Questions tagged [derivation]

For questions about deriving words from other words, like "dictator" from "dictare".

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What does "arcularia" mean in the species name "Nassarius arcularia"?

I encountered the species name Nassarius arcularia and I'm very confused about its construction. Per Wikipedia, this name refers to a species of "nassa mud snails" or "dog whelks". ...
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8 votes
4 answers
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Is there an English word derived from τάσσω, with a similar meaning of arranging/organising?

Apologies if this is the wrong site to ask this on. I am looking for an English word that is derived from Ancient Greek τάσσω, meaning I arrange, I draw up, or I order. I would like a word that evokes ...
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5 votes
0 answers
67 views

What are the semantic, pragmatic, or other differences between -tio, -tus, -tura, and other action nouns

Salvete Omnes, While answering this question on a motto related to computers, I was going to question the authority of Vicipaedia's use of words derived from programma, particularly action nouns from ...
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16 votes
5 answers
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A Latin adjective for New York?

The city of New York is often called Novum Eboracum in Latin. Let us ignore other options for the purpose of this question; I just want to understand city names with two or more words through an ...
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5 votes
2 answers
342 views

Why is the root vowels of 'salsus' and 'saliō' from 'sāl' shortened?

Working my way through the Duolingo course, I noticed that salsus has a short root vowel, even though sāl, sālis¹ is long-voweled. The etymology entry on Wiktionary states that the adjective is from ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Is there a general method for creating an adjective from a noun?

In an answer to making an adjective from a noun, Joonas mentions that creating adjectives from nouns is not a trivial matter and gives a solution to making an adjective out of chicken for an ...
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6 votes
1 answer
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What construction is "διδαχή?"

There is an interesting early Christian document called the Διδαχή, translated into English as "The Teaching." The word seems to be classical, not just Koine. Is this some kind of more ...
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6 votes
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Example of noun described by adjective of the same root (like "homely home" or "reddish red")

In theory, we can easily attach a derived adjective to it's noun source. But, as far as I see this, it almost never happens. Yet, I would say, there are very few examples in some languages that are ...
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6 votes
1 answer
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Is there an etymological connection between "comitia" and "comes"?

In the Roman Republic, the word comitia was used for the various popular assemblies (e.g. comitia centuriata). I can't find any clear indication online as to its etymological roots. I was wondering ...
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8 votes
2 answers
410 views

effeminare = evirare (?)

Assuming that (i) the meanings of vir and femina are indeed opposite and (ii) the meaning of the prefix ex- is quite transparent, why are the verbs evirare and effeminare then synonymous? Are there ...
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8 votes
3 answers
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Is there a diminutive form for agent nouns?

I recently read a joke about the use of Latin -tor and -trix nouns in modern English. The punchline was that "trix is for kids". This got me wondering: Is there a way to make diminutives from agent ...
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Is there a tool/website to see which non-Latin words are derived from a given Latin word?

One way I use to learn Latin vocabulary is to seek for derived Spanish/English words which meaning I know. For instance, gressus derived into egresar and ingresar, Spanish words which mean to exit ("e[...
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6 votes
1 answer
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Formation of words like "essive" or "adessive"

In modern linguistic terminology there are grammatical cases named essive and adessive. However, from a Latinate point of view those formations look abnormal: Usually, the ending -ivus is attached to ...
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7 votes
1 answer
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Italiānus "native or inhabitant of Italy" - Latin or Macaronicanese?

I've come across the adjective italiānus in reference to the modern people of Italy, their culture and language in Internet Latin, and found it suspicious. I would like to know: whether it's ...
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8 votes
1 answer
685 views

Why do numbered months in the ancient Roman calendar have different suffixes?

Wikipedia and other sites detail the (possibly legendary) ancient Roman "Calendar of Romulus": I'm curious about the suffixes to the "numbered" months, the fifth through tenth. The names of the ...
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2 votes
1 answer
52 views

Composites from -σις words

How does one form composites from words in '-σις'? For example, if one wishes to name the fear of vaxing fat, using πάχυνσις, is it παχυνσοφοβία; or παχυνσεοφοβία?
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Did the Romans create any irregular verbs?

Most newly-formed Latin verbs were put into the nice, regular first conjugation: both deriving from existing words (dīcō, -ere > dīctō, -āre) and with borrowings (Graecissō, -āre). English is mostly ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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Does the agent noun always come from the perfect participle stem?

When answering this question, I wrote that an agent noun is always derived from the perfect participle stem. As the (singular masculine form of the) perfect participle is listed in many dictionaries, ...
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4 votes
2 answers
400 views

'plecto, plectere, plexi', -tor/-sor form (agent noun)

How would one add the agent noun suffix (normally -tor) to the verb 'plecto' (I weave/twist)? It's been a few years — about 10 — but if I recall correctly, verbs whose stem ends in 't' ...
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What is a derivative for the Latin word, liberi (children)? [closed]

Derivative can be anything for liberi.
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9 votes
1 answer
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What augmentative options are there in Latin?

Augmentative, the opposite of diminutive, is a derived word that means greater size or extent. Diminutives are common and productive in Latin, but how about the opposite? Some Romance languages have ...
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6 votes
1 answer
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Translating "order of protection and conservation"

An author friend recently asked me for help with a Latin name: in his book, a group calls itself the "order of protection and conservation", but in Latin to be pretentious (altum videtur…). My ...
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3 votes
2 answers
386 views

How to choose correct word variants?

I asked a question earlier. For some time now, it's occured to me that a pattern is forming: All my questions about the Latin language are basically the same. The subjects change, but the underlying ...
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7 votes
1 answer
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Who carries something ending in -ium?

There is a traditional Finnish instrument (kannel or kantele) which tends to be called nablium in Latin. How do I form the adjective for someone bearing this instrument using -fer? There are things ...
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9 votes
1 answer
183 views

Interchange between u- and o-stem forms in suffixed derivatives (e.g. "lectus", "lectuarius")

A little while back, I asked a question about the alleged Latin word "tribalis" (which it seems was not actually used), and I mentioned that it seemed to me that it would be an irregular formation ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Forming compound words in Latin: helicopter

I would like to understand the formation of Latin compound words through the example of the word "helicopter". This obviously has a Greek origin, and I would like redo the construction with two Latin ...
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5 votes
3 answers
203 views

Equivalent of "-less"

Given a Latin noun, how does one transform it into an adjective meaning "lacking [noun]" (the equivalent of English "-less")? I know that "having (a lot of) [noun]" would be formed with the ending "-...
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12 votes
1 answer
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How can participles (inflected forms) be distinguished from deverbal adjectives (derived forms) in Latin?

Many modern linguistic analyses of languages like English draw a sharp theoretical distinction between participles, which are analyzed as inflected forms belonging to the paradigm of some verb, and ...
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5 votes
2 answers
145 views

What is the diminutive of κῆτος?

A classic diminutive suffix in Ancient Greek is -ίδιον, which forms a neuter second noun. But what happens when this is applied to a noun with a vowel in the stem? For a concrete example, if I wanted ...
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5 votes
1 answer
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Why vesperascit instead of vesperescit?

I was recently working on a little translation project and my intuition and memory suggested that "evening comes" is vesperescit. Checking dictionaries corrected me: it is vesperascit instead. Why is ...
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7 votes
2 answers
330 views

Inflections of Ζεύς

Διώνη is the name of a Titaness, a nymph, and Phoenician goddess. And according to the Wikipedia article on said Titaness, it's derived from the feminine form of the genitive of Ζεύς. And according to ...
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4 votes
3 answers
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What is plant-based or vegetarian food?

Is there a Latin adjective which means "vegetarian" or "plant-based" and can be applied to food? In this context, I don't need to make a distinction between vegetarian and vegan, for example; I just ...
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4 votes
1 answer
510 views

Instances of Actions - Verbs into Nouns

In English, we can take a verb like "swim" and refer to it as a noun in reference to occurrences. For example, "That was a good swim," "I have three swims next week." Is there a similar construct ...
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5 votes
2 answers
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Rules to constructing a proper compound noun in Ancient Greek

I know this StackExchange is dedicated to Latin, but since one for Greek/Ancient Greek is currently under proposal, I was advised to post my question here after having posted it on Linguistics. I am ...
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3 votes
0 answers
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Is the suffix -izo, -izare, -izavi, -izatum formal?

The suffix -ize (or similar) are used to form verbs from nouns and adjectives in several Romance languages. Wiktionary suggests that this stems from the vulgar latin -izo, -izare, -izavi, -izatum, ...
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1 vote
0 answers
136 views

What is the relation between -men and -mentum?

When answering this question about incrementum, I recalled the similarity of the suffixes -mentum and -men. If the linked Wiktionary pages are to be trusted, they are etymologically related, both ...
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7 votes
2 answers
1k views

Suffix counterpart of klepto-?

I'm trying to come up with a suffix counterpart to the prefix klepto- (basically meaning "related to theft"), seeing that no such thing exists (and thus what I'm doing is technically neologism). For ...
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10 votes
2 answers
340 views

Why homicide instead of hominicide?

The word homicida is attested in classical Latin, and the English "homicide" is an obvious loan. The word seems to come from homo and caedere. Why is the first part homi- instead of homini-? The stem ...
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8 votes
2 answers
352 views

How productive was the participle in -menus in Latin?

Greek has the medium participle ending in -menos. It has a couple of occurrences in Latin, too, of which I only seem to remember alere > alumnus now. How many words are there in Latin that contain ...
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3 votes
1 answer
413 views

About the formation of the word "euthanasia"

The etymology of euthanasia is pretty straightforward, as this site shows: Early 17th century (in the sense ‘easy death’): from Greek, from eu ‘well’ + thanatos ‘death’. What is less ...
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5 votes
0 answers
248 views

Etymology of "ingeniōsus" and "ingenuus"

Can someone please explain how these two words, ingenuus ingeniōsus both deriving from gignō, come to mean what they respectively do? BACKGROUND According to Wiktionary, ingenuus is made of in- +‎ ...
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9 votes
1 answer
404 views

Deriving adjectives from city names

One can often derive adjectives from city names, the most famous example probably being Romanus from Roma. Such derivatives are typically formed with -anus or -ensis. My impression is that -anus is ...
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7 votes
1 answer
109 views

Expressing a number of years with a single word

An answer to an earlier question about age of wine introduced me to adjectives for specific ages in years. Similarly, there are nouns for periods of time in years. For example: bimus & biennium ...
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10 votes
1 answer
418 views

Comparing per- and de- as intensifying prefixes

Both per- an de- can be used as intensifying prefixes. It seems that per- is far more common, but also de- occurs (detritus, defetisci, deplorare…). There is also deperire, where de- seems to ...
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5 votes
1 answer
353 views

A verb for Googling in Latin

In English "Google" has become a verb meaning "to search using Google". In Finnish the name "Google" is not a valid verb, so it has been modified to "googlata" which is conjugated regularly. How ...
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5 votes
2 answers
752 views

Comparing utopia and atopia

For the purposes of this questtion, let me spell the English word "atopy" as "atopia". I have no idea why the the same kind of etymological background (same derivative on the same Greek word τόπος) ...
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6 votes
1 answer
445 views

Nominalized adjective in Latin?

How to nominalize adjectives in Latin? In English, adjectives can be nominalized with a slight different in meaning: "the sick man", "the sick". In German, it's possible to nominalize the present ...
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11 votes
2 answers
619 views

How is the supine related to the derived fourth declension noun?

I asked yesterday about the word venatu. There was a good answer and good comments, but I want to ask a broader related question more specifically — especially due to TKR's comment. I want to know how ...
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8 votes
2 answers
366 views

Can the supine ablative be used for motion?

I came across an Asterix translated into Latin. In the first story page the village chief notices that Asterix and Obelix return from a hunt and says: Asterix atque Obelix venatu redeunt! My question ...
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8 votes
2 answers
1k views

A verb for networking

What would be a good Latin verb for networking? I don't mean the study of computer networks, but the verb "to network" in the sense of making new acquaintances for business or other purpose. In ...
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