Questions tagged [declension]

For questions about declension—the inflection of Latin nouns and adjectives to mark grammatical features such as case and number.

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4
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1answer
243 views

Feminine forms of adjectives in -ων: why ἀέκουσα, but not ἀπείρουσα, ἀμύμουσα?

The wiktionary entry for -ων says it's an ending cognate with stuff like Latin -ens, -iens, and gives the feminine as -ουσα. Therefore it makes sense that we get ἀέκων, ἀέκουσα. But then we have ...
5
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4answers
1k views

Why does domus have masculine forms?

The word domus is normally a feminine, IVth declension noun and hence the adjectives that modify it are feminine. However, sometimes domus appears to take masculine forms in some cases. For example, ...
4
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1answer
144 views

What is wanting in Gildersleeve's declension charts?

In Gildersleeves Latin Grammar you can find declension charts with the word wanting inserted in 3 places I II III Nom. a. us (...
7
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3answers
856 views

Is "victurus" a future participle of "vivo" and "vinco"?

I find this hard to believe, but these pages regarding vivo and vinco confirm this to be the case. This also seems to be confirmed on this website. I cannot link directly to the words vivo and vinco, ...
3
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1answer
65 views

How to you convert a Latin word, such as voluntas, into a name, specifically a surname?

I've been wondering how to properly convert Latin words into names to signify the importance of certain concepts to a person, and met conflicting information online. My default assumption would be to ...
9
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2answers
759 views

Is "Io" accusative case in "Iuppiter, rex deorum, pulchram Io amabat"?

In The Adventures of Io, a story found in Thirty-eight Latin Stories, Designed to Accompany Wheelock's Latin, the first sentence of the story is as follows: Iuppiter, rēx deōrum, pulchram Iō amābat, ...
6
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1answer
196 views

Why is it "Discipulus pulcher est" and not "Discipulus pulchrus est"?

I think its something with declension, but can't quite wrap my head around why it would be pulcher instead of pulchrus for that phrase.
11
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1answer
353 views

Alternative methods of ordering declensions

Are there other ways to organize declensions other than the traditional numerical method? If so, what are the pro and cons of that system as compared to the standard system of the first declension, ...
4
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1answer
117 views

How do you say "Forum Friends" in Latin?

In English, if you have people you are friends with from a forum (online or otherwise), you could call them "forum friends". How would you say this in Latin? Can you decline forum as a ...
4
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3answers
615 views

Why is *dōna* the plural acc. Instead of *donos* like the rest of the 2nd declensions?

I am currently studying the declensions for nouns (currently on the 2nd one) and saw this difference. amīcōs, fīliōs, agrōs VS dōna
4
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1answer
152 views

Plural for Succubus and Incubus

Succubus & incubus don't show up in the Latin dictionaries I've searched. I'm wondering what the plurals would be. I did find succuba, 1st decl fem. Could it be that it didn't morph into a 2nd ...
1
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1answer
90 views

Suffixes and different stem words in transversarium and transversus?

The difference between transversarium and transversus confuses me, this occurs with processus (masculine) transversus foramen (neutri) transversarium where the endings, sus and sa-ri-um, are ...
11
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0answers
114 views

Why is "porticus, porticūs" a feminine fourth-declension noun?

The fourth declension was one of the less common inflection pattern for Latin nouns, and the vast majority of fourth declension nouns are masculine nouns ending in the deverbal abstract noun suffix -...
5
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1answer
120 views

Are there ever separate number and case markers in Latin?

It seems to me that in Latin the case endings in singular and plural have very little in common. For an example of singular–plural pairs: puella–puellae, puellam–puellas, puellae–puellarum, puellae–...
6
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2answers
431 views

Does an irregular word decline regularly if it is used as a proper name?

Does an irregular word decline regularly if it is used as a proper name? For example, imagine there is a dog name Rex (=King). We might have: Vide Regem currentem. See Rex run. However, since Rex is ...
5
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1answer
141 views

How to decline Greek proper nouns ending in -ēs in Latin?

I was browsing the OLD today and then I noticed the following entry: Stagīrītēs, Stagē- ~-ae m. A person who originates from Stagira in Macedonia. Two examples are given there: Aristotelem ~em Cic. Ac....
4
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1answer
270 views

Is unius an irregular genitive?

I notice that the genitive of unus can apparently be either the regular uni, or can also be unius. Is this form, unius, just a completely irregular oddity, or is there some logical precedent for it? ...
6
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1answer
181 views

What is the etymology of 'cuius' and is it different from 'quis'?

'cuius' (and 'cui') is an interesting word in that it stands out as different from the other terms in the declension of 'quis'. It seems to be pronounced differently. 'quis' is /kwis/ but 'cuius' is /...
6
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2answers
520 views

What is the difference between ἐκκλησίας and ἐκκλησίαν?

I know the root word is ἐκκλησία, but I don't understand the declensions.
4
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2answers
499 views

In "fortis fortuna adiuvat" is "fortis" accusative plural?

Fortis fortuna adiuvat, is fortis accusative plural here? Fortis has different forms for the same conjugation as I see at Wiktionary, and I couldn't find which forms adiuvare takes as an exhaustive ...
4
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1answer
104 views

Deponent verb participle gender

If we consider a deponent verb such as arbitrārī in the perfect tense, hence arbitrātus sum/es/est, is the participle arbitrātus supposed to be declined like a regular adjective? For example if one ...
13
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1answer
512 views

Why are so many Latin men's names (cognomina) in the usually-feminine first declension?

The first declension, with the -a ending, is usually feminine. Why are so many men's names (cognomina), however, in the first declension -- Seneca, Cinna, Aggrippa, Sulla, and more? This is far out of ...
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1answer
52 views

Carpe sciurum (sieze/harvest the squirrel?)

Would 'carpe sciurum' be a functional translation of 'seize the squirrel'? (As in to 'harvest' or 'pluck' the squirrel?)
6
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1answer
114 views

Nepos' Themistocles: ut ingratis omnes ad depugnandum cogerentur?

I am reading the biography of Themistocles by Cornelius Nepos. He recounts the story of how Themistocles used a deceit to bring about the naval engagement that went down in history as the famous ...
3
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3answers
221 views

What case does 'plus' take?

I don't have any information about what case to use with 'plus' (or 'magis'). In dictionaries usually only prepositions take some case, and it is showed in parentheses. In my language, 'more' takes ...
9
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1answer
270 views

How did the fourth declension neuter dative singular become different from the non-neuter ending?

Usually, when a neuter case ending is different from the non-neuter ending in the same declension, the difference is in the nominative or accusative case (e.g. -us and -um in the second declension ...
5
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1answer
102 views

Where does the -τ- come from in the oblique stem of some Greek neuter nouns with nom/acc sing forms in -ς?

I just learned that some Greek neuter nouns of the third declension with a nominative/accusative singular form ending in -ς have oblique stems in -τ-, which surprised me. I expected τ-stem neuter ...
6
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3answers
648 views

Sentence which includes an example of each case

I'm looking for a sentence which includes the usage of each case of Latin. For example, a student could mark each word in the sentence to indicate its case and function for ease of learning. Extreme ...
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4answers
5k views

Meaning of "dies illa" from Dies Irae

The first verse from "Dies Irae" goes like Dies irae, dies illa I'm trying to understand what "illa" is referring to. According to the declension table for pronouns, "illa" corresponds either to ...
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2answers
1k views

How should one latinize this name?

A friend of mine, whose name is Raoni (he's brazilian, his name comes from a native root, also the tonic vowel is the very last [i]), started learning latin and I've been studying for a while. I ...
17
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1answer
622 views

What are the relative frequencies of cases in Latin?

Latin has seven cases: nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, ablative, vocative, locative. What are their relative frequencies in classical Latin? I suppose an answer would have to be based on ...
12
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2answers
667 views

Which Latin declension is most common?

Does anyone know the rough proportions of Latin words that fall into each of the five declensions? Which is most common? Which is least common?
9
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1answer
105 views

Why is the proper name Apollos not declined in the Vulgate

Saint Apollos was a companion of Saint Paul mentioned several times in the New Testament. In the Latin Vulgate, his name is transliterated as an indeclinable noun, Apollo. My question is, why was his ...
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0answers
63 views

Checking Greek declensions: software or reference?

Although quite a few Greek words follow the same simple patterns of declension, I'm finding that there are enough complications that I'm often unsure of whether I'm getting it right. Is there a ...
3
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0answers
51 views

προσώπατα versus πρόσωπα, προσώπασι versus προσώποις in Homer

I'm working on learning Homeric vocabulary, and for this purpose I've written a script using CLTK to search for forms of a particular word through the Iliad and Odyssey. The idea is that I don't want ...
2
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1answer
85 views

Declination of "potentia" with preposition "in"

In philosophy, e.g. in Spinoza, there is the Latin word "potentia" that is often translated as a power, or capacity, to act (potentia agendi) and to suffer actions. I am wondering what is the right ...
4
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2answers
509 views

How do you latinize the name "Cole"?

Salvete, I can't figure out how I would go about latinizing my name. I would also appreciate a declension of my latinized name. I was thinking that maybe "Colus," "Colis," or "Coleus" could work, ...
2
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0answers
36 views

What order of the cases did the Romans use when declining nouns? [duplicate]

In modern books, two orders of the cases can be found: nom, gen, dat, acc, abl, and nom, acc, gen, dat, abl. Which one did the Romans use? Or did they use some entirely different order?
4
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0answers
73 views

Why is the form "Antares" used as an ablative in some Latin texts?

Jam inquiro nomen stellae Antares. Multa documenta quae "ab Antares" dicunt comperi. At non scio ablativi qui in "es" terminantur. Potestne nomen "Antares" indeclinabile esse? Quare? Exempla: "Lanx ...
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2answers
157 views

Essentialia negotii transaction's essentials

So essentialia negotii is transaction's essentials. How would one say The transaction's essential things, transactions' essential things, essential things of the transaction and essential things of ...
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2answers
3k views

Is the adjective in latin put after the noun or before?

E.g Is the legal term essentialia negotii correct use of the grammar(declension, agreement, word order) rules or not? Should it not be negotiorum essentialium so that the case, the number and the ...
4
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1answer
100 views

Declension uncertainty regarding Ablative / Nominative

I'm struggling, particularly, with determining the correct case for some of the words in the following expressions: Natura est semper invicta Here, is the word "invicta" in Ablative or Nominative ...
5
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1answer
190 views

How did vāti-s become vātēs?

To my understanding, vātēs "bard" started out as an i-stem noun, built on the stem vāti- (probably from something like *weh₂t-i-). So I would expect the nominative to look something like *vāti-s. ...
6
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3answers
200 views

Where does the word "tudes" 'hammer' show up in texts?

Lewis and Short has an entry for a noun tŭdes, with the genitive singular given as "is (ĭtis, acc. to Fest. p. 253 Müll.)". It is defined as "a hammer, mallet". The two citations in the entry show the ...
6
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1answer
127 views

Can Greek letter names be declined?

There seems to be solid evidence that Latin letter names were indeclinable. But in Greek, several letters' names do fit into standard declension patterns: sigma, for instance, might actually be a -ma ...
7
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1answer
198 views

Dies and the fifth declension

In an answer to this question on Ζεύς Draconis mentions (quoting his own post on another site): The accusative form of the root, *dyēm (cf AGrk Zēn), also survived in Latin, in the form *diēm > ...
3
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1answer
72 views

Words belong to the first and second declension at the same time

Exter, magnus, diduus, they all belong to the first declension and also the second declension. Why these adjectives are so special?
4
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1answer
327 views

Do first-declension neuter nouns or adjectives have plural forms?

Although almost all first-declension nouns are feminine or masculine, there seem to be a handful of adjectives that belong to the first declension for all genders, and at least one substantive noun, ...
8
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2answers
316 views

Was "Pascha" ever used as a neuter first-declension noun?

Before today, I thought that there was no neuter substantive1 noun with a nominative singular in a and a genitive singular in ae. However, I have encountered references to a possible exception: some ...
5
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2answers
5k views

How to find the stem of any word?

I am wondering if the stem of every word has an exact form? For example: For the word genus, how could you determine is it gen or gener? For the word līber, how could you determine is it līber or ...