Questions tagged [dative]

For questions about the dative case.

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5
votes
1answer
188 views

Is "nulli nocendum" ambiguous?

In Phaedrus fables in I.26: Nulli nocendum: si quis vero laeserit, Multandum simili iure fabella admonet. According to what I was able to find in 3 different translations nulli nocendum is ...
5
votes
1answer
120 views

Is dative of possession used in interrogatives?

I did a Latin lesson and the phrase was: Estne liber tuus? Which apparently is supposed to mean "Is that your book?" However, I thought in such situations the dative is supposed to be used,...
8
votes
1answer
704 views

Writing "I'm proud of myself"

I came up with "mihi superbus sum" with "mihi" as the Dative form of ego for "of myself", "superbus" for "proud", and "sum" for "I'm&...
6
votes
2answers
677 views

Quidquid veto non licet, certe non oportet

I'm trying to translate this sentence, but I'm not sure how. It looks like either veto is the dative (substantive?) meaning 'old', or it's the verb veto, 'I stop from happening'. With 'non licet', I ...
7
votes
1answer
383 views

Why is "Onus" in the Dative Case?

North & Hillard Ex. 211: a general addresses his soldiers as an approaching enemy is about to encircle them. The following is to be translated into Latin: "But since the enemy are already ...
2
votes
1answer
143 views

Does relinquo take the dative?

I thought that normally relinquo takes the accusative, not the dative, so I am having a hard time figuring out the following sentence: Ūsque ad vesperum currēbat, neque nocturnum tempus sibi ad ...
7
votes
0answers
172 views

On the syntax of some datives in a beautiful Ciceronian structure

I was wondering if you would like to share your thoughts on the grammar of the datives in the following texts from Cicero. The second example is a very interesting one provided by Kingshorsey in an ...
3
votes
1answer
246 views

Can *esse* be elided with a dative of possession?

The possessive dative construction involves a subject possessee, a dative possessor, and a form of esse: Mihi soror est. Dicit sibi sororem esse. In this construction, is esse ever elided? That is, ...
7
votes
2answers
181 views

Translate "Look me in the eyes" (dative of possession vs possessive adjective vs accusative pronoun)

There are basically 3 approaches: Specta mihi in oculos Specta me, in oculos Specta (in) oculos meos Probably, there is no "correct" translation, but maybe there is more natural and ...
2
votes
1answer
110 views

Is this a dative of reference? Can it be translated as "of?'

Text is (for context): Segregatio autem vel evocatio haec, electio sive selectio appellatur duplici fere de causa: vel, quia e communi hominum caetu populi saepe nonnulli aliis quibusdam certo ...
3
votes
1answer
172 views

Why " sibi " in " sibi conscius"?

Originally " conscius" meant " knowing something with someone, sharing the knowledge of something with someone". ( Ref : Gaffiot Dictionnaire Latin Français). This may explain why a pronoun ( "sibi")...
6
votes
1answer
249 views

Can a "dative of agent" appear in an Ablative Absolute construction?

I was wondering to what extent the syntactic distribution of so-called “dative of agent” and that of “ablative of agent” is different. For example, besides appearing in verbal contexts (e.g., Proelium ...
6
votes
1answer
266 views

"Habere" VS dative and genitive of possession?

To mean something that is not owned legally, not owned with the meaning of "being the owner", like when I say "We have a pope", could I use "habere" or only the dative or genitive of possession? Is ...
4
votes
1answer
508 views

Audire, with accusative or dative?

The verb audire is many times (if not most of the times) found with an accusative. For example, in the Vulgata, 4 Regum, 22:11 says: et audisset rex verba libri legis Domini, scidit vestimenta sua. ...
4
votes
4answers
1k views

Disambiguation of "nobis vobis" and "nobis nobis"

For many words, the dative and ablative take the same form. Two examples are nos and vos (nobis and vobis, respectively). Imagine you want to say something like "from us to you [plural]" (where "...
1
vote
1answer
159 views

Ablative of Specification or Dative of Reference

Spinoza, Ethics, De Dei, Propositio 15, Scholium: Ego saltem satis clare meo quidem judicio demonstravi ... meo judicio is dative or ablative? I cant recognize that it is Ablative of ...
3
votes
1answer
550 views

The grammar of the expression "mihi cordi est"

Recently I encountered the phrase "mihi cordi est", after googling it I saw it is quite common phrase that seem to mean "it pleases me". For example: "vita horrida, arida, atque dura, mihi cordi est". ...
1
vote
2answers
65 views

Genitive with assigno

In Ethics, De Dei, Proposition 11, Second demonstration we read: Cujuscunque rei assignari debet causa seu ratio tam cur existit quam cur non existit cujuscunque rei is genitive, but ...
6
votes
2answers
351 views

"ne paelici suspectaretur" (Tacitus)

Tacitus, Annales 4.3: pellit domo Seianus uxorem Apicatam, ex qua tres liberos genuerat, ne paelici suspectaretur. The translation on Perseus (Church and Brodribb) gives: Sejanus, to avert his ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Using "ad" vs. dative

The self-exercises in CAPVT VIII of Wheelock's Latin (7th Edition) include the following sentence (#11): Litterās ad virginem scrībit. He is writing a letter to the maiden. I'm confused about ...
4
votes
1answer
482 views

Credere with Dative or Accusative

I came across this sentence in a fictional dialog in my Latin lesson. difficile est mihi hoc credere. In this context, hoc refers to someone else's claim of accomplishment. I had learned earlier ...
6
votes
3answers
229 views

Does Latin have anything like this German syntax? (dative of possession)

German has an interesting dative of possession construction where the possessor goes in the dative but a form of "to be" is not needed. This means that the thing or person being possessed ...
4
votes
1answer
107 views

Passive periphrastic with two datives

I want to translate the following as a passive periphrastic: You must give your money to me! My attempt so far is: pecunia tua tibi danda est mihi Because Latin rarely acknowledges word order, ...
6
votes
3answers
141 views

On the dative of reference

If I want to say in Latin I speak Latin easily, I say: In Latīnā facile loquere possum. But if I want to add to this the idea that it is in my opinion that I speak Latin easily, do I simply use ...
8
votes
1answer
698 views

Dative–ablative ambiguity

When I first looked into Latin, I saw in a textbook that the dative and ablative singular are the same in the second declension: nom. servus acc. servum gen. servi dat. servō abl. servō voc. serve ...
5
votes
1answer
163 views

Can the articular infinitive be a dative of means? (Greek)

I am translating this sentence from English to classical Greek. There is great danger that the students may harm themselves by not taking care of themselves. Let us decide how to help them. My ...
9
votes
1answer
754 views

'Credo' with dative problem

Here is a small problem with 'credo', there is an example in my dictionary saying that 'crede mihi (dat.)' means 'believe me'. Gildersleeve & Lodge gives credere under Dative with Intransitive ...
6
votes
1answer
98 views

Does 'concrescere' take dative?

I wonder is 'rigido rostro' here in dative or ablative? Under "Dative and verbs compounded with prepositions" (Gildersleeve & Lodge) it is said, that " Many verbs compounded with the prepositions ...
4
votes
1answer
146 views

Dative of Personal Interest?

In this line in Ovid Metamorphoses Book III. 505, is fratri put in the Dative because ' of the person in whose honour, or interest, or advantage or for whose pleasure, an action takes place, or the ...
11
votes
3answers
402 views

How to work around the missing cases of vis?

The word vis does not have singular genitive and dative forms. This makes it difficult to use vis. (I was reminded of this difficulty by this Star Wars question.) Can you suggest methods of working ...
8
votes
3answers
464 views

What are the normal genitive and dative singular forms of "alius"?

Some sources mention a genitive singular alius, but I've also seen aliae. And I don't recall seeing a dative singular ali, but neither do I remember alio. I think several forms exist, including even ...
10
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1answer
1k views

Miserere mei! Miserere nostri! Why genitive?

Why is the object of mercy ("me", "us") rendered in the genitive in these two cases? miserere mei (Psalm li) miserere nostri (Psalm cxxi) I would expect accusative, or even dative. But, genitive ...
6
votes
2answers
451 views

Is "cum haruspex in templo cenaret" correct Latin in this sentence?

Cum haruspex in templo cenaret, rex ipse appropinquabat. My problem is with the part in bold, firstly the cenaret, an imperfect subunctive does not agree with haruspex. (Or does it? I could be wrong.)...
10
votes
2answers
214 views

Who do I match numerically when using the possessive dative?

When using the dative of a noun in combination with a form of the verb esse to indicate possession, should the verb be in the same number as the subject or as the predicate noun(s) when there is a ...
15
votes
2answers
1k views

Why did Medieval Latin use "ad" with the accusative instead of just using the dative?

Part of Documents of Medieval Latin (page 14) states several differences between Classical Latin and Medieval Latin. One is an increased use of prepositions where Classical Latin used a simple ...