Questions tagged [english-to-latin-translation]

For questions about translating English words or phrases into Latin. Bulk translation requests are off-topic.

115 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
7 votes
0 answers
122 views

Don't pay the ferryman, until ... future perfect?

Recently I read that Charon was a portitor, i.e., a ferryman. This got me thinking about the phrase "Don't pay the ferryman until he gets you to the other side" (Chris de Burgh, 1982) and ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
85 views

How do I say "typeface" in Latin?

How do I say "typeface" (that is "font family") in Latin? The Wikipedia page is translated under the title "Typus" but there is a banner saying "Latinitas huius rei ...
user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
165 views

A translation into Latin of the very common English idiom ‘just in case’

This common English idiom means that you are doing something ‘just in case’ and refers vaguely to the possibility that a thing might happen or be true, without saying exactly what it is but that you ...
Jonathan Hadfield's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
74 views

To Keep One's Thoughts to Oneself

At the end of episode 16 of "The World at War" (ITV, 1973) there is newsreel footage, from October 1944, showing Goebbels addressing the newly-formed Volksturm: old men; veterans of the ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,498
5 votes
0 answers
37 views

Is the construction "a desiderando amari" correct in Latin?

In a previous question in this forum I asked how could "the desire of being loved" (as in the prayer "From the desire of being loved, deliver me, Lord"), and similar constructions, ...
Juan G. C.'s user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
115 views

Classical Translation for "aura, vibrations, feeling"

I have struggled in finding an adequate translation for the above mentioned words, that designate the subtle ambiance that something is thought to emit or convey. Like "she gives me negative ...
Ruh Muhaccer's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
66 views

Can There Be Multiple Subjects in a Clause Where One Is the Subject of Another Clause

I want to construct "I like learning, but learning from a book only can be boring": "Discere amo, sed discere a libro ipso sit taediosum." I was wondering if you can omit "...
James's user avatar
  • 51
5 votes
0 answers
102 views

Well, well, well

How to say this expression in Latin!? Expressing surprise: Well, well, well! It is here (when smth lost and found)! Expressing sarcasm: Well, well, well... And what now!? Expressing begining: Well, ...
TrmIntrs2's user avatar
  • 329
5 votes
0 answers
918 views

Latin term for "false equivalence" fallacy?

I'm looking for a way to talk in Latin about the "blame on both sides" rhetoric with respect to the recent events in Charlottesville. Is there a Latin term for the fallacy of false equivalence? It ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.4k
5 votes
0 answers
119 views

How to say "Double negation affirms by accident"?

I want to know how to say, "Double negation affirms by accident" or "Double negation affirms accidentally." Would it be duplex negatio affirmat per accidens? This is in reference to the idea from ...
אהרן רובין's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
304 views

Translation for "adventure"

One of the meanings of the word adventure is "exciting or remarkable experience", e.g. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland They were looking for adventure. Working with children can be a ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
248 views

How to say "in the first place (After a Mistake)" in Latin?

In English, the expression, "in the first place", is used (not exclusively but) when things have gone wrong and it's clear that something should have been done differently, at the incipient ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,498
4 votes
0 answers
29 views

How to say "relation" (as in diplomatic relation between parties)

How to term the connection between two entitles whether between countries or between individuals. How to say something like: "The relation between the brothers were once tense, but now they are ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11k
4 votes
0 answers
34 views

Translation of the game hide-and-seek

According to Wikipedia, a kind of hide-and-seek-like games is attested in Ancient Greek as apodidraskinda. Are there attested similar games in Ancient Rome? If not, are there any good options for the ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
74 views

Translation of "Only human"? As in he/she is only human, and we need to remember that?

As the title says. Thank you, wise men and women.
Søren Hansen's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
316 views

How to say "welcome to" in latin?

I've seen the questions and answers about "welcome", and I haven't seen anything about "Welcome to". Then I decided to search on the OLD, and I saw the adjective "acceptus&...
user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
67 views

Best translation - "Live Deliberately" - vive de industria? vive deliberate? vive consilium?

What would the best translation of "Live Deliberately" be as a motto? I'm thinking of a few different phrases: vive de industria? vive deliberate? vive consilium? Not sure what is best. ...
Bad Pockett's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
32 views

A skeleton in the cupboard/ closet

Is there an equivalent phrase in Latin that readily springs to mind of any colleague, meaning ‘a shameful secret known only to family members’? I know you could say res turpis intra familiam condita ...
Jonathan Hadfield's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
141 views

What is the Latin for good/ bad vibes?

Clearly this word ‘vibes’ is colloquial, if not slang. My first attempts were to modify a phrase from Plautus for ‘good vibes’ viz. ab initio inter nos congrūimus concorditer and from Cicero for ‘bad ...
Jonathan Hadfield's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
60 views

What Might Roman Soldiers Have Called the Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress?

Following on from Q: How Would Post-Traumatic Stress be Expressed in (Contemporary) Latin? and given the entirely fair assumption that PTSD has bedevilled warriors since the inception of warfare, what ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,498
4 votes
0 answers
103 views

Estne hoc translatio correcta?

my name is Diego and this is my very first post. I am a big fan of Avicii. I am also a beginner in Latin and was wondering if anyone could help me out checking the translation I've put together of a ...
Diego Ojeda's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
78 views

Need help writing a reminder to myself in latin. - out of curiosity, knowledge. out of life, wisdom

This is what I want to remind myself everyday (probably tattoo it someday too): out of curiosity, knowledge. out of life, wisdom. Is this how I’d write it? ex curiositate, scientia ex vita, ...
Jason Braganza's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
170 views

Fearing the Evolution of Coronavirus

As governments dread the evolution of a Coronavirus-variant that will not be susceptible to the new wave of vaccines, how would this fear be expressed in Latin? The Romans, with no concept of ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,498
4 votes
0 answers
178 views

World War One: Opening Moves

On Q "We Are Triumphant While Our enemy Sleeps" the comment was made: "Remember the Schlieffen Plan? Brilliant; inspired gamble; but, it could have only have worked if the belligerent nations had ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,498
4 votes
0 answers
436 views

Seeking simple Latin translation for motto "fire, flow, transcendence"

I am in a community of flow artists and fire performers. I'm putting together a "coat of arms" of sorts for this community, and would like to include a motto in Latin. The motto in English would be ...
Matt Storer's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
49 views

Adapting Maine's Dirigo motto to say something like "I lead the bored"

“Dirigo” is the Maine state motto. It’s generally translated as “I lead”. Well, I’ve got a chance to name a bit of land here and I want it's motto to be in Latin and to express something like “I lead ...
Dustin's user avatar
  • 41
3 votes
0 answers
100 views

Translation for "You'll Shoot Your Eye Out"?

The low-budget but classic movie, A Christmas Story (1983) is famous for the line "You'll shoot your eye out!", which is said by everyone when nine year old Ralphie says wants a Red Rider® ...
Ray Butterworth's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
110 views

To get over a trauma OR just learn to live with it

Are there Latin idioms for getting over a trauma and/ or learning to live with one? Here's a made-up sentence: A widow said that it had taken her a year to get over the death of her husband; or, not ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,498
3 votes
0 answers
64 views

Can "ultra vires" mean "without authorization"?

The legal term ultra virēs literally means "beyond their powers"; it refers to, say, a government official trying to make a law they don't have the authority to make (making that law is &...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66k
3 votes
1 answer
122 views

Championship = "Pilae" but Pilae = ball, pillar, etc

I'm looking for the Latin word for the English word/concept of "Championship" which Google and many google results indicate is "Pilae", but when I do the reverse to see what Pilae ...
oucil's user avatar
  • 131
3 votes
0 answers
111 views

The obligations of the knight

I was studying the order of knights os St. John and found the 8 obligations or aspirations of a Knight, they are: to live in truth to have faith repent one's sins give proof of humility love justice ...
KromeWing's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
61 views

Feedback on my Translation of Yeats into Latin

I'm looking for feedback on my rendition of W.B. Yeats' poem Who Goes with Fergus? (1893). Comments, corrections, emendations and suggestions are all welcome. Here's the original poem: Who will go ...
Patricius's user avatar
  • 361
3 votes
0 answers
261 views

What is a correct English-to-(Medieval?) Latin translation of the Grail Tablet in "Indiana Jones & the Last Crusade"?

This is my first, and probably only, question on here (I usually hang out on SciFi/Fantasy), so I apologize if I've done it incorrectly or if it's not considered on-topic, but I've wanted to know for ...
SpaceWolf1701's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
149 views

Yes, sir, no siir, three bags full sir

Is there a Latin expression which is used by someone who sarcastically or semi-humorously pretends to be completely subservient and complies with everything that is asked of him (without even ...
Jonathan Hadfield's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
34 views

bouncy castle (for children to jump and play on)

I have been asked by the child of a neighbour to translate this into Latin. I am finding it difficult apart from the fact that Latin doesn’t seem to have a good word for ‘bouncy’ apart from ‘salio’ ...
Jonathan Hadfield's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
228 views

Common latin phrase for "and the opposite case too"

I recall once seeing in some notes (not for Latin) which contained a Latin phrase - I can't recall the exact definition but contextually I knew it meant something along the lines of "and the ...
TheAnonymous's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
150 views

How Would Post-Traumatic Stress be Expressed in (Contemporary) Latin?

While researching the possibility of the occurrence of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), in the Roman army, I found this article from Historia magazine: "Did Roman Soldiers Suffer PTSD?"...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,498
3 votes
0 answers
206 views

How do you say 'daily schedule or routine' in Latin

My resource for checking whether or not a word is attested in Latin is packhum. I have seen three proposals for how to translate this word: 'schedula', 'defunctarius', and 'horarium' but none of ...
bobsmith76's user avatar
  • 2,269
3 votes
0 answers
66 views

How do you say "ludic cosmology" in latin?

is it cosmologia ludica? is that the correct spelling? i'm getting a lot of discrepancy here from scholars. so there are two words that require translation. cosmos and ludic. i'm assuming both have ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes
0 answers
93 views

translate motto into Latin

How would you translate this motto into Latin: “near side or off side, but always centered”. This refers to the side a lady rides on her horse in a side saddle: near side is with both legs on the left ...
Lien's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes
0 answers
138 views

What is "Ripa autem erat munita acutis sudibus sub aqua fixis ut sudes flumine tegerentur" in English?

Right now, I have: Ripa autem erat munita acutis sudibus sub aqua fixis ut sudes flumine tegerentur But he had been protecting a sharp spear underwater" I don't know how to do the rest.
user9689's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
228 views

Protego Causa in Sanctus and In causa Sanctus

How can I say "I'm in a saint cause"or "a noble cause". Like studying for example, or acquiring knowledge in science is a noble cause, so I can say that I'm pursuing or I'm in the ...
Hamdiken's user avatar
  • 181
3 votes
0 answers
37 views

Saying "dissident" in the sense of political noncompliance

The definition of the word "dissidens" doesn't mention anything about political activism. What would be the way to denote someone who is a political dissident, like Noam Chomsky?
Beliod's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes
0 answers
430 views

What fresh hell is this?

“What fresh hell is this?” is a question frequently uttered (or so it has been reported) by writer Dorothy Parker, on such occasions as when the doorbell or the telephone rang, expressing her ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
77 views

What is a "camarilla" in Latin?

The Spanish word camarilla means a group of conspirators meeting in secret to manipulate the political leadership. It's been borrowed into English, as well as quite a few other Romance languages, ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66k
3 votes
0 answers
179 views

'War is hell' in Latin

Some ideas I have come up with are:- bellum est infandum war is an abomination inmite est bellum war is pitiless res cruenta et infanda est Mars War is a blood-soaked atrocity Mars furit infandus War ...
Jonathan Hadfield's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
139 views

Climate Change--Revised

Firstly, thanks to brianpck, Joonas, cnread & Quidam for their intervention and many helpful suggestions on the restructuring of this Q. Climate change (CC)/ Global Warming (GW)--phrases that ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,498
3 votes
0 answers
110 views

Super specie nihil?

Help! There are the well-known terms sub specie dei, sub specie aeternitatis (Spinoza?). I want to know: how would one correctly write super specie nihil, meaning not "below", from the (above) view of ...
Stephen Lapeyrouse's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
165 views

"Laughing our heads off" in Latin

As a follow-up of an interesting question on a typological classification of Latin (Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed or verb-framed? ), I was wondering if Latin has (semi)idiomatic ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,501
2 votes
0 answers
70 views

Check my Latin: Note on Ovid’s use of the name Appias. (A fountain, a nymph, and a bunch of lawyers.)

Ovid uses the words Appias or Appiades on three occasions (Ars Amatoria 1.79-88 and 3.447-452; Remedia Amoris 659-660) to refer jokingly to the legal business conducted in the Forum of Julius Caesar. ...
Patricius's user avatar
  • 361