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Questions tagged [gender]

For questions about grammatical gender (masculine, feminine, neuter).

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Why is πλοῦτος sometimes neuter?

I was reading some of the letters of St. Paul recently and noticed that πλοῦτος is sometimes neuter, e.g. Ephesians 1:7: . . . ἐν ᾧ ἔχομεν τὴν ἀπολύτρωσιν διὰ τοῦ αἵματος αὐτοῦ, τὴν ἄφεσιν τῶν ...
brianpck's user avatar
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4 votes
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83 views

Why do emasculatus and effeminatus mean the SAME thing, despite being formed the SAME way with OPPOSITE morphemes? [duplicate]

The etymological constructions of emasculatus and effeminatus are identical: emasculatus < ex- + masculus + -atus effeminatus < ex- + femina + -atus Since masculus and femina are opposites, ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
239 views

Shouldn't adducti in this sentence be feminine?

This is a Ceasar's sentence: Hac oratione adducti inter se fidem et ius iurandum dant et regno occupato per tres potentissimos ac firmissimos populos totius Galliae sese potiri posse sperant. Hac = ...
hellofriends's user avatar
10 votes
3 answers
2k views

Lack of gender agreement in Aeneid iv.169-70

I was thrown by the lack of gender agreement in line iv.169 of the Aeneidː Ille dies primus leti primusque malorum // causa fuit; I translate: “That was the first day of death, and was the first ...
adam.baker's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

Both 'masculus' and 'vir' mean man/male: what's the difference?

In Latin, masculus means male. Noun masculus m (genitive masculī); second declension a male (of humans or other animals) In Latin, vir also means male. Noun vir m (genitive virī); second ...
user14417's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
614 views

Why feminine is used in "haec locuta"?

The following sentence comes from lines 74–75 of chapter XXV of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana, after Ariadna has said some words to Theseus: Haec locūta, Ariadna Thēseō fīlum longum ...
Charo's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
121 views

Is there a meaning behind 'mater' and 'pater' beyond mother and father?

I ask because i vaguely remember pater, the latin root for father, also having the meaning 'to protect' or 'to lead'? A fairly thorough google search has yet to substantiate that so I might have just ...
user14310's user avatar
13 votes
2 answers
3k views

Did Latin have the same gender labels that the Romance languages have?

I'm curious about the concept and origin of gendered nouns. In a modern romance language such as Spanish, nouns are masculine or feminine which I'll describe as anthropomorphic labels. From my ...
pinoyyid's user avatar
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-3 votes
2 answers
260 views

Are vir and fémina counterparts of each other?

pater means father, and mater means mother, and the two words have similar forms. vir means "man; husband", and fémina means "woman; wife". But the two words look very different ...
Tim's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why is virtis a feminine noun, when it can mean "manliness"? [duplicate]

Keller's Learn to Read Latin says virtis, virtutis f. is an abstract noun formed by the addition of the suffix -tis to the stem of the noun vir. Its specific sense is thus "manliness" or “...
Tim's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
1k views

What is the gender of the word "Haec" in Latin?

"post haec in terris visus est et cum hominibus conversatus est" I have no knowledge of Latin language. This is a verse from the Latin Vulagate bible. Most translations have this verse ...
Language Enthusiast's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
204 views

Gender of antecedent of "hoc" in phrase "hoc quod"?

In the construction "hoc quod", can the antecedent of "hoc" (neuter) be indifferently a masculine, neuter, or feminine noun; or must the gender agree (i.e., the antecedent be ...
Geremia's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
205 views

Is an infinitive as a noun neuter in gender?

On p37 in Keller's Learn to Read Latin: The infinitive is an abstract verbal noun in the neuter singular. It is indeclinable; that is, although it is a noun, it does not have case endings, and it ...
Tim's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
122 views

To Latin, what is the gender of an English word?

Suppose one writes, in English, a sentence in which some Latin is embedded, such as Eventually, they declared the rodent to be a squirrel non grata in their garden. Of course this alludes to the ...
user570286's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why does canis have both masculine and feminine forms?

Most nouns in Latin (and e.g. Spanish) have only one gender. Some other have two (epicene nouns). canis is one example (Separate Q: are there more examples?) I wonder why is that the case for canis. ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
764 views

Struggling with the neuter gender when translating this movie quote

I'm trying to translate, "If it can bleed, we can kill it," but I'm really confused about how the neuter gender would work in this case. The closest version I got to thus far has been "...
mig81's user avatar
  • 263
7 votes
3 answers
959 views

regem Balæ, ipsa est Segor

I’m a bit stumped about why in the phrase in the question title (Vulgate, Gen. 14:2), it’s ipsa and not ipse. What is the feminine noun to which ipsa refers? inirent bellum contra Bara regem ...
D. A. Hosek's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
407 views

Why ipsa and not ipsae in Psalms 42:3?

Psalms 42:3 in the Vulgate has: Emitte lucem tuam et veritatem tuam. Ipsa me deduxerunt... Why is it ipsa and not ipsae?
John White's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
316 views

why all tree names in Latin are femininum? [duplicate]

Why most of the tree names in Latin are femininum? Is there any historical/etymological reason for it? quercus [quercūs, f.] betula [betulæ, f.] alnus [alni, f.] fraxinus [fraxini, f.] populus [...
Petr Chloupek's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
77 views

Is neuter verb agreement of mīlia when paired with animate genitives a confirmed usage?

Having just reviewed this question, I find that I am surprised by the verb agreement in this sentence: Nam d[ecum] mīlia Americānōrum cōnāta sunt ad centiēs centēna mīlia dollāriōrum raedāriīs mittere ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
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109 views

What does "arcularia" mean in the species name "Nassarius arcularia"?

I encountered the species name Nassarius arcularia and I'm very confused about its construction. Per Wikipedia, this name refers to a species of "nassa mud snails" or "dog whelks". ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
495 views

What is the gender and singular declension of the scientific Latin suffix -idae?

The scientific suffix -idae is used to form names of subclasses of plants or families of animals, e.g. Bovidae. In scientific writing (in English and German), the resulting words are treated as plural ...
Lukas G's user avatar
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7 votes
0 answers
95 views

Is this use of elliptical neuter superlatives un-Ciceronian?

This may be an oddly specific question, but I've run across comments online that suggest the following usages found in Pliny the Elder's Natural History would not be valid in the Latin of Cicero: Ad ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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8 votes
3 answers
905 views

Dictionaries always list the Neuter Participle in principal forms, why?

I noticed that the principal forms of verbs always only include the neuter participle form, e.g. vocare - voco, vocavi, vocatum Is there a reason I've never seen the following? vocare - voco, ...
Cyb3rKo's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
340 views

Are ἄρσην, ἄρσις and θήλυ, θέσις etymologically related?

In Mt. 19:14, "άρσεν και θήλυ" means "male and female". In music terminology ἄρσις means a stressed/emphasized sound, and θέσις the corresponding unstressed one. Is ἄρσις ...
Geremia's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
281 views

Second declension feminine plants

Is there any reason why some well-known plant names, especially tree names, are feminine, but 2nd declension? (now interested in classical, not scientific ones). For example: Trees: aesculus alnus ...
Vladimir F Героям слава's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
108 views

Gender ambiquity of the 3rd person

In most cases I find Latin is much more specific than English, but there are some exceptions. For example, it seems like the use of the 3rd person singular is often ambiguous with regards to gender. ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
262 views

Why is it "Discipulus pulcher est" and not "Discipulus pulchrus est"?

I think its something with declension, but can't quite wrap my head around why it would be pulcher instead of pulchrus for that phrase.
hifromdev's user avatar
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8 votes
3 answers
907 views

Why is Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum in the feminine?

I often consult a website called Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum of Latin writings on music theory and practice. Note that the web address changes every couple of years. Why "musicarum latinarum&...
Coemgenus's user avatar
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12 votes
0 answers
242 views

Why is "porticus, porticūs" a feminine fourth-declension noun?

The fourth declension was one of the less common inflection pattern for Latin nouns, and the vast majority of fourth declension nouns are masculine nouns ending in the deverbal abstract noun suffix -...
Asteroides's user avatar
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13 votes
1 answer
658 views

Why are so many Latin men's names (cognomina) in the usually-feminine first declension?

The first declension, with the -a ending, is usually feminine. Why are so many men's names (cognomina), however, in the first declension -- Seneca, Cinna, Aggrippa, Sulla, and more? This is far out of ...
Joshua Fox's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
424 views

Quem or quid when asking what something is buying?

I am not sure whether to say "Quem emit Iulius?" or "Quid emit Iulius?" if I want to know what Julius is buying. I know the interrogative pronoun should be in the accusative case ...
user1488's user avatar
  • 193
13 votes
2 answers
8k views

Feminine case 3rd-person version of “Veni, vidi, vici”

How does the famous saying: Veni, vidi, vici. have to be changed so that it describes a female person, such as in English: She came, she saw, she conquered. Reversing Google Translate gives ...
Ken Edwards's user avatar
12 votes
3 answers
967 views

How to decline a whale?

The Latin word cētus (a whale or some other major sea creature) behaves peculiarly. In singular it is a normal-looking masculine cētus, but in plural it is a neuter cētē. The ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
120 views

Why is Novarupta feminine?

Today is the anniversary of the Novarupta eruption, the largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. Nova rupta is of course good Latin for "new broken thing", where the thing in question is ...
Figulus's user avatar
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19 votes
3 answers
2k views

Is any animal neuter in Latin?

The word animal itself is neuter in Latin, but at least all of the common animal species seem to be masculine or feminine (or common gender): canis, feles, equus, pardus, leo/leaena, lupus/lupa, ursus/...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
464 views

Can a predicate nominative ever be a different gender from the subject?

I want to say "My favorite animal is..." and then give the animal. But "animal" is neuter, so I'll end up with a predicate nominative that doesn't agree in gender with the subject! "Meum dilectum ...
Donna's user avatar
  • 71
5 votes
1 answer
111 views

Is there a Latin equivalent to ἐπίκοινος?

The Ancient Greek grammatical tradition, going back to Dionysius Thrax (or maybe farther), distinguishes five types of nouns: masculine, feminine, neuter, common, and epicene (ἐπίκοινος). Four of ...
Draconis's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
598 views

Is there a short list of feminine nouns in -ος?

Schoder and Horrigan (p. 23) say that a noun whose nominative ends in -ος, although "Three [feminine] exceptions ... will be noted in the vacabularies when they first occur." I originally took this to ...
user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
265 views

masculine and feminine form of παῖς and μαθηματικός

As in a previous question, I'm wondering what is the feminine form of a noun, and this time it is not a word for an animal but for human. In words like ὁ παῖς and ἡ παῖς, only their article ...
kore's user avatar
  • 517
4 votes
1 answer
272 views

Can gender be kept from Latin to a descend language? Are there patterns for this?

I read this in a random forum: "Words neuter in Latin become masculine in Spanish" (For instance "vāsum" = el vaso) Could it be some patterns making predictable the gender from Latin to a descend ...
Quidam's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
2k views

Why can "bubo" ("owl") be feminine or masculine?

Why the occurrence of "bubo" in the Virgilius text is an hapax? This text is the only one listed in Lewis & Short with "bubo" being feminine. Usually, it's a masculine noun. So, it is an hapax. ...
Quidam's user avatar
  • 1,796
7 votes
3 answers
1k views

Confused about the use of "quae" as an interrogative word

Sometimes, I read that "quae" could be used, not only as a relative word, but also as an interrogative word. Sometimes I read that it's not like that in the correct usage. Quote, from a fellow Latin ...
Quidam's user avatar
  • 1,796
5 votes
1 answer
308 views

How did the Romans refer to people of unknown gender?

Reference to other people's gender has become a delicate issue in today's world. I expect that the Romans had no controversy over it, but they must have encountered situations where they have to write ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
316 views

When a Greek word is borrowed by Latin, does it keep the same gender?

When a Greek word is borrowed by Latin, does it keep the same gender that it had in Greek? For example, a question arose about the word platysma, a muscle in the neck. It undoubtedly comes from ...
Penelope's user avatar
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11 votes
3 answers
3k views

Are there nouns that change meaning based on gender?

I was looking through a feature in some Romance languages, Spanish and French, where nouns in Spanish change depending on gender. I was wondering if Latin had a few of these. Here are examples in ...
Lenny's user avatar
  • 213
12 votes
2 answers
2k views

Does Latin have any neuter words for humans?

In Ancient Greek, diminutives are almost always neuter, regardless of the original noun's gender. This leads to words like paidíon, "small child" (from país "child"), which are neuter even though they ...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes
0 answers
541 views

What is known about the feminine natural gender for trees in classical Latin?

It is a well known fact of Latin grammar, that trees follow natural gender and are always feminine, even when the word form would suggest masculine gender, as in populus "poplar". What does motivate ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
473 views

Mihi legendum/legenda est?

I've another question about Coniugatio periphrastica passiva. If I'm a girl and I wanted to say I need to read, would it be: Mihi legendum est. Or Mihi legenda est. So, does the gerundivum ...
lmc's user avatar
  • 391
6 votes
1 answer
106 views

Is "their" being masculine or feminine?

The phrase I'm wondering about is "causas sui odii" — 'the cause of their hatred'. The men are discussing the cause of their (the men's) hatred? or the cause of their (the women's) hatred? If ...
Narf's user avatar
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