Questions tagged [english-to-latin-translation]

For questions about translating English words or phrases into Latin. Bulk translation requests are off-topic.

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6
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0answers
90 views

“£30,000? Murders have been committed for a lot less.”

In an old TV-prog. (1950s), "The Annals of Scotland Yard", old cases were dramatised with a narration from distinguished criminologist, the late Edgar Lustgarten. One of these, from the ...
4
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2answers
65 views

How to translate “there are few absolutes”?

In order to translate the sentence "there are few absolutes" into Latin I thought about: res absolutae paucae sunt. I introduced the word res since I did not find a latin substantive that is ...
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2answers
66 views

How to say “Go all the way” in Latin?

I want to know how I can say Go all the way in Latin. What I found is Ut omni modo. Is it correct? I’ll use it to say something like: Go all the way what ever this will cost you, when we are talking ...
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1answer
226 views

What Benefit is Conferred by the Inclusion of a Gerundive in an Ablative-Absolute (AA) Construction?

In his answer to Q: Can Gerundives be predicates of Ablative Absolutes?, Seb offered a number of examples, the second of which: "quo senatus consulto recitato cum [populus] more hoc insulso et ...
6
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2answers
538 views

Translating the title of a thesis about energy storage into Latin

How do I translate the title of my dissertation thesis into Latin? Energy storage: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, Renewable-Hydrogen integration for home usage Here is my best try: Energy praeclusio: ...
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1answer
91 views

How to translated preposition + ing in Latin?

How to translate sentences like "before doing X" in Latin since ante requires an accusative?
4
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2answers
89 views

Is “evidenter” the correct translation for “obviously!”?

I've searched the forum but found no answer to my question. How would one say obviously in Latin? As in answering a question with a "it's option b, obviously!" Online dictionaries have given ...
2
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0answers
61 views

Translating Internet vernacular + 'disorder' into Latin

Newbie to Latin here. I thought it might be amusing to translate web slang into Latin, but this raised a few questions. If the accuracy is lacking, please let me know how! LOLUMADCUZUBAD? Turbati ...
5
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1answer
83 views

Seize your future

What would "Seize your future/the future" be in Latin? I've got Carpe futurum, but my latin is quite poor. I want to use it as a motto for an educational company. I want to use it as it ...
6
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3answers
4k views

How do I say Disney World in Latin?

How do I say Disney World in Latin? I googled it but I’m still not sure. Disney Mundi? Disney Mundum?
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3answers
84 views

What are the best translations of “Take it as it goes” and “go forward in the light/ Ever forward in the light”

For take it as it goes I have this so far "Ut áuferant eam abscedit" or " Accipiant illam" althought I don't know how accurate either is is. For go forward in the light I have &...
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4answers
316 views

Speaking about an inflected word in Latin

In English, it is fairly common to write/say such sentences as the following: What is the possessive case of she? Should I use who or whom after man? What is the past participle of run? These kinds ...
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3answers
22k views

Don't let the bastards grind you down

The intertubes are awash with grammatically incorrect "translations" of the phrase "don't let the bastards grind you down" (please pardon my French :-) Can someone please provide a correct and ...
2
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2answers
95 views

TRANSLATION “In the midst of the darkness, the light persists”

What would be the most correct translation into Latin of the phrase: "In the midst of darkness, the light persists", I have found on some sites: IN MEDIA TENEBRIS LUCEM PERDURAVERIT, but I ...
2
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1answer
118 views

Latin for “Stand upon the heavens” and “Surpass the gods”

How can I translate following sentences to Latin: Stand upon the heavens and Surpass the gods, both having somewhat close and similiar meanings in English. I am looking for something that reflects ...
5
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1answer
64 views

How to talk about a mailing list in latin?

We have (wiki with sources) new latin words for the email service (cursus electronicus or cursus publicus electronicus), a single email (litterae electronicae or electrogramma, -tis n) and email ...
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2answers
110 views

How do you say 'You saying so doesn't make it so' in Latin?

So, how do you say "You saying so doesn't make it so" in Latin? I think it would be a literal translation of Croatian "Tvoje to reći to ne čini", Tuum id dicere id non facit, but I ...
2
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1answer
133 views

What is the right way to translate ''I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul'' in latin?

I have been looking now for a while the right translation of these sentences in latin; I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul. I have found three different answers but not sure which ...
3
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0answers
46 views

Protego Causa in Sanctus and In causa Sanctus

How can I say "I'm in a saint cause"or "a noble cause". Like studying for example, or acquiring knowledge in science is a noble cause, so I can say that I'm pursuing or I'm in the ...
2
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1answer
77 views

Is there a better classical latin translation of don't let the bastards get you down? [duplicate]

Apologies for beating a dead horse but would any of these options grammatically make sense or work for 'don't let the 'jerks' grind you down' as bastard wasn't a thing apparently? I know nothis is an ...
2
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1answer
63 views

Translation Request, English to Latin

How can I translate this sentence to Latin, "Man in the palace! Remember death, live with fear of death. Leave us alone." I translate like that but... I don't know, I guess, I did a mistake. ...
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1answer
56 views

How to render the phrase “to do a reading” in Latin

If I want to say "I do a reading," how would I render that in Latin? "Ago legendum" or "Legere legendum" Can I do it using a participle? "Ago lectionem" Can I ...
7
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1answer
365 views

Why is “Onus” in the Dative Case?

North & Hillard Ex. 211: a general addresses his soldiers as an approaching enemy is about to encircle them. The following is to be translated into Latin: "But since the enemy are already ...
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2answers
92 views

Possible Latin Pun?

There is a quote from G.K. Chesterton in The Philosophy of Islands: “Did you or did you not as a child try to step on every alternate paving-stone ? Was that artificial and a superstition? Did ...
4
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1answer
70 views

Is “semper in animi” be a reasonable translation of always in our minds

Would "semper in animi" be a reasonable translation of always in our minds as in always remembered in a fond, personal sense when thinking about your parents?
9
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1answer
218 views

Sherlockian Logic

In the crime novels by Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle, central character, detective, Sherlock Holmes described his approach to evidence-analysis as the discarding of the impossible; then, whatever remains, ...
3
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1answer
323 views

'His studies' in Latin

The full sentence is 'Quintus no longer enjoyed his studies,' and I've translated it as 'Quintus non longior gaudebat studiorum.' Should 'studiorum' be genitive since it expresses possession?
5
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4answers
311 views

“lovesick” = ? in Latin

How does one say "lovesick" in Latin? It's "malato d'amore" in Italian. Is it "malus amoris"? Or would that mean more "malicious love"?
5
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1answer
254 views

Looking for a proper translation of “life is deaf”

What I want to do I'm trying to create a statement that essentially is describing life as being deaf. Roughly in english this would be "life is deaf". The problem is that I'm trying to ...
2
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1answer
156 views

Always in the shit; only the depth changes

I came across this humorous Latin phrase on social media, rendered as: Sumus semper in excretum, sed alta variat ...but when I searched it, I realised there was a more common rendering of it: ...
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2answers
169 views

Latin translation of “hope for the best, prepare for the worst”

I'm looking in translating this text (in classical Latin rather than contemporary): Hope for the best Prepare for the worst Expect the unexpected (or alternatively "Plan for the worst") ...
6
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1answer
292 views

“Middle constructions” in Latin?

I was wondering how so-called "middle constructions" like the English ones exemplified in (1), which are typically translated with a reflexive verb in Romance languages (e.g., see the Catalan examples ...
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2answers
104 views

How should the phrase “in question” be translated into Latin?

I want to translate the phrase "in question" into Latin, as in: Please deposit the car keys next to the car in question, and then leave by the main door. How would I express this?
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2answers
348 views

Trying to translate 'Blood promises glory'

I'm trying to translate 'blood promises glory' into Latin. Google translate provided me with Sanguinis Promissa Gloria and I like it, sounds good, but I really want to run it past someone who actually ...
6
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1answer
118 views

UPDATE: How to translate “Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable?”

I am trying to translate the saying "Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable" into Latin, but I don't actually know Latin, and I've run into a wall. I think the verbs should be ...
7
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1answer
857 views

Meaning of “quod si”

I'm having trouble with quod sī. L&S offers, under the definition of quod, With other particles, as si, nisi, utinam, ubi, etc., always with reference to something which precedes (very freq.), ...
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1answer
54 views

Is this correct Latin, substitution in an epigram?

I have never taken Latin, but I enjoy languages, and particularly pithy quotes. There is a legal principle De minimis non curat lex, which is usually translated as “the law is not concerned with ...
4
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1answer
100 views

How to say “Get well soon!”?

Salvete! My friend who loves Latin is sick and I want to tell him "Get well soon!" in Latin. Is sanesco the right verb to use here? Should I use the present or the future imperative (mox ...
3
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3answers
162 views

What would be the correct translation, to the latin, for this phrase: “The blood of the One who is the Rock of our salvation”

What would be the correct translation, to the Latin, for this phrase: "The blood of the One who is the Rock of our salvation". This is a Christian phrase that will be put on a seal. I have ...
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0answers
30 views

“Life decreed better!” in Latin

Sort of, related to my another qestion. I am looking for mo secular (for the lack of a better word) version of a phrase "Di melius!". While I know that deus could be interpreted as "...
1
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2answers
114 views

Translate “I am the storm”

Can someone please help translate this "I am the storm". The context is “The devil whispered in my ear, ‘You’re not strong enough to withstand the storm.’ Today I whispered in the devil’s ...
4
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4answers
672 views

Translate “Eat, Drink, and be merry” to Latin

In the spirit of the holidays, I was thinking about how you would say Eat! Drink! Be Merry! in Latin (or written as Eat, drink, and be merry!). There are multiple words for each, but I'm not sure ...
5
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2answers
133 views

How would one say “Please let me do X thing”

Was wondering how one would say "Please let me do X thing" e.g. "Please let me love/win/see" Would you use some sort of impersonal construction, or would one use "permitto&...
4
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1answer
125 views

translation for Strength, love and courage to Latin

I would like to engrave a piece in Latin for my teenage son with our “family motto.” The motto is strength, love and courage. He is studying Latin and I want to be sure the word choice is accurate. ...
12
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1answer
15k views

A correct latin translation of “By the power of truth, I, a mortal, have conquered the universe”

If you've read the V for Vendetta comics you may remember the quote "Vi veri vniversum vivus vici", which is supposed to mean "By the power of truth, I, a mortal [/ while living], have conquered the ...
4
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1answer
93 views

Always Cats in Latin

I know that "semper fidelis" means something like "always faithful". I want to make a little joke by saying something similar to "semper fidelis" but to mean something ...
8
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2answers
740 views

Latin translation of “don't get caught”

I am looking for a translation of "don't get caught". This phrase is the slogan of World Chase Tag (a tag competition), and it seems like they tried to put a Latin translation on their ...
3
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1answer
86 views

Legendum excolit mundum

I am trying to translate "Reading improves the world" to Latin. My translation is: Legendum excolit mundum. Is this a good translation? I can't understand if I should use legendum or ...
5
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2answers
333 views

Translate “The World has lost its way” into Latin

I am translating the phrase the world has lost its way into Latin. I currently have the following: Mundus modum suum amittit Or as an alternative: Mundus conversationem suum amittit I'm very open ...
3
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1answer
68 views

A Stack Exchange equivalent of Caveat Emptor

I've been trying to use Google Translate to create a version of "Caveat Emptor" (Buyer Beware or Let the Buyer Beware) that reflects the idea of Let the answerer beware Let the respondent ...

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