Questions tagged [diminutive]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
-1 votes
1 answer
83 views

Lepus: "lepusculus". Longus: "longusculus" or "longiculus"

-iculus or -usculus for "Longus"?, please
ephesinus's user avatar
  • 531
1 vote
0 answers
31 views

What would a little actor be? [duplicate]

I'm trying to make a diminutive of an agent (specifically imperator, to name a prince), and I can't find out how the diminutive suffix -ulus would interact with the agentive -or. My best guess is &...
No Name's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
0 answers
61 views

I can't find via Google "Flumen" diminutives

I have difficulties finding this word' possible diminutives.. this substantive ending in most declesions problematic -en. I answer Google: Google does not give me hypotetic resultates.
ephesinus's user avatar
  • 531
4 votes
2 answers
710 views

For what Vulpes --> Vulpecula, but Sorex never will be Soreculus

Vulpes --> Vulpecula, all right, but: Sorex --> Soriculus, not Soreculus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soriculus
ephesinus's user avatar
  • 531
10 votes
2 answers
851 views

What is the diminutive form of "Insula"?

I recently had to look for various diminutives from latin words, however I got stuck when I had to find the diminutive for "Insula". After many researches on the Internet I came across some ...
Superlatyf's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
677 views

Is there a diminutive form for agent nouns?

I recently read a joke about the use of Latin -tor and -trix nouns in modern English. The punchline was that "trix is for kids". This got me wondering: Is there a way to make diminutives from agent ...
Dhi's user avatar
  • 83
7 votes
1 answer
499 views

Diminutive -ula

I didn't find -ula among the diminutive endings discussed on this site in the question "Constructing Latin diminutives." Hadrian's famous poem "Animula vagula, blandula" uses these 3 diminutives plus "...
Bruno's user avatar
  • 87
9 votes
1 answer
2k views

Does Latin have any neuter words for humans?

In Ancient Greek, diminutives are almost always neuter, regardless of the original noun's gender. This leads to words like paidíon, "small child" (from país "child"), which are neuter even though they ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 65.1k
4 votes
2 answers
184 views

Can one create a diminutive of a truncated form of "frater"?

In Spanish we have the word mano for hermano ("brother"), and that form can give the diminutive manito, when the brother is very small (less than one). In Latin, like in Italian, it might be possible ...
González's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
1k views

What augmentative options are there in Latin?

Augmentative, the opposite of diminutive, is a derived word that means greater size or extent. Diminutives are common and productive in Latin, but how about the opposite? Some Romance languages have ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
310 views

Where does titulus come from?

Is the word titulus a diminutive, or does the -ulus do something else? Do we know where it comes from? L&S mentions that the ti- is related to τίνω and τιμάω, but that does not help me much. I ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
126 views

Is credulus a diminutive?

In the comments to an answer involving the adjective credulus the question has arisen if this word is to be parsed as a diminutive, even if the form of which it would be a diminutive (say, *credus, ...
DaG's user avatar
  • 222
7 votes
2 answers
339 views

What is oculus a diminutive of?

My Latin teacher has said that osculum is the diminutive of os, describing the way one puckers one's mouth when kissing, and that the -culus ending is a diminutive. So what is oculus a diminutive of?
alpha-tetramer's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
192 views

Is ulula a diminutive?

Is ulula (an owl of some kind) a diminutive? It looks like one, but I'm not familiar with a Latin word looking remotely like ula. The word appears to be onomatopoetic to some extent, but it's hard to ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
15 votes
2 answers
2k views

Constructing Latin diminutives

In the course of trying to construct an accurate diminutive form of the word abdomen - which for the record is Latin in origin (in the form abdōmen), having been borrowed by English via Middle French -...
MarqFJA87's user avatar
  • 665
11 votes
2 answers
478 views

Variations on the diminutive: -olus and -ulus

The usual Latin diminutive suffix is -ulus (or -ula or -ulum). However, it sometimes appears as -olus, like in filiolus, aculeolus, petiolus, and bestiola. (And perhaps Venezuela, Venetiola, is a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
15 votes
2 answers
408 views

Can there be double diminutives in Latin?

I've been reading some Latin of the 17th and 18th centuries and am wondering if it is possible for there to be "double diminutives." As I understand it, the word "cerebellum" (Oxford Latin = "brain") ...
twoblackboxes's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
163 views

Is angulus a diminutive?

The word angulus (angle or corner) looks like a diminutive. Was it derived from some other word or stem using the diminutive -ulus suffix, or is looking like a diminutive coincidental? It looks like ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar