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Questions tagged [french]

For questions related to French. Questions solely about French are off-topic, but relations between French and Latin are on-topic.

5
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1answer
50 views

What is the equivalent of “Making someone feel he is indebted” in Greek?

There is a behavior that can arise when one does a favor for another person and after proceeds to put that person in a position they owe them something. Not to conflate in the "debt" or "indebtedness"...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

What semantic notions underlie 'hole' and a swelling, bulge'? [closed]

The English version of Wiktionary's page on 'trou' (French for 'hole') avers that it's: From Medieval Latin traugus, a "barbarous" Latin word first attested in the Ripuarian Law, probably related ...
7
votes
1answer
72 views

Did 'apricus' undergo antiphrasis?

Etymology [ of (French verb) 'abrier' ] From Middle French, from Old French abrier (“to cover”), itself mostly likely from Late Latin aprīcāre, from Latin aprīcārī, present active infinitive ...
4
votes
1answer
90 views

Is urgolius a Latin word, as this Wiktionnaire etymology seems to imply?

I was reading about the French word orgueil recently, and I learned that it derives from the Frankish word *urgōl. (980, Passion), orgolz, puis (1080, Chanson de Roland) orgoill et (1130, Eneas) ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

What semantic notions underlie <the same> (in *metipsimus) and <even> (in 'même')?

[ Wiktionary for 'même' :] Etymology [3.] From Middle French mesme, from Old French mesme, earlier meïsme, [2.] from Vulgar Latin *metipsimus [= the same], [1.] from Latin -met [emphatic suffix] ...
9
votes
1answer
96 views

How did the Latin past participle suffix -atus develop into modern French -é?

How did the Latin past participle suffix -atus develop into modern French -é? Considering the two following examples: modern French état ("state; status") and été ("been"). Both derives ultimately ...
4
votes
0answers
119 views

Why would 'quamquam' have been employed in school debates?

Wiktionary in English lacking information on etymology, I must cite the French version of the French verb 'cancan', but omit the other impertinent etymology hypotheses: (Bavardage) (1821) [3.] ...
12
votes
3answers
661 views

En Marche ! in Latin

Macron's victory in France has got me wondering what would be the best way to capture the phrase "En Marche" in Latin? My first thought was to use the incedere with perhaps prorsus, but the English ...
6
votes
3answers
267 views

When I am the subject and the direct object of a phrase

I want to translate the following French quote from Paul Valéry: Je ne suis pas toujours d'accord avec moi-même. Which roughly translates into: I don't always agree with myself. I want it to ...
4
votes
1answer
135 views

What semantic notions underlie the Latin 'tropus' with the notion of <find>?

Reading the etymology of 'contrive' elicited the entitled question, where I lazily omit some links. My conjecture: A figure of speech had to be found or imagined from the literal meaning, before it ...
13
votes
4answers
1k views

French and Latin “s'il te/vous plaît”

The phrases si tibi placet and si vobis placet can be found in Latin literature, but they are not particularly common. At least superficially they correspond to the French "s'il te plaît" and "s'il ...
1
vote
2answers
67 views

What semantic notions underlie the Latin 'quartus' & the French « écarter »?

[ CNRTL : ] Empr.[unt] au lat[in] *exquartare, dér.[ivé] du lat[in] class[ique] quartus « quart ». Wiktionary states the same etymology: how does the Numeral Adjective 4 in Latin semantically ...
4
votes
1answer
102 views

What is the Latin etymon of 'que' in the French « ne … que »?

I am still trying to understand the etymology of the French adverbial 'ne que', and so researched the Latin etymons of these two Functional Morphemes for more sapience. This question concerns only the ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

What underlying semantic notions connect the Latin for '(from then) to this hour' to the French « encore »?

[ CNRTL : ] Du lat[in] vulg[aire] *hinc ha (c) hora ou *hinc ad horam; la forme a[ncienne] fr[ançaise] uncore, oncore est due à l'infl[uence] de onque, onc*. This thread redirects you to the ...
11
votes
2answers
481 views

How does the Latin of these two translations of The Little Prince compare?

There are two translations of The Little Prince into Latin, one by Auguste Haury and one by Franz Schlosser. I'm trying to get a sense of the relative merits of their Latin. Here's the dedication of ...
2
votes
0answers
36 views

What underlying semantic notions connect 'studere' to 'to put in, put aside, spare, keep'?

[ Etymonline on 'etui (n.)' : ] 1610s, also ettuy, etwee from French étui, Old French estui (12c.) "case, box, container," back-formation from estuier "put in put aside, spare; to keep, shut up, ...
-2
votes
1answer
256 views

When and why did Latin mutate into Italian, French and Spanish? [closed]

At which point in history was the language spoken not anymore called Latin but any of the succeeding languages like Italian, French or Spanish? What are the characteristics which made them different ...