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Questions tagged [gerundium]

For questions about gerunds (not to be confused with gerundives).

7
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1answer
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Is my rephrasing of this purpose clause correct?

Suppose I have a sentence: "Hercules reliquit viam ut Megaram peteret." If I want to rephrase the purpose clause using the gerund / gerundive; would it be correct to write the following? "...
6
votes
1answer
177 views

What forms are the verbs in “Omnibus rebus paratis, Caesar milites naves conscendere jussit”?

In "Omnibus rebus paratis, Caesar milites naves conscendere jussit", what forms are the verbs "paratis" and "jussit", and why? This sentence was taken from Gramática latina de Napoleão Mendes, from ...
8
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1answer
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Is the nominative gerund attested?

I'd always heard that the gerund had no nominative, with the present active infinitive taking the place of the missing form: volāre difficile est, rather than *volāndum. However, in the comments on ...
5
votes
1answer
74 views

Vocative Gerund

I am 99.9999% confident there is no purpose for a vocative gerund. Yet nothing seems to specifically disallow for such a construction. In theory something such as "odi te currendum" (in English, "I ...
4
votes
0answers
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Translation help, especially with “cum bello cupiendo”

I found the following translation exercise online: To say nothing of Philip, whom he rendered an enemy to the Romans, though at a distance from him, Antiochus was the most powerful of all kings ...
5
votes
1answer
198 views

Is 'praestandis' in this sentence a gerund (gerundium) or a gerundive (gerundivum)?

Optimis facinoribus variis in conspectu omnium praestandis rex apud populum famam pietatis ac sapientiae possedit. Is praestandis a gerund or gerundive or both? And does it matter for the translation?...
9
votes
2answers
194 views

When is there a U instead of an E in gerund(ive)?

Tuomo Pekkanen's Latin grammar mentions (§52.3) that the -e- added to the present stem before -nd- in the gerund and gerundive (in the third and fourth conjugations) can be replaced with a -u-. For ...
2
votes
0answers
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When and how did the distinction between the gerund and the gerundive develop?

The gerund and the gerundive look similar and have similar meanings, but they are still distinct as any Latin grammar will tell us. But how did classical Latin come to have these two close but ...
6
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1answer
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Am I grasping this gerund correctly? and also the talem…qualem pair?

This is actually a continuation of my last question. The following sentence is a little tricky, and I feel I may have missed a thing or two. I appreciate any feedback. "Etiam hac hora difficillima",...
7
votes
1answer
113 views

Short vowels in lucubrando

I came across a poem from 1621 written in Sapphic stanza. It contains this line: pervigil Christi, lucubrando sudans To scan that, the third word must be lŭcŭbrandŏ. L&S ...
8
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1answer
191 views

Use of the gerund in the Vulgate bible

I was reading Luke 10:25 in the Vulgate bible, trying my best to translate as literally as possible. But I found it hard to translate the question that the expert of law (legisperitus) poses. (...
5
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1answer
156 views

When do I use the gerundive vs. participle forms of a verb in Latin?

When do I use the gerundive vs. participle forms of a verb in Latin?
6
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1answer
166 views

When can the gerund take an object?

Typically the gerundive is employed when one using a gerund with an object seems possible. For example, I have understood that aqua bibenda est and rei faciendae causa are preferable to aquam bibendum ...
17
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5answers
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“Miserando atque eligendo”

There seem to be two schools of thought about the meaning of the motto on Pope Francis's coat of arms: miserando atque eligendo These words are taken from the 21st homily of the Venerable Bede, ...