Skip to main content

Questions tagged [gaius-iulius-caesar]

Questions relating to the works of Gaius Julius Caesar (general, politician and author, 100–44 BC).

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2 votes
1 answer
114 views

How to correct say: "Gaius de deo" or "Gaius de dei" or "Gaius de deus"?

I wanna say "Gaius from god" in Latin. That means God create Gaius or God send Gaius out. How to correct say: "Gaius de deo" or "Gaius de dei" or "Gaius de deus"...
Fakt309's user avatar
  • 121
3 votes
1 answer
178 views

Translation Problems in "de Bello Alexandrino"

The authorship of "de Bello Alexandrino" is disputed. Did Julius Caesar write all or just some of it? The Wiki article ("de B. A") is worth reading and this Q :Why are *De Bello ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,752
5 votes
1 answer
283 views

Translation of "Qua de causa"

This is a from the very beginning of the Caesar's De Bello Gallico. The first question is about its translation as "For which reason". In English, it's supposed to be in a single sentence , ...
Maizi Wu's user avatar
  • 105
5 votes
2 answers
218 views

Grammar of rogatum auxilium, askee modified instead of asker

In the following passage from De Bello Gallico 11, I do not understand why rogatum apparently agrees with Caesar (or maybe modifies auxilium?) instead of legatos: Aedui, cum se suaque ab eis defendere ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,001
4 votes
1 answer
334 views

Why is "cum" used in this sentence from "De Bello Gallico"?

This sentence comes from Caesar's De Bello Gallico (emphasis mine in the part I'm trying to understand): Dum haec a Caesare geruntur, Treveri magnis coactis peditatus equitatusque copiis Labienum cum ...
Charo's user avatar
  • 2,092
4 votes
1 answer
196 views

Greek "datives of agent" in Latin classical prose?

When including the following poetic examples from Horace and Ovid in what turned out to be a long answer to a previous post on datives of agent, I made this hesitant remark: Perhaps I'm wrong but I'd ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
4 votes
1 answer
879 views

How to say They came, they saw, they conquered in Latin?

I would like to translate the famous Julius Caesar quote into the third person plural: They Came, They Saw, They Conqurered.
Anna Ni Fhiannusa's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
137 views

Different versions of De Bello Gallico?

I seem to have encountered different versions of Caesar's De Bello Gallico. For example, in Book I, section 53, one version reads like this: ...incidit in Caesarem ipsum persequentem equitatem hostium....
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,001
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

Infinitive with “cum”

Hi all—I’m making my way through De Bello Gallico and came across the following (from Ch. 3): “His rebus adducti et auctoritate Orgetorigis permoti, constituerunt ea quae ad proficiscendum pertineret ...
CFD's user avatar
  • 81
11 votes
1 answer
4k views

Origin and actual quote of the proverb "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion"

While searching for the Latin quote of the proverb "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion", I was a bit surprised because the form that I know of that proverb was "It's not enough for ...
Leonardo's user avatar
  • 213
4 votes
1 answer
290 views

Is there a difference in meaning between "reliquiis in locis" and "alibi"?

Caesar wrote in De Bello Gallico: "Ea nascuntur alces, animalia quae reliquis in locis visa non sint.". Why didn't he simply write "alibi" there? Is there a difference in meaning? ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
126 views

Does "Ob Eam Causam" introduce an indirect question

I apologize if there's an obvious answer here I'm missing, but I can't figure out why this line from De Bello Gallico 5.33 is subjunctive: "At Cotta, qui cogitasset haec posse in itinere accidere ...
Joan's user avatar
  • 49
7 votes
3 answers
541 views

Grammatical structure of "Obsidibus imperatis centum hos Haeduis custodiendos tradit"

@Mitomino points out in this comment that my understanding of what modifies what in the sentence shown below from De Bello Gallico (VI.4.3) is mistaken. I'll diagram my understanding below. Can you ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 15.9k
13 votes
2 answers
8k views

Feminine case 3rd-person version of “Veni, vidi, vici”

How does the famous saying: Veni, vidi, vici. have to be changed so that it describes a female person, such as in English: She came, she saw, she conquered. Reversing Google Translate gives ...
Ken Edwards's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
97 views

What surviving sources describe the civil war between Caesar and Pompeius?

The famous Civil War is best known from Caesar's own account of it. But we also have Lucan's epic Pharsalia, and a fairly thorough account in Cassius Dio's histories. Livy's account, and likely many ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
8 votes
1 answer
532 views

Translation of a Line from Caesar's De Bello Gallico 5.29

I am currently having trouble working through a line from Caesar's De Bello Gallico Cottae quidem atque eorum, qui dissentirent, consilium quem habere exitum? Currently, I have this as "Indeed ...
Sapphira's user avatar
  • 2,093
9 votes
1 answer
463 views

Translation of a Line from Caesar's De Bello Gallico

I'm struggling with translating a line from Book 4, Chapter 35 from Caesar's De Bello Gallico. Here is the Latin portion (bolded) with context. Caesar, etsi idem quod superioribus diebus acciderat ...
Sapphira's user avatar
  • 2,093
8 votes
1 answer
301 views

On Julius Caesar and salmon

I saw a TV documentary today which claimed that salmon was named in Latin by Julius Caesar. It was a side remark, but the narrator elaborated that he saw this fish in Gaul and gave it its name due to ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes
2 answers
4k views

How to translate the phrase "perfacile factu esse"?

I'm having a hard time translating this phrase from Caesar's De Bello Gallico. I understand, from doing a bit of research, that probat illis introduces indirect speech. Perfacile factu esse illis ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12k
8 votes
2 answers
531 views

Ambiguities in De Bello Gallico 1.3.3

There are a couple words and phrases which are ambiguous to me in Caesar's De Bello Gallico, 1.3.3. I'll reproduce the text, here, which I got from the Perseus digital library. Ad eas res ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12k
7 votes
1 answer
204 views

What is the difference between emere and coemere?

I was reading Caesar's De Bello Gallico 1.3.1, and I was curious why he used the word coemere when emere also seemed possible; which got me wondering, what exactly is the difference between the two ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12k
6 votes
1 answer
165 views

Is the coordinating conjunction necessary in a parallel series of terms?

I just finished translating line 6 of Bellum Gallicum, Book I Ch. I, and the absence of a coordinating conjunction at the end made me wonder. Belgae ab extremis Galliae finibus oriuntur, pertinent ad ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12k
3 votes
1 answer
453 views

What are some great passages from Caesar?

I'm interested in reading some passages from Julius Caesar, so that I can practice my Latin and get a better sense of classical prose. I don't have time to read the entire Bellum Gallicum or Bellum ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12k
8 votes
1 answer
172 views

Are Iulus and Iulius related?

Is there an etymological (and hence historical) relation between Aeneas's son Iulus and Iulius Caesar? Virgil was obviously trying to establish a conexion of blood, be it mythological, between the ...
Cerberus's user avatar
  • 20k
14 votes
2 answers
250 views

When did Caesar's works begin to be used to teach Latin to non-native speakers?

Eleanor Dickey, a professor of Classics, responded recently to a question about the works read by those learning Latin as a second language in the Greek-speaking ancient world: [Students in the ...
Nathaniel is protesting's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
285 views

Why are *De Bello Africo* and *Hispaniensi* not believed to have been written by Julius Caesar or Hirtius?

De Bello Africo and De Bello Hispaniensi are the two final entries in the series of military commentaries initiated by Julius Caesar's De Bello Gallico. However, according to Wikipedia, neither ...
Nathaniel is protesting's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
2k views

"Et tu, Brute?"

"Et tu, Brute?" Julius Caesar's last words; according to William Shakespeare's play of the same name. There seems to be a difference of opinion regarding the exact translation and thus, too, ...
voices's user avatar
  • 441