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Questions tagged [ecclesiastical-latin]

This tag is used for questions concerning the liturgical and codified language of the church from the end of antiquity until today.

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the pronunciation of _excelsis_ in Ecclesiastical Latin

In another post about the de-facto standard use of Ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation in singing, I included a postscript querying whether excelsis should be pronounced [ɛksʧɛlsis] or [ɛkʃɛlsis]. ...
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Is *digne* an adverb in the “Munda cor meum” prayer?

Below is one of the prayers which the priest says before reading the Gospel in the Tridentine Mass. Munda cor meum, ac labia mea, omnípotens Deus, qui labia Isaíæ Prophétæ cálculo mundásti igníto: ...
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1answer
105 views

How to better distinguish words in Gregorian Chant?

When listening to Gregorian Chant (in Latin), I find very hard to distinguish the words being sung, beyond some trivial regular words or phrases. It might well be said that Gregorian Chant is ...
8
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1answer
150 views

What would a 5th-6th century learned Latin pronunciation have sounded like?

Is there any information on the status of learned pronunciations from the late imperial period up to 1000 CE? I am wondering because the Classical Latin reconstruction seems to make clear that by the ...
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How would I talk about supernatural “possession”?

Many stories, both ancient and modern, concern "possession": a supernatural entity of some sort takes over a human or animal body and controls it. Is there a Classical Latin word for this phenomenon? ...
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138 views

How would I say “fallen” in a Christian sense?

Suppose I want to talk about "fallen angels": angels who (according to some Abrahamic sects) rebelled against God and were cast out of Heaven. What would be the appropriate word for this? I'm not ...
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1answer
60 views

How do I find uses of a word in Ecclesiastical Latin?

If I want to find a citation for a word in Classical(-ish) Latin, I might go to the Packhum Corpus, put in the stem, and weed through any spurious results. But suppose I want to know how (or if) a ...
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78 views

Translating: “Christ Jesus Ultimate King & Ruler for All Time”

I have considered that this may be stated: "Christī Regēns", emphasising with a capital R and being pronounced actively ruling. Is this sufficient to state? I wonder that is is not more like, "...
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1answer
47 views

Is “nolī esse” grammatical?

In the Vatican's Nova Vulgata, Ecclesiastes 7:16-17 reads as follows: Noli esse nimis iustus neque sapiens supra modum! Cur te perdere vis? Ne agas nimis impie et noli esse stultus! Cur ...
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How to say “please pray for me” in ecclesiastical latin?

I know that ora pro me means "pray for me", but how would I express my request politely, such as in the English equivalent "Please pray for me" ?
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I would like to translate an english curse into proper latin

I would like to translate this english curse into latin. "Whoever takes my freedom will burn in hell forever."
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171 views

Church Latin: when did the orthography change occur?

Sometime around the middle of the 20th century the Latin orthography of official Roman Catholic liturgical books of the Roman Rite switched from "juxta", "Jesus", "Judaei" etc. to "iuxta", "Iesus", "...
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Dust to Dust, Ashes to Ashes

The famous phrase "Dust to Dust, Ashes to Ashes" does not come from the Bible but from the English Burial Service of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, reading: "we therefore commit his body to the ...
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3answers
149 views

(Latin) Set apart for God

The Vulgate Romans 1:1 reads Paulus servus Christi Iesu vocatus apostolus segregatus in evangelium Dei Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle and set apart for the gospel of ...
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323 views

Can “gēns” be used to exclude outsiders, as in English “Gentile”?

I'm examining a work by Tertullian, Adversus Iudaeos, and in it he uses the word "gentibus" in a way that seems to indicate peoples or nations: Hunc enim oportebat pro omnibus gentibus fieri ...
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A Dios rogando y con el mazo dando

tl;dr I want a Latin motto conveying the idea that you have to ask God for something while at the same time pursuing it. I have two Spanish sayings that work pretty well I have a couple of Latin ...
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3answers
146 views

Was “dominus” or similar used with a title?

If a person is addressed formally with a title, it seems to vary from language to language (and to some extent within a single language) whether a word like "Mr" or "Herr" (German) is used. In Finnish ...
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Why not “Agne Dei”?

Here's a sentence from the Catholic Mass: Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis. Why not agne? Shouldn't agnus be in the vocative? Note tollis and miserere in the second person. ...
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581 views

Understanding “conceptus est de Spiritu Sancto”

The Apostles' Creed contains this passage: qui conceptus est de Spiritu Sancto, natus ex Maria Virgine, passus sub Pontio Pilato, crucifixus, mortuus, et sepultus… I am interested in the ...
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“Deep” Meaning of “Gloria in excelsis Deo”

Sorry if the question is not very deep, please edit the question if it is not accurate in meaning. According to Wikipedia (and common understanding of people who sang Gloria), the meaning is stated ...
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2answers
133 views

What is the origin of the “veneration” meaning of dulia?

The word dulia comes from the Greek doulia (meaning "slavery" or "servitude"). But in Catholicism, the word has taken on a theological meaning, as described in the Catholic Encyclopedia, "signifying ...
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Is filius necessarily a biological descendant?

I saw a Latin inscription in a church in Rome years ago, and there was an interesting feature. It mentioned a pope and his filius. We were a couple of Latinists and we agreed that so it said, but we ...
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1answer
345 views

Was the term “firmamentum” used outside of Christian or Jewish texts?

In a common Jewish or Christian view of the world, the sky is a support for something. I don't recall much of anything about this, but I know that explains the English term firmament. However, did ...
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1answer
114 views

Is my Latin translation wrong, or is the original wrong?

In another 17th century ecclesiastical Latin book I'm reading, Creaturae ad Poenitentiam Dispositio, the author speaks of someone who goes "over the top" in humility, claiming to be the worst of the ...
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99 views

Job 5.7 in the King James version

This extract from the novel 'Three Men in a Boat' refers to Job 5.7: This world is only a probation, and man was born to trouble as the sparks fly upward. I hoped to quote the source, expecting ...
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How to pronounce “mihi” in a Magnificat?

This question came up recently in my choir: how should we pronounce “mihi”? The sentence is from a psalm: Quia fecit mihi magna qui potens est. We’ve encountered it in two Magnificats, the first ...
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198 views

How to translate “Rochester Catholic Schools” into Latin

I need a bit of help with translating the following phrase from English into Latin: Rochester Catholic Schools How would Rochester Catholic Schools be properly translated into Latin?
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388 views

“All-forgiving” expressed with the omni- prefix

The English language has a handful of words starting with omni- to express all-: omniscient all-knowing omnipotent all-powerful omnipresent present everywhere How would one express all-forgiving ...
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1answer
105 views

What does the clause “quae suae salvationis causa exstitit” mean?

I'm having difficulty parsing the following sentence from Alfonsi's Dialogi contra Iudaeos, particularly the clause in bold: Dies Dominica, dies, viz. resurrectionis, quae suae salvationis causa ...
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3answers
250 views

Help with Latin translation from a 17th century ecclesiastical Latin book

The book is Panoplia Clericalis, and the passage I'm having difficulty with (which I suspect is much easier than I think) is, from page 602: De colorum mixtione, qui differunt, ex varia eorum ...
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201 views

Soli Deo gloria: sol or solus?

In the phrase Soli Deo gloria one can read soli in two different ways: If it is solus, the phrase means "glory only to the God" or "glory to the only God". If it is sol, the phrase means "glory to ...
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What did the Council of Braga (~560) say about singing psalms in church?

The First Council of Braga was a meeting of eight bishops that took place around AD 560. They produced a number of decrees, one of which relates to the type of songs that could be sung in church. ...
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1answer
252 views

New devotional title to the Virgin Mary in Latin

A friend of mine is completing a small statue of the Virgin Mary under the new title of Our Lady, Turner of Hearts. As it turns out, he would like to put the inscription of "Our Lady, Turner of Hearts,...
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1answer
570 views

Origins of the expression “mea culpa”?

What are the origins of the expression "mea culpa, mea culpa, mea culpa". I have heard one of my past math professors say this, and was wondering. Thanks.
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296 views

Untranslated (but important) content in Latin? [closed]

I have renewed my self-studies of Latin and I have observed that the greatest effect (and motivation) of studies comes from trying to translate important texts from the foreign language to English or ...
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935 views

“Deus tu conversus vivificabis nos…”

This verse from Psalm lxxxiv: Deus tu conversus vivificabis nos: et plebs tua laetabitur in te. Appears in the Parvum Officium of the BVM (and other liturgical prayers that currently escape my ...
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218 views

“Memento rerum conditor…”

I am still working through the Parvum Officium and I am having a little trouble parsing the first verse of this hymn. I am pretty confident you people can straighten me out. The verse: Memento ...
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1answer
218 views

“Stantes erant pedes nostri…”

Another little puzzle inside Little Office of the BVM, Baronius Press, which is based upon the Gallican Psalter. Psalm cxxi has: Stantes erant pedes nostri, in atriis tuis, Jerusalem. Which it ...
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1answer
82 views

“In convertendo…”

In Psalm cxxv, Little Office of the BVM, Baronius Press, I see: In convertendo Dominus captivitatem Sion: facti sumus sicut consolati: Which it translates as: When the Lord turned again the ...
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1answer
432 views

Miserere mei! Miserere nostri! Why genitive?

Why is the object of mercy ("me", "us") rendered in the genitive in these two cases? miserere mei (Psalm li) miserere nostri (Psalm cxxi) I would expect accusative, or even dative. But, genitive ...
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16k views

What is meant by the expression 'Sic Transit Gloria Mundi'?

The phrase is used when in the ceremony of assigning a new pope, and can be interpreted in many ways. A translation would be: "So pass the worldly glories." How would you interpret its meaning, ...
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1answer
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Evolution of the meaning of sacramentum

I am interested in the development of the word sacramentum, from the classical to the current ecclesiastical usage. The Lewis & Short entry lists the following meanings: I A. Jurid. t. t., ...
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1answer
142 views

Accurate pronunciation of Luther's 86th thesis

I'm working on a short elocution piece that will involve quoting Luther's 86th thesis in the original Latin: Cur Papa, cuius opes hodie sunt opulentissimis Crassis crassiores, non de suis pecuniis ...
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1answer
463 views

What is an overview of the differences between Classical and Ecclesiastical Latin?

I'm aware of some of the differences in pronunciation between the two, and perhaps this can be covered in greater detail elsewhere, but are there also any other key areas of differences (with perhaps ...
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123 views

“To shed blood” – profundere or effundere?

In a 1957 encyclical titled Invicti Athletae, Pope Pius XII wrote: ... non solum profuso sanguine fidei nostrae testimonium Deo praebetur ... which the official translation renders ... not only ...
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160 views

What does “angelorum planta agmini” mean?

I at least partially understand all the invocations in Litaniae in omni tribulatione, but one stays mysterious: "Angelórum planta ágmini" It's quite Google-proof, a quoted search for it returned only ...
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What are the arguments for Classical pronunciations vs. Ecclesiastical pronunciation?

I know to some degree it's a matter of taste, but are the arguments for one pronunciation being used over another? Is it simply a matter of taste, or are there claims that one is "correct" and another ...