Questions tagged [english-to-latin-translation]

For questions about translating English words or phrases into Latin. Bulk translation requests are off-topic.

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Translation of 'thinking' and 'continuously' into Latin (as used in these phrases)

I'm looking for the most "correct" translations of the following related phrases into Latin: (1) 'Thinking on it continuously' (2) 'Thinking continuously' (3) 'By thinking on it continuously'...
user14798's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
58 views

Excelsior Luminis - Making sure this translation is accurate

Higher than light is what we are trying to get across basically just trying to make sure we say and spell it in a way that makes sense for a motto/ description motto
General's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
89 views

Does Latin have sentences or just clauses?

When I learnt about the pronoun "suus", I was originally taught that it always referred to the subject at the start of the sentence. Having read some original Livy, I am not confused as I ...
Joyce Morley's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
175 views

How do I say ''Don't do things halfway.'' in Latin?

I need to know how to say''Don't do things halfway.'' in Latin? Thank you!
Sander's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
46 views

"One" as pronoun in Latin? [duplicate]

How can we express the pronoun "one" in Latin when it's impersonal or indefinite? Any example: "what's your house? The white one" I know that we can use "is qui" when way ...
Antônio Silva's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
71 views

What is the correct translation for "For posterity"

The context is: A personal family motto that means that whatever is done, the family would always do things for the future family members who are not yet born. Like what Tywin Lannister said to Jamie; ...
gitahi's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
95 views

Mechanical heart in Latin

What would be the correct translation of "mechanical heart" as in sense of a core, something thanks to what a system runs? I was told "cor mechanicum", but I'd like to double-check ...
Kate's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
146 views

How to say "bribe" in Latin?

How does one say "bribe" (noun or verb) in Latin? In Italian, it is tangente, from the Latin tangentem ("touched"). The Lexicon Recentis Latinitatis says tangente (🇮🇹) means ...
Geremia's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
76 views

Translate: “If God Is For Me.”

If God is for us, who can be against us?” - Romans 8:31 Looking to translate, “If God is for me.” from English to Latin.
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-1 votes
0 answers
81 views

How would you say "a body needs to receive energy from some other body"?

In my Reddit post about gun control in Latin, I paraphrased the Second Law of Thermodynamics like this: Per secundam legem thermodynamicae, corpus, ut possit laborem facere, debet energiam accipere ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
70 views

Check my Latin: Note on Ovid’s use of the name Appias. (A fountain, a nymph, and a bunch of lawyers.)

Ovid uses the words Appias or Appiades on three occasions (Ars Amatoria 1.79-88 and 3.447-452; Remedia Amoris 659-660) to refer jokingly to the legal business conducted in the Forum of Julius Caesar. ...
Patricius's user avatar
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To Keep One's Thoughts to Oneself

At the end of episode 16 of "The World at War" (ITV, 1973) there is newsreel footage, from October 1944, showing Goebbels addressing the newly-formed Volksturm: old men; veterans of the ...
tony's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
129 views

Translate, “The world with her” into Latin

English and Latin translation for a question that I can’t seem to answer definitively. I’m thinking I want this as a tattoo, to go along with a compass. My wife IS my whole world, but also we travel ...
user14695's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
30 views

Trying to translate "Mastery Through Hardwork"

I have looked at the following, i'm interested if there is something closer. "per ardua ad peritiam" -> "through the arduous to the skill." "dominium in labore" -> &...
Glenn's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
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Adapting Maine's Dirigo motto to say something like "I lead the bored"

“Dirigo” is the Maine state motto. It’s generally translated as “I lead”. Well, I’ve got a chance to name a bit of land here and I want it's motto to be in Latin and to express something like “I lead ...
Dustin's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
955 views

What would the correct Latin term be for 'most wise robot' or 'very wise android'?

I'm working on a plot for a sequel to my children's musical Granny Galactica. It will be a 'grown-up' sequel set 40 years after the first one, and will include a character called Nettlebot - a robot ...
David Haines's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
337 views

Why would an accusative become the subject in Tacitus, Annales 1.28?

I am translating Tacitus's Annales 1.28 and the first line is "noctem minacem et in scelus erupturam fors leniuit: ..." When looking at other people's translation they have said "The ...
Pip's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
111 views

Conjugate dīrígere as 1st-person past tense

How might I say dīrígere — which is conjugated dirigo, I think, in first person present tense, to first person past tense? Perfect, imperfect, I’d like to know them both.
Dustin's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
29 views

How to say "relation" (as in diplomatic relation between parties)

How to term the connection between two entitles whether between countries or between individuals. How to say something like: "The relation between the brothers were once tense, but now they are ...
d_e's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
114 views

How would you say "familiar foreign land" in Latin?

I am trying to translate the lyrics of the Eric Bogle's song "The Gift of Years" into Latin. In the second stanza, there are verses: And for the last time here I stand,in this familiar ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
-1 votes
3 answers
236 views

How would you say "go" as in "Go tell that to the people who survived Vukovar!" in Latin?

I was wondering, how would you say "Go tell that to the people who survived Vukovar!" in Latin? Specifically, how would you translate the word "go" at the beginning of the sentence?...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
139 views

Would like help with Tattoo wording: "forever in my arms"

I have tried to translate "Forever in my arms" and came up with "Semper in Armes" would this be correct?
Stephen's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
155 views

"To sound (like)" in Latin

The verb sound in English sometimes acts copulative. The definition of this sense in Merriam–Webster's dictionary is to make or convey an impression especially when heard // it sounds good to me // ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
88 views

Latin for "death to freedom"?

Is "mortem libertatem" correct? Or "Ad libertatem per mortem"? Or "Mortem via ad libertatem"? the idea is that through death freedom arises or guarantees
Giu's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
439 views

Is Ars Boni Cantus a good construction?

I'm trying to create a tag line for a product in Latin and want it to be correct. Goals: should form the acronym ABC. Bonus points for suggestions that create ABCD. I'm going for something along the ...
Joseph's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
55 views

How to call someone a disgrace or mistake?

How would you call someone a mistake and/or a disgrace in Latin? long story short: I’m writing something and in this specific instance a character is being condemned, ridiculed and planned to be ...
user14517's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
371 views

Is there a way to say the English phrase "Get it over with" in Latin?

Like if an activity is unpleasant to do, but someone must or wants to do it anyway, someone in English might say something along the lines of "Let's get this over with", or if a person is ...
Nomad1004's user avatar
  • 315
3 votes
2 answers
262 views

How to say "I know a little Latin" in Latin

I would like to translate the following sentence into Latin: I know a little Latin Here is my attempt: Ego parva lingva latina I don't know if that is right. Can someone suggest a better ...
historylover's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is "nati sumus ut nutricati veritate" a grammatically correct Latin sentence to express "we born to be fed by truth"?

Is "nati sumus ut nutricati veritate" a grammatically correct sentence in Latin language and does it express "we born to be fed by truth" or in a way "we born to be nourished ...
Rick Feed's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
297 views

How to say 'I miss you' in Latin

How can I say "I miss you" in the sense that one misses someone and desires to be again with this someone nonetheless it is alive or death? My dicctionary only list: miror, which is more ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
29 views

latin translation for "encrypted message" [duplicate]

How did Caesar say "encrypted message"? Looking at the latin translations for kruptós increases the number of options: hidden, concealed, private, secret. But that's as far as I can go in ...
user237419's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
160 views

Novo v. Novus v. Novum for demonym

What would be the correct or most appropriate demonym for someone who was from New Spain? I have seen “Nova Hispania” used for New Spain in some 17century maps but wikipedia also uses “Viceregnum ...
HispanusHorribilis's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
242 views

Reimagining the logical gates in Latin

Boolean logic has logical gates which have the following truth tables: NON gate: Input Output 0 1 1 0 AND gate: Input A Input B Output 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 NAND gate: Input A Input B ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
132 views

Modalities for fictitious past: could have, should have, and would have

In English, the pattern [could/should/would + have done] is used for fictional expressions contrary to the fact, e.g. You could have done your work yesterday (but you have not). How to express such ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
76 views

How to say "bookish" (adj.) in Latin?

How does one say "bookish" adj. (in the sense of possessing speculative but lacking practical reason or social skills) in Latin?
Geremia's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
100 views

Translation for "You'll Shoot Your Eye Out"?

The low-budget but classic movie, A Christmas Story (1983) is famous for the line "You'll shoot your eye out!", which is said by everyone when nine year old Ralphie says wants a Red Rider® ...
Ray Butterworth's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
273 views

How would you translate the infinitive "to write" as in "There will still be music left to write."?

The song "The Longest Time" by Billy Joel begins with: If you said goodbye to me tonight, there would still be music left to write. How would you say that in Latin? What kind of infinitive ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
863 views

How would you translate "Nothing but the rain"?

In the science fiction TV show Battlestar Galactica, two characters share the following greeting on occasion: What do you hear? Nothing but the rain. I've been wondering what would be the closest ...
matias's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
62 views

What is a translation of "All can be given, all can be taken" to assist with a tattoo design. Thank you!

Just as the title says, seeking a possible translation to the phrase. Any and all help is appreciated and thank you to those who are linguistically talented unlike myself! Yall take care!
Andy's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
45 views

How to say "Game Changer" in Latin

How can we describe the disruptive influence of a new factor/invention/information to a sphere of life? as the English idiom "game changer"? In particular, it would be great to have a ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11k
1 vote
1 answer
163 views

"I am on imperial business and may not be interfered with..."

In the TV-series, "I Claudius" (BBC, 1976), episode 6, Drusus (Son of Emperor Tiberius, nicknamed, "Castor") stops a prefect, in the street, who was arresting one of his friends. ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,498
4 votes
2 answers
473 views

How would you say "unlike" as the conjunction in Latin?

For instance, how would one say "Unlike the physicians, Christian Scientists are not afraid to take the medication they prescribe to their patients by themselves." in Latin? In Croatian, you ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
130 views

Use of subjunctive in translation of movie quote

I want to translate the phrase rise and rise again until lambs become lions into Llatin, with the idea of never giving up or daring to the impossible. My translation so far is surge et surge ad ...
graograman's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
120 views

Lanius non laneo. Evolution

I am trying to do the evolution from Classical Latin to Vulgar Latin of this word: Lanius non laneo. Could someone help me? What are the changes that occur? I was thinking of a diphthongation but I'm ...
Anna's user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
2 answers
103 views

How can I say “Natural Selection” in Latin?

I was wondering what Is the correct way to translate “natural selection” in latin? Is It more correct “naturalis lectio” or “naturalis electio”?
Lkjg67's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
2 answers
321 views

Latin translation for school motto "Growing "Stronger"

Could people suggest a good Latin translation for the school motto "Growing Stronger" Our school name and logo etc are all related to oak trees. Any suggestions would be great, so we can ...
AndyGOSS's user avatar
-2 votes
4 answers
305 views

If the laws of physics no longer apply in the future, god help you

I am trying to translate the phrase If the laws of physics no longer apply in the future, god help you. I have some problems to decide how to translate no longer to Latin*, in Spanish it would be more ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
34 views

Translation of the game hide-and-seek

According to Wikipedia, a kind of hide-and-seek-like games is attested in Ancient Greek as apodidraskinda. Are there attested similar games in Ancient Rome? If not, are there any good options for the ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
68 views

What does Una Excelsior mean?

I'm looking for a good phrase to encapsulate "ever upward, together" and i'd like to use Una, Excelsior Any thoughts or other suggestions?
theLeo's user avatar
  • 21
7 votes
3 answers
3k views

Request for translation of Jung's quote to latin for tattoo

I would like to seek help in translating this line from The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Vol. 9, Part II, Chapter V "Christ, a symbol of the self", paragraph 78 (available as a PDF on the ...
Dov's user avatar
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