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Questions tagged [genitive]

For questions about the genitive case.

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Why do we write “cum marito eius” (cum + abl+ gen.) and not “cum marito ei” (cum + abl+ abl.)?

Pline wrote this sentence: “Sunt mihi et cum marito eius Minicio Iusto, optimo viro, vetera iura; fuerunt et cum filio maxima, adeo quidem ut praetore 5 me ludis meis praesederit”. I don’t understand ...
Vincent Lille's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
223 views

Usage of ablative in a sentence by Curtius

This text comes from Quintus Curtius Rufus Historiae Alexandri Magni, book 3, chapter 5 (emphasis mine): Mediam Cydnus amnis, de quo paulo ante dictum est, interfluit. Et tunc aestas erat, cuius ...
Charo's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
215 views

Sub specie precariae linguae or sub specie linguae precariae?

This is a rather small doubt, but I'm currently a bit confused regarding the proper word order of an adjective-noun under a genitive form of the sort "sub specie..." Am I correct in assuming ...
Sho's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
196 views

Do we use "satis multum" + genitive to convey "a sufficient amount of"?

The following sentence comes from lines 126-128 of chapter XVI of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana: Nāvis aquā implērī incipit, neque enim nautae satis multum aquae haurīre possunt. ...
Charo's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
269 views

How to Translate "His is better"

So I too was confused about the difference between suus and eius, and came across this question and its great answers. TL,DR; suus refers back to the subject of the main clause as the possessor, ...
Nicolas Miari's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
265 views

How to identify the noun declension

I am just beginning to learn. The issue I run into is that I learned that identifying the declension of a noun means I need to know the genitive. Well…if all I have is the noun as it is written, how ...
Katie33kate 's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
116 views

How to determine when a noun is an objective genitive versus a subjective genitive?

St. Augustine writes in Soliloq. i, 10: nihil esse sentio quod magis ex arce deiiciat animum virilem quam blandimenta feminæ, corporumque ille contactus sine quo uxor haberi non potest. Is the ...
Geremia's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
340 views

Habeo with genitive

Sīc scrīpsit Forcellīni: K Græcorum littera est, non Latinorum, qui ejus loco c habent ejusdem potestatis. What is the significance of the genitive case with habeō? I gather that the sentence above ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
74 views

Synchronization primitive in latin

I want to translate in to latin some of the names for the synchronization primitives I am programming. https://www.cs.columbia.edu/~hgs/os/sync.html Semaphore was quite easy, since it means a ...
Sam H. Smith's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
356 views

What does "facti" mean in this sentence?

I am starting to read the "Novellae" in the Corpus Iuris Civilis and this sentence from the first one is confusing to read: 'et Tzanī nunc prīmum sub Rōmānōrum factī rēpublicā inter ...
VivatLinguaLatina's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
204 views

What is the syntax of ‘quamquam omnis secrētī capācissima’?

In Pliny’s letter 1.12, when he describes his meeting with his Domitian-hating friend, he mentions how all servants would leave when close friends came by, and even his wife ‘who was fully capable of ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
434 views

Why are descriptive subjects in the genitive?

I notice that in the De Naturis Animantium of Suetonius, he uses the genitive to describe the subjects of behavior. So, for example, he writes est [...] anatum tetrissitare ("it is of ducks to ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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9 votes
3 answers
772 views

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

There are some muscle names in New Latin that seem to be nouns as far as I can tell, such as flexor and extensor. However, according to several Wikipedia articles for these muscles, they behave as if ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
255 views

Which noun is the genitive describing in this sentence?

Beginner here. In "Ad familiam nautae pecuniam portabo", is nautae describing familiam or pecuniam? That is, does this translate to "I will carry the money to the sailor's family" ...
A Hood's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
518 views

Use of the Genitive

I am new to learning Latin. I have been doing exercises related to the genitive and got one wrong and I am not understanding why. The question was to translate the following into Latin - "We ...
John's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
243 views

Dealing with 2 genitives "The farmer's daughter loves the waters of the forest"

Would the right translation be this? Filia agricolae aquas silvae amat Is this correct? I feel that I'm missing something since the order of the words could be anywhere and then you would just assume ...
Johhan Santana's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
71 views

How to express shared ownership of several individuals

The distinction between shared ownership and private ownership of individuals is well illustrated in Dreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style: If Jeanette has some pencils and ...
d_e's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
256 views

How would you translate the title "A Song of Ice and Fire" into Classical Latin?

I've seen "Carmen Glaciei Ignisque", but I have some doubt with the use of genitive here. Can someone help me find examples from classical works that support the use of genitive? Or find an ...
Eugene's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
725 views

Where does the final -ς in genitive feminine singularis -ᾱς/-ης/τῆς come from?

The declination pattern for the case endings, as well as the article ὁ, ἡ, τό, seems to fairly closely match that of the grammatical endings you find in Latin: Case Latin Greek Latin Greek Latin ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
452 views

Is unius an irregular genitive?

I notice that the genitive of unus can apparently be either the regular uni, or can also be unius. Is this form, unius, just a completely irregular oddity, or is there some logical precedent for it? ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
155 views

Genitive case: why "litterarum vetustatem" and not "litteras vetustatis"

From time time I encounter a pair of nouns; one noun is in a genitive case, apparently modifies the other, but where I expect them to behave differently. examples: memoriae tradere litterarum ...
d_e's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
690 views

Is "Jacob" genitive in "jubilate deo jacob"?

"Jubilate deo Jacob" is translated everywhere as "rejoice unto the god of Jacob". But from what little I know, Jacob is not in the genitive case. May I ask if this was a ...
sunnybox_'s user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
342 views

Semantic difference between genitive and relational ("belong-to") adjectives

There is class of relational adjectives that their meaning is "belong to" "pertain to" like grammaticus. (maybe that distinction is somewhat artificial, as one can say that magnus ...
d_e's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
235 views

Agreement and possessive genitive

What we do in the following example? I need to combine two words in a phrase: 'professional' and 'holiday'. There is no adjective 'professional' in Latin or my searching is bad. So I can use the ...
TrmIntrs2's user avatar
  • 329
5 votes
4 answers
153 views

Forming compound word using "Cognitio"

Based on the existing English words describing the diet type of a species with Latin origins, I am struggling to see a clear pattern... Herbivore: "Herba" + "-vore(vorare)"? ...
Amnok River's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
88 views

Colonna as cognomen

I am working on the Italian Renaissance soldier Stefano Colonna. How would his name be written in Latin, as a label or signature, Stephanus? What is the proper genitive for "of the Colonna family"? ...
John's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
560 views

"Habere" VS dative and genitive of possession?

To mean something that is not owned legally, not owned with the meaning of "being the owner", like when I say "We have a pope", could I use "habere" or only the dative or genitive of possession? Is ...
Quidam's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
449 views

Gerundial arguments selected by verbs taking Genitive: e.g., "Memento moriendi"? "Me paenitet vivendi"?

As a follow-up of two previous questions on Latin grammar, I was wondering if examples like Memento moriendi (cf. Memento mori) and Me paenitet vivendi (cf. Me paenitet vivere) are also attested. ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
91 views

Zeugma on a genitive noun: extraordinary or prosaic?

This Reddit comment points out that there is a zeugma on a genitive noun in this sentence from the conductus "Sol oritur occasus nescius"* in the Hortus Deliciarum: Et filiæ fit pater filius I'd ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
172 views

Using genitive and infinitive to describe characteristics

Answering this question, I recalled a somewhat rare construction used to express that an action is characteristic of someone. Pekkanen's Ars Grammatica (§77.1) gives two examples: Cuiusvis hominis ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
348 views

The instances where verbs might take the genitive case

In Sixto-Clementine Vulgate we find in Genesis this verse: poenituit eum quod hominum fecisset in terra (Genesis 6:6) "hominum" is in the genetive case which I find strange. I try searching for ...
d_e's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
72 views

Genitive with assigno

In Ethics, De Dei, Proposition 11, Second demonstration we read: Cujuscunque rei assignari debet causa seu ratio tam cur existit quam cur non existit cujuscunque rei is genitive, but ...
Ali Nikzad's user avatar
  • 1,567
3 votes
2 answers
112 views

On the use (or not) of genitive in some verses of the Vulgata

I'm a bit puzzled with some verses of the Vulgata, regarding the use or not of genitive. Consider 3 Regnum (1 Kings in non LXX-based bibles). Verses 13-15 in Chapter 10 go as follows: [13] Rex ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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8 votes
3 answers
972 views

Differentiating possessive and non-possessive uses of the genitive

In English, genitives formed with " 's " often have a possessive meaning, while "of" may function to form a kind of "genitive" with a non-possessive meaning, e.g., compare "John's photo" and "a photo ...
Disenchanted Toad's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
81 views

Translating "order of protection and conservation"

An author friend recently asked me for help with a Latin name: in his book, a group calls itself the "order of protection and conservation", but in Latin to be pretentious (altum videtur…). My ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
445 views

Why is plural of “mons pubis” not “montes pubum”

Latin newbie here. Was talking with a friend about Martian landforms like Olympus Mons. Then we talked about other uses of mons, like mons pubis. But then I realized I didn’t understand something. ...
user3048's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
664 views

Plural genitive in 1st and 2nd declension - how were mixed genders treated?

Genitive plural personal nouns in 1st and 2nd declension: I am wondering how human possessors of mixed gender were treated in ancient Latin. For example, how would the following possessive be ...
K Wilson's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
312 views

How should "Aurora's Vow" be translated into Latin?

I haven't taken Latin in a few years, so forgive me for any simple mistakes. I'm trying to translate "Aurora's Vow" from English to Latin for the title of a song I'm writing. My question is how it ...
Dirge of Dreams's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
448 views

Mors mea or mors meī?

If I wanted to talk about "the death of Caesar", I wouldn't think twice about using the genitive (mors Caesaris). But if you asked me what sort of genitive this is—possessive, partitive, or objective—...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
1k views

Translation: Out of my death, new life

I took a Latin course a few years ago, and now I'm trying my hand for a friend's tattoo. Is my translation of the title correct? English: Out of my death, new life. Latin attempt: Ex mei mortis ...
Alexander Skage's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
121 views

Ambiguity in "Illīus hominis fīlium laudābant omnēs"?

Each question below assumes that any previous question has been answered with a yes. Is ille ever used alone as that is used in this sentence? That is a good idea. Is illīus ever used alone as of ...
Catomic's user avatar
  • 1,513
5 votes
3 answers
2k views

Using "ad" vs. dative

The self-exercises in CAPVT VIII of Wheelock's Latin (7th Edition) include the following sentence (#11): Litterās ad virginem scrībit. He is writing a letter to the maiden. I'm confused about ...
mhartl's user avatar
  • 221
2 votes
1 answer
370 views

What case is virtutis in "prope virum summae virtutis sto"?

Consider the sentence, "prope virum summae virtutis sto." What case is virtutis and why? I'm pretty sure that it is genitive due to description, but I'm not sure. In case it helps, I translated it as,...
BlackCoffee's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
540 views

Plural genitive endings in -i

This is a speculative question that (I hope) has a good answer from historical linguistics. My starting observation was that all nouns appear to have a plural genitive ending in -um: -arum, -orum, -(...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
337 views

Are there Roman examples of "of Rome" instead of "Roman"?

In my experience it is extremely common to say, for example, rex Romanus instead of rex Romae. In fact, I do not recall ever seeing a genitive when a local adjective can be used. Translating to ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
314 views

Genitive of Sappho: Sapphonis or Sapphus?

As I posted on the Wiktionary Tea Room: Consulting Bergk's edition of Sappho, I have seem various instances of this genitive "Sapphonis" (e.g. «Sapphonis esse videtur») in the critical notes. This ...
MickG's user avatar
  • 3,275
8 votes
1 answer
319 views

How common is the genitive plural ending -um in the first declension?

In an answer, Draconis said the genitive plural -um (instead of -arum) is sometimes used in the first declension. Now, while -um is fairly common in poetry and with certain specific words, like deum, ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
244 views

What is the proper translation of "Victoriarum Romae" (two genitives in a row)?

I was given the exercise to translate Victoriarum Romae into English. It's not a part of some bigger text: that's all I was given. I don't feel confident about my translation, "Of the victories of ...
copper's user avatar
  • 971
7 votes
1 answer
124 views

Unnecessary genitive being used with 'suum'

I am not sure how to translate Augustus affirmāvit genūs suum ab Iove ortum esse. One can logically conclude that this much of the sentence is correct... Augustus affirmed that ... ...
user062295's user avatar
12 votes
4 answers
1k views

Expressing a possession relationship without the genitive?

I have the following sentence: Clara est insula Sicilia What I initially thought: Sicily is a famous island (This doesn't seem to make sense considering how the sentence is set up, but who ...
copper's user avatar
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