Questions tagged [genitive]

For questions about the genitive case.

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14
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1answer
344 views

Translating "Nocte volat caelī mediō"

Line 184 of Vergil's Aeneid, Book IV, begins as follows: Nocte volat caelī mediō Would this be translated as "She of the sky flies in the middle of the night", or "At night she flies in the middle ...
13
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1answer
1k views

Prepositions/adpositions with genitive?

In Latin, there are prepositions that may be followed by a noun in accusative (like ad), ablative (cum) or both (in). I once thought ope was a preposition to be used with genitive, which I found ...
12
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1answer
1k views

Genitive vs Ablative of Price

In Latin, worth or value can be expressed by the genitive or by the ablative. Here are some examples: Genitive Non pono utrique par pretium: pluris aestimo beneficium quam iniuriam. (Sen Ep. Mor. 81....
12
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1answer
234 views

How to form the plural of "noun plus noun in possessive case"?

I would like to know what are the rules to form the plural of a noun plus a noun in possessive case. I am not sure if this is a correct description of what I am interested in let me give an example. ...
11
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4answers
1k views

Expressing a possession relationship without the genitive?

I have the following sentence: Clara est insula Sicilia What I initially thought: Sicily is a famous island (This doesn't seem to make sense considering how the sentence is set up, but who ...
11
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3answers
402 views

How to work around the missing cases of vis?

The word vis does not have singular genitive and dative forms. This makes it difficult to use vis. (I was reminded of this difficulty by this Star Wars question.) Can you suggest methods of working ...
11
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2answers
521 views

Is -um (instead of -ōrum) a typical genitive plural ending outside of poetry?

I understand that Vergil often uses the -um genitive plural ending for some second declension nouns, instead of -ōrum. For example: huc delecta virum sortiti corpora furtim (Aeneid, Book II, line ...
10
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2answers
144 views

Ambiguitas casus genitivi?

The first sentence of the introduction to the Systema Naturæ by Linnaeus is: Homo mundi intraturus theatrum quæritur Quis sit. How do you tell what noun goes with mundi? Grammatically, two ...
10
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1answer
390 views

Use of the Genitive

I am new to learning Latin. I have been doing exercises related to the genitive and got one wrong and I am not understanding why. The question was to translate the following into Latin - "We ...
10
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1answer
256 views

How to write a sentence with two genitives describing one noun

I would like to translate the following sentence into Latin. Minerva is the goddess of wisdom and of wool. My first guess would be, Minerva est dea sapientiae et lanae. But I'm not sure ...
10
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1answer
1k views

Miserere mei! Miserere nostri! Why genitive?

Why is the object of mercy ("me", "us") rendered in the genitive in these two cases? miserere mei (Psalm li) miserere nostri (Psalm cxxi) I would expect accusative, or even dative. But, genitive ...
9
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3answers
693 views

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

There are some muscle names in New Latin that seem to be nouns as far as I can tell, such as flexor and extensor. However, according to several Wikipedia articles for these muscles, they behave as if ...
9
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4answers
686 views

Forms of 2nd Declension Neuter Nouns ending in -ium

The 2nd Declension Neuter endings are: Singular Nom: -um Gen: -ī Dat: -ō Acc: -um Abl: -ō Plural Nom: -a Gen: -ōrum Dat: -īs Acc: -a Abl: -īs With a word such as auxilium (meaning help, aid), which ...
9
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1answer
348 views

When to use a genitive pronoun instead of a possessive adjective

The genitive form of the personal pronouns (e.g. mei, tui, nostri, nostrum, etc.) seem to occur fairly often in the following contexts: Partitive genitive: to indicate a part of some whole. Quis ...
8
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2answers
658 views

Is "Jacob" genitive in "jubilate deo jacob"?

"Jubilate deo Jacob" is translated everywhere as "rejoice unto the god of Jacob". But from what little I know, Jacob is not in the genitive case. May I ask if this was a ...
8
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2answers
654 views

Where does the final -ς in genitive feminine singularis -ᾱς/-ης/τῆς come from?

The declination pattern for the case endings, as well as the article ὁ, ἡ, τό, seems to fairly closely match that of the grammatical endings you find in Latin: Case Latin Greek Latin Greek Latin ...
8
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3answers
465 views

What are the normal genitive and dative singular forms of "alius"?

Some sources mention a genitive singular alius, but I've also seen aliae. And I don't recall seeing a dative singular ali, but neither do I remember alio. I think several forms exist, including even ...
8
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3answers
554 views

Differentiating possessive and non-possessive uses of the genitive

In English, genitives formed with " 's " often have a possessive meaning, while "of" may function to form a kind of "genitive" with a non-possessive meaning, e.g., compare "John's photo" and "a photo ...
7
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2answers
3k views

What is the difference between suus and eius?

What is the difference between the possessive adjective suus (his, hers, its, theirs) (and its declensions) and the genitive, possessive pronoun eius (of her, of him, of it)? Can these words be ...
7
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2answers
4k views

Expressing the relationship "his" in latin

So I have the following sentence which I have to translate into Latin: The farmer gives his daughter water. The parts which I found easy: Agricola ... aquam dat. I don't know how to express "his" ...
7
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1answer
251 views

How common is the genitive plural ending -um in the first declension?

In an answer, Draconis said the genitive plural -um (instead of -arum) is sometimes used in the first declension. Now, while -um is fairly common in poetry and with certain specific words, like deum, ...
6
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2answers
342 views

Mors mea or mors meī?

If I wanted to talk about "the death of Caesar", I wouldn't think twice about using the genitive (mors Caesaris). But if you asked me what sort of genitive this is—possessive, partitive, or objective—...
6
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1answer
103 views

Unnecessary genitive being used with 'suum'

I am not sure how to translate Augustus affirmāvit genūs suum ab Iove ortum esse. One can logically conclude that this much of the sentence is correct... Augustus affirmed that ... ...
6
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1answer
234 views

Are there Roman examples of "of Rome" instead of "Roman"?

In my experience it is extremely common to say, for example, rex Romanus instead of rex Romae. In fact, I do not recall ever seeing a genitive when a local adjective can be used. Translating to ...
6
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1answer
116 views

Peneus River (Metamorphoses 1.567–572)

I just worked on translating a passage that was very difficult for me, and not without a lot of help from online resources. Here is the passage below: Est nemus Haemoniae, praerupta quod undique ...
6
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1answer
267 views

"Habere" VS dative and genitive of possession?

To mean something that is not owned legally, not owned with the meaning of "being the owner", like when I say "We have a pope", could I use "habere" or only the dative or genitive of possession? Is ...
6
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1answer
47 views

Translating "order of protection and conservation"

An author friend recently asked me for help with a Latin name: in his book, a group calls itself the "order of protection and conservation", but in Latin to be pretentious (altum videtur…). My ...
5
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3answers
1k views

Using "ad" vs. dative

The self-exercises in CAPVT VIII of Wheelock's Latin (7th Edition) include the following sentence (#11): Litterās ad virginem scrībit. He is writing a letter to the maiden. I'm confused about ...
5
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2answers
200 views

Was -i used as genitive ending for first declension masculines?

In Greek masculines of the first declension borrow the singular genitive ending -ου from second declension. Latin uses the ending -ae for all of first declension: puellae, nautae, ...
5
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4answers
128 views

Forming compound word using "Cognitio"

Based on the existing English words describing the diet type of a species with Latin origins, I am struggling to see a clear pattern... Herbivore: "Herba" + "-vore(vorare)"? ...
5
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1answer
243 views

Which noun is the genitive describing in this sentence?

Beginner here. In "Ad familiam nautae pecuniam portabo", is nautae describing familiam or pecuniam? That is, does this translate to "I will carry the money to the sailor's family" ...
5
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1answer
317 views

The instances where verbs might take the genitive case

In Sixto-Clementine Vulgate we find in Genesis this verse: poenituit eum quod hominum fecisset in terra (Genesis 6:6) "hominum" is in the genetive case which I find strange. I try searching for ...
5
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1answer
151 views

Can I combine a possessive pronoun and the genitive of a noun?

Today in chat we spoke briefly about an earlier discussion I had had with Cerberus in Latin. (In case you did not know, we have a chatroom for this site.) I realized that I do not know how to put both ...
5
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1answer
470 views

Translation: Out of my death, new life

I took a Latin course a few years ago, and now I'm trying my hand for a friend's tattoo. Is my translation of the title correct? English: Out of my death, new life. Latin attempt: Ex mei mortis ...
5
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2answers
333 views

Plural genitive endings in -i

This is a speculative question that (I hope) has a good answer from historical linguistics. My starting observation was that all nouns appear to have a plural genitive ending in -um: -arum, -orum, -(...
5
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1answer
192 views

What is the proper translation of "Victoriarum Romae" (two genitives in a row)?

I was given the exercise to translate Victoriarum Romae into English. It's not a part of some bigger text: that's all I was given. I don't feel confident about my translation, "Of the victories of ...
5
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1answer
297 views

Comparing ablative and genitive of quality

The ablative and genitive of quality (ablativus qualitatis and genetivus qualitatis) are similar. One can describe a high mountain as mons magna altitudine or mons magnae altitudinis. Is there any ...
5
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1answer
80 views

Colonna as cognomen

I am working on the Italian Renaissance soldier Stefano Colonna. How would his name be written in Latin, as a label or signature, Stephanus? What is the proper genitive for "of the Colonna family"? ...
5
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2answers
199 views

How would you translate the title "A Song of Ice and Fire" into Classical Latin?

I've seen "Carmen Glaciei Ignisque", but I have some doubt with the use of genitive here. Can someone help me find examples from classical works that support the use of genitive? Or find an ...
5
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1answer
112 views

Genitive case: why "litterarum vetustatem" and not "litteras vetustatis"

From time time I encounter a pair of nouns; one noun is in a genitive case, apparently modifies the other, but where I expect them to behave differently. examples: memoriae tradere litterarum ...
5
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1answer
102 views

Ambiguity in "Illīus hominis fīlium laudābant omnēs"?

Each question below assumes that any previous question has been answered with a yes. Is ille ever used alone as that is used in this sentence? That is a good idea. Is illīus ever used alone as of ...
4
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2answers
266 views

Genitive of Sappho: Sapphonis or Sapphus?

As I posted on the Wiktionary Tea Room: Consulting Bergk's edition of Sappho, I have seem various instances of this genitive "Sapphonis" (e.g. «Sapphonis esse videtur») in the critical notes. This ...
4
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2answers
161 views

Dealing with 2 genitives "The farmer's daughter loves the waters of the forest"

Would the right translation be this? Filia agricolae aquas silvae amat Is this correct? I feel that I'm missing something since the order of the words could be anywhere and then you would just assume ...
4
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1answer
272 views

Is unius an irregular genitive?

I notice that the genitive of unus can apparently be either the regular uni, or can also be unius. Is this form, unius, just a completely irregular oddity, or is there some logical precedent for it? ...
4
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2answers
344 views

Why is plural of “mons pubis” not “montes pubum”

Latin newbie here. Was talking with a friend about Martian landforms like Olympus Mons. Then we talked about other uses of mons, like mons pubis. But then I realized I didn’t understand something. ...
4
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1answer
290 views

How should "Aurora's Vow" be translated into Latin?

I haven't taken Latin in a few years, so forgive me for any simple mistakes. I'm trying to translate "Aurora's Vow" from English to Latin for the title of a song I'm writing. My question is how it ...
4
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0answers
63 views

How to express shared ownership of several individuals

The distinction between shared ownership and private ownership of individuals is well illustrated in Dreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style: If Jeanette has some pencils and ...
3
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2answers
551 views

Plural genitive in 1st and 2nd declension - how were mixed genders treated?

Genitive plural personal nouns in 1st and 2nd declension: I am wondering how human possessors of mixed gender were treated in ancient Latin. For example, how would the following possessive be ...
3
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2answers
104 views

Using genitive and infinitive to describe characteristics

Answering this question, I recalled a somewhat rare construction used to express that an action is characteristic of someone. Pekkanen's Ars Grammatica (§77.1) gives two examples: Cuiusvis hominis ...
3
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2answers
79 views

On the use (or not) of genitive in some verses of the Vulgata

I'm a bit puzzled with some verses of the Vulgata, regarding the use or not of genitive. Consider 3 Regnum (1 Kings in non LXX-based bibles). Verses 13-15 in Chapter 10 go as follows: [13] Rex ...