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Questions tagged [cibus]

For questions about food.

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12
votes
2answers
5k views

Breakfast, lunch, dinner?

How to translate 'breakfast', 'lunch', and 'dinner' into Latin? I gather cena is an adequate translation of 'dinner', but google translate produces many possibilities for 'breakfast' and 'lunch', and ...
12
votes
2answers
1k views

Latin words for various types of diets (carnivore, vegetarian, vegan, etc.)?

Does Latin have words for the various types of diets, e.g., "vegetarian," "vegan," etc.? St. Thomas Aquinas, seemingly referring to what we today would call a "vegan," says (Summa Theologica II-II q. ...
10
votes
1answer
139 views

Apicius' “sp[h]ondyli vel fonduli”

Apicius' de re coquinaria (Roman recipe book believed to have been compiled in the 4th/5th century CE) contains, in the book 3 "cepuros" on vegetables, a paragraph (XX, recipes 115 to 121) entitled "...
9
votes
1answer
231 views

Is there oil without olives?

Is the Latin word oleum ("oil") related to oliva ("olive")? If yes, how? The two words look similar, but oleum does not look like a regular derivative to me. Many dictionaries mention that oleum ...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

What verb is wine made with?

Which verb did the Romans use for making wine? I can imagine saying vinum facio/conficio/primo and maybe some other options as well. Different verbs might emphasize different aspects or steps of ...
7
votes
3answers
194 views

What is “old” in the age of a wine?

If I were to say "this man is 40 years old" in Latin, I would say hic vir 40 annos natus est. That is, I would use the participle natus instead of any adjective meaning "old", and it is my impression ...
7
votes
3answers
143 views

Cibus sanus — healthy food?

The Duolingo Latin course uses sanus as "healthy" in connection with meals. A healthy lunch would be prandium sanum according to the course. But I always thought that sanus is only refers to the ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

What is “menu” in Latin?

What would be a good Latin word for "menu" in the sense of a list of foods and drinks in a restaurant? My dictionary suggests index ciborum, and another option would be to replace index with tabula. ...
7
votes
2answers
107 views

Crêpes and crêperies

What would be good Latin words for a crêpe and a crêperie? Vicipaedia offers crispa but mentions that the article quality is "maxdubium". (I find the expression "maxdubium" itself, well, maxdubium.) ...
6
votes
4answers
242 views

What exactly was a pastillus?

The English word "pastille" (and related words in other languages) obviously derives from the Latin pastillus. I know pastillus had a similar purpose to today's pastille, and, if I remember what I ...
6
votes
2answers
106 views

Preparing food “al dente”

Is there a Latin idiom for food that is cooked just right (not too much, not too little), similar to the popular Italian phrase "al dente"? I doubt the direct translation denti or ad dentem makes any ...
6
votes
1answer
138 views

Meaning of “cepeo”

What does cepeo mean? According to Google Translate, this means "onions". Are there any connotations, other words that carry the same meaning, or anything else specifically related to it?
6
votes
1answer
187 views

Were mushrooms vegetables to Romans?

Mushrooms are taxonomically clearly distinct from plants and animals (and other kingdoms), but in "cuisine taxonomy" they are typically included plants. The word "vegetables" in a restaurant's menu ...
6
votes
2answers
505 views

What are oranges in Classical Latin?

From the book Rebilius Crusoe by Francis William Newman, the term aurea mala, or golden apples is used to describe oranges. Did any of the Latins have an actual name for this fruit, or was it simply ...
5
votes
3answers
250 views

Greatly fruitful in Latin?

I lack ample knowledge of Latin to piece together a proper equivalent phrase of the following: "Greatly fruitful," or "Great bounty"; in the context of referring to a food being very nutritious. Here'...
4
votes
2answers
84 views

Putting “spread” on a bread in Latin

There are various kinds of spreads one can put on a bread, made from butter, vegetable oils, or other ingredients. What would be a good general word for these products for use in contemporary Latin? ...
4
votes
1answer
542 views

What is a ball as in meat ball?

There are various foods that are called "balls" in English, perhaps most famously "meat balls". What would be a good Latin word for a ball in this sense? I can think of words for a ball in general, ...
4
votes
3answers
186 views

What is plant-based or vegetarian food?

Is there a Latin adjective which means "vegetarian" or "plant-based" and can be applied to food? In this context, I don't need to make a distinction between vegetarian and vegan, for example; I just ...
4
votes
2answers
193 views

How long is a banana?

The word banana and variants thereof appear in a number of languages. The origin appears to be the word banaana in Wolof, if Wikipedia is to be trusted. This word is straightforward to adopt into ...
3
votes
3answers
91 views

A word for national and other cuisines

I am looking for a word for "cuisine". For example, I don't know how to say the following in Latin: I like Nepalese cuisine, but I haven't found any suitable restaurants here. I don't know which ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

How to translate “pesto”?

What would be a good Latin translation for the sauce pesto? I see a couple of possible routes, but it's not clear to me at all what I should call the sauce in a modern context: It seems to come from ...
2
votes
1answer
112 views

What was the standard ancient term for a thermopolium?

This page on thermopolia reports a quotation from Mary Beard, classics professor at Cambridge University: “The best way to escape a diet of bread, cheese and fruit, eaten in small lodginggs over a ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

What is whole grain?

How do you say "whole grain" in Latin? The expressions in Romance languages are fairly similar, and based on them I would guess granum integrum. For example, I might say panem grani integri edere malo....
1
vote
1answer
84 views

Deriving lactuca from lac

The word lactuca refers to lettuce, and Lactuca sativa is the scientific name. Some of the plants in this genus seem to contain some kind of milky liquid which must be the reason for deriving the word ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

Natural or unflavoured products

There are a number of different flavours of, say, yogurts, and one of them is plain, without any added flavours besides what is needed to make the yogurt. In English this flavour seems to be often ...