Questions tagged [conditions]

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What are the differences between conditional and proviso clauses?

In Keller's Learn to Read Latin: The conjunction dum, sometimes strengthened by the adverb modo, "only", may introduce a subordinate clause stating a provision under which the event of the ...
Tim's user avatar
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How would one express this type of conditional in Latin?

Out of optimism, stupidity or both I am attempting to translate Alice in Wonderland into Latin. I just came across this bit: “Well!” thought Alice to herself, “after such a fall as this, I shall ...
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Present vs. perfect tense in potential conditions

Potential conditions, in the English speaking world also known under the name “future less vivid” (for a critique of that particular term, see here), are conditional sentences that talk about supposed ...
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If you do something long enough

In my answer to this recent question, I translated "when you look long into the abyss, the abyss also looks into you" as: si diu voraginem intuitus eris, etiam vorago te intuebitur. That is, ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
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Oblique cases and 'si quis'

It is convenient to formulate conditions with si quis, for example: Si quis me audiet canentem, non gaudebit. If anyone hears me singing, they will not enjoy it. Here the same unnamed person is the ...
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Subjunctive Protasis and Aorist Indicative Apodosis

ἐὰν μή τις μένῃ ἐν ἐμοί, ἐβλήθη ἔξω ὡς τὸ κλῆμα ... (John 15:6) μένῃ is present subjunctive and ἐβλήθη is aorist indicative. In many grammar books, there are two types of conditional sentence which ...
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Imposing Conditions On The Conditional

North & Hillard p.157: Footnote (1): "Moreover in Impossible Conditions, if the verb of the apodosis is possum, debeo, oportet, or a gerundive (or any verb expressing obligation or possibility), ...
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Wondering how to translate imperfect subjunctives (in a conditional sentence)

I have to translate this sentence for homework: si verba patris a liberis non audita essent, timerent. I believe the verb form in both the protasis and apodosis is imperfect subjunctive. I am ...
TheIronKnuckle's user avatar
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Irreal condition expressed by a prepositional phrase

In English one can say: Without you I would not be here. This is roughly the same thing as: If you had not helped, I would not be here. The exact wording depends on context. In the second ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
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Translation of would

I found some examples of conditional clauses whose translation may include the word "would". They are: Si Marcus Iuliam amet, ea eum amet. If Marcus should [perhaps ever some day] love Julia, she ...
Alfie González's user avatar
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What if...? (Interrogative conditionals)

In English, "what if...?" is a succinct way to ask what would happen if some counterfactual happened to be true. Is there an idiomatic equivalent in Latin? The sequence of tenses gives plenty of ...
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Greek: syntax of dilemmas in the past

I want to find out how Greek expresses the protases of conditions like the following: What was I to do? If I remained in Athens I would be killed; if I left, I would lose all my property. This is ...
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What does a "si" clause followed by a "nisi" clause mean?

In the Vulgate Bible, I came across this sentence. Vivit Dominus Deus Israel, in cuius conspectu sto, si erit annis his ros et pluvia, nisi iuxta oris mei verba. [As] the Lord God of Israel lives, in ...
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Can a relative adjective begin a conditional statement in Attic Greek?

In my textbook, there's a chapter on conditional relative clauses, in which it explains how relative pronouns and adverbs, especially when they are indefinite, can form the protasis of a conditional ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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Verb forms after "tamquam si"

In Suetonius's Vita Horati, a letter from Augustus to Horace is quoted, which includes the sentence: Sume tibi aliquid iuris apud me, tamquam si convictor mihi fueris. The Loeb translation gives: "...
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