Questions tagged [coniugatio]

For questions about conjugating Latin verbs.

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0answers
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Alternative forms in second-person singular present active subjunctive [duplicate]

I am trying to translate "plan [in order] to achieve" into Latin. From the dictionary it looks like both "meditator ut consequaris" and "meditator ut consequare" are grammatically correct. Are they, ...
4
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0answers
93 views

Cur coniugationes systematis praesentis sunt tam dissimiles cum eae cum coniugationibus systematis perfecti comparentur?

TL;DR & the actual question For those who don't need an explanation of all verb endings and the ways in which they differ from each other, my question follows below. For those who might need a ...
4
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0answers
98 views

What combinations of tenses appear in periphrasis?

Periphrastic verb forms, specifically a participle plus an auxiliary verb, are very common in English ("I am writing now"). They also appear in Latin and Ancient Greek and a number of Romance ...
3
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3answers
123 views

How to do indefinite person with verbs

In English you can conjugate like so: I eat You eat He/she/it eats We eat You all eat They eat But you can also conjugate with a variety of “indefinite” pronouns: One eats Everyone ...
3
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2answers
102 views

Understanding 'percepset' instead of 'percepisset'

When looking at the L&S entry for percipio, I came across a surprising perfect form: percepset. The contraction percepisset > percepset lookst similar to cogitavisset > cogitasset. Are ...
3
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1answer
104 views

Conjugating confluo for app title

I have a software product called Continua. I want to make another with a title like Confluo. What are some reasonable variants of that word for this purpose — confluere, etc.? I'm feeling like it ...
3
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1answer
46 views

Are there Latin verbs with Greek cognates in all four conjugations?

Off the top of my head, I can think of a few Latin verbs with obvious Greek cognates: pherō~ferō "to bear", pheugō~fugiō "to flee". But all the words I can think of are in the third conjugation. Are ...
3
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2answers
87 views

Is ulcantur a subjunctive of ultus?

I have a prayer I say every morning. It includes the word ulcantur. I can't find a translation. I think it is a subjunctive for ultus? O Piisima Virgo Maria, quæ caput serpentis contrivisti, protege ...
3
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1answer
114 views

Did the Romans create any irregular verbs?

Most newly-formed Latin verbs were put into the nice, regular first conjugation: both deriving from existing words (dīcō, -ere > dīctō, -āre) and with borrowings (Graecissō, -āre). English is mostly ...
3
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1answer
47 views

Translating sentence but how do I deal with conjugation - if it's plural in English, is it plural in Latin?

I want to translate "Fear is a crossroads" but I'm confused because in English, "crossroads" is plural, but uses the singular article "a". So would my sentence be "Timor est compitum" or "Timor sunt ...
3
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1answer
90 views

Stem for derivatives like figura, statura and cultura

I learned in a recent question that derived nouns like figura, statura and cultura do not always look like the future participle but are actually formed from a different stem. Examples of differences: ...
3
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1answer
82 views

Conjugation/grammar for fictitious title

In a work of fiction, I have an Order of ordained detectives that do not exist. I use the term Lictor Rebus Sanctorae for the Order, and Lictor Rebus Sanctorus for the male protagonist. I know this ...
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0answers
67 views

What do I do when “ait” fails me?

In a separate answer, I was trying to use ait in an English sentence: If the Lex Julia can ait its wording… …but I ran into a problem. Even ignoring my bastard mixture of English and Latin, "can ...
2
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1answer
114 views

What evidence is there for volēre over volere?

In this answer, fdb mentions the Classical verb volō, velle transforming into *voleō, volēre in Vulgar Latin. The main evidence for this is a form volendi in Augustine and reflexes like voglio, volere ...
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0answers
50 views

Contraction of the v-perfect in the first person singular

When there is talk about the v-perfect contraction, I don't ever see first person forms used as examples, only forms like "amavisti" becoming "amasti". So my question is whether first person singular ...
2
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0answers
69 views

What is the origin of the active perfect indicative personal endings?

The active perfect stem conjugation in Latin resembles the conjugation of esse a lot, but I recently learned that it is likely to be a coincidence. However, the active perfect indicative forms do not ...
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2answers
122 views

Second vs. third person in future imperative for a general rule or maxim

I am trying to translate "plan [in order] to achieve" into Latin. Is it more appropriate to use second ("meditator ut consequaris") or third person ("meditator ut consequatur") in future imperative ...
1
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1answer
85 views

Are there iota or hypsilon contract verbs?

In Greek, verbs are classified as "consonant-stem" or "vowel-stem". Vowel-stem verbs, aptly, have a vowel at the end of their stem. And in the Attic dialect, if this vowel is a short alpha, epsilon, ...
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2answers
47 views

When conjugating a verb, when should the vowel preceding a personal ending contain a macron? [duplicate]

I am working through ch 1 of Wheelock's Latin, and I am confused as to when the vowel immediately preceding a personal ending should receive a macron. For example, here is the present indicative ...

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