandum, but ...that which was to have been made (actually generated)? How would I best say that? I am thinking quod erat factum, but am unsure.
2
votes
3answers
145 views

Mihi legendum/legenda est?

I've another question about Coniugatio periphrastica passiva. If I'm a girl and I wanted to say I need to read, would it be: Mihi legendum est. Or Mihi legenda est. So, does the gerundivum ...
6
votes
2answers
135 views

What is the difference in meaning/usage between “nasciturus” and “nascendus”?

Both nasciturus and nascendus seem to exist. Words ending in -turus are often described as future active participles, and words ending in -ndus as future passive participles (they are also called ...
6
votes
2answers
219 views

Can 'non' with gerundive mean both lack of obligation and negative obligation?

If a gerundive is used with non, can it mean both lack of obligation and negative obligation? For example, can non loquendum est mean both "it is not necessary to speak" and "it is necessary not to ...
4
votes
3answers
675 views

How do I say “this must not happen”?

I'm used to translating English auxiliary "must" with a Latin gerundive: hic necandus est "this man must be killed". But what if I want to say "this man must not be killed"? I would read non necandus ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Gerundive Confusion

North & Hillard Ex. 196: the following is to be translated into Latin: "He (Hannibal) had almost reached the top of the Alps, when some old men came to him in the guise of envoys. The misfortunes ...
3
votes
0answers
43 views

Verbal Adjective of Necessity vs. Possibility

Greek distinguishes between verbal adjectives ending in -τέος and verbal adjectives ending in -τός. The latter (according to Smyth) express either possibility or the perfect passive participle (e.g. '...
7
votes
1answer
224 views

Is there a gerundive of “faciō”?

Faciō, "to make" or "to do", is a common Latin verb. It's famous for being suppletive: it's missing most of its passive forms, and instead uses the active forms of the separate verb fiō "to become". (...
4
votes
0answers
37 views

Translation help, especially with “cum bello cupiendo”

I found the following translation exercise online: To say nothing of Philip, whom he rendered an enemy to the Romans, though at a distance from him, Antiochus was the most powerful of all kings ...
5
votes
1answer
208 views

Is 'praestandis' in this sentence a gerund (gerundium) or a gerundive (gerundivum)?

Optimis facinoribus variis in conspectu omnium praestandis rex apud populum famam pietatis ac sapientiae possedit. Is praestandis a gerund or gerundive or both? And does it matter for the translation?...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

Passive periphrastic with two datives

I want to translate the following as a passive periphrastic: You must give your money to me! My attempt so far is: pecunia tua tibi danda est mihi Because Latin rarely acknowledges word order, ...
9
votes
2answers
244 views

When is there a U instead of an E in gerund(ive)?

Tuomo Pekkanen's Latin grammar mentions (§52.3) that the -e- added to the present stem before -nd- in the gerund and gerundive (in the third and fourth conjugations) can be replaced with a -u-. For ...
3
votes
0answers
71 views

When and how did the distinction between the gerund and the gerundive develop?

The gerund and the gerundive look similar and have similar meanings, but they are still distinct as any Latin grammar will tell us. But how did classical Latin come to have these two close but ...
8
votes
1answer
94 views

Passives Without Accusatives

(Split off from my previous question about gerundives of deponent verbs.) For a transitive verb, it's fairly simple to convert a sentence from active to passive: X-nom VERB-active Y-acc = Y-nom ...
10
votes
1answer
427 views

How do I use gerundives of obligation for deponent verbs?

(Inspired by the comments on this answer.) The gerundive of obligation is a wonderful little idiom in Latin, as in Cato's famous mantra Carthāgō dēlenda est "Carthage must be destroyed" In this ...
9
votes
1answer
159 views

How to understand 'quae prosum sola nocendo'?

There is a line in Ovid's Metamorphoses II 519, which I don't understand at all (Juno's complaint) 'quaeritis, aetheriis quare regina deorum sedibus huc adsim? pro me tenet altera caelum! ...
4
votes
1answer
106 views

Can the gerundive be used like an adjective?

Can I use a gerundive like I would use an adjective as in the following example? It sounds fine to me, but I am somewhat suspicious; my intuition has failed before. Infans lavandus clamabat. The ...
4
votes
2answers
112 views

Is “lingua Latina studenda pergit” grammatical?

I want to say "people continue to study Latin", and I came up with lingua Latina studenda pergit. Is such a combination gerundive and pergere grammatical? It must be understandable, but I do not ...
6
votes
1answer
241 views

When can the gerund take an object?

Typically the gerundive is employed when one using a gerund with an object seems possible. For example, I have understood that aqua bibenda est and rei faciendae causa are preferable to aquam bibendum ...