Questions tagged [genitive]

For questions about the genitive case.

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9
votes
1answer
348 views

When to use a genitive pronoun instead of a possessive adjective

The genitive form of the personal pronouns (e.g. mei, tui, nostri, nostrum, etc.) seem to occur fairly often in the following contexts: Partitive genitive: to indicate a part of some whole. Quis ...
12
votes
1answer
1k views

Genitive vs Ablative of Price

In Latin, worth or value can be expressed by the genitive or by the ablative. Here are some examples: Genitive Non pono utrique par pretium: pluris aestimo beneficium quam iniuriam. (Sen Ep. Mor. 81....
11
votes
2answers
521 views

Is -um (instead of -ōrum) a typical genitive plural ending outside of poetry?

I understand that Vergil often uses the -um genitive plural ending for some second declension nouns, instead of -ōrum. For example: huc delecta virum sortiti corpora furtim (Aeneid, Book II, line ...
13
votes
1answer
1k views

Prepositions/adpositions with genitive?

In Latin, there are prepositions that may be followed by a noun in accusative (like ad), ablative (cum) or both (in). I once thought ope was a preposition to be used with genitive, which I found ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

What is the difference between suus and eius?

What is the difference between the possessive adjective suus (his, hers, its, theirs) (and its declensions) and the genitive, possessive pronoun eius (of her, of him, of it)? Can these words be ...
3
votes
2answers
105 views

Using genitive and infinitive to describe characteristics

Answering this question, I recalled a somewhat rare construction used to express that an action is characteristic of someone. Pekkanen's Ars Grammatica (§77.1) gives two examples: Cuiusvis hominis ...
10
votes
1answer
1k views

Miserere mei! Miserere nostri! Why genitive?

Why is the object of mercy ("me", "us") rendered in the genitive in these two cases? miserere mei (Psalm li) miserere nostri (Psalm cxxi) I would expect accusative, or even dative. But, genitive ...
14
votes
1answer
344 views

Translating "Nocte volat caelī mediō"

Line 184 of Vergil's Aeneid, Book IV, begins as follows: Nocte volat caelī mediō Would this be translated as "She of the sky flies in the middle of the night", or "At night she flies in the middle ...
12
votes
1answer
234 views

How to form the plural of "noun plus noun in possessive case"?

I would like to know what are the rules to form the plural of a noun plus a noun in possessive case. I am not sure if this is a correct description of what I am interested in let me give an example. ...
3
votes
0answers
73 views

Zeugma on a genitive noun: extraordinary or prosaic?

This Reddit comment points out that there is a zeugma on a genitive noun in this sentence from the conductus "Sol oritur occasus nescius"* in the Hortus Deliciarum: Et filiæ fit pater filius I'd ...
2
votes
0answers
54 views

Semantic difference between genitive and "belong-to" adjectives

There is class of adjectives that their meaning is "belong to" "pertain to" like grammaticus. (maybe that distinction is somewhat artificial, as one can say that magnus is "...
11
votes
4answers
1k views

Expressing a possession relationship without the genitive?

I have the following sentence: Clara est insula Sicilia What I initially thought: Sicily is a famous island (This doesn't seem to make sense considering how the sentence is set up, but who ...
6
votes
2answers
342 views

Mors mea or mors meī?

If I wanted to talk about "the death of Caesar", I wouldn't think twice about using the genitive (mors Caesaris). But if you asked me what sort of genitive this is—possessive, partitive, or objective—...
5
votes
1answer
472 views

Translation: Out of my death, new life

I took a Latin course a few years ago, and now I'm trying my hand for a friend's tattoo. Is my translation of the title correct? English: Out of my death, new life. Latin attempt: Ex mei mortis ...