Questions tagged [case]

For questions about grammatical cases (nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative and vocative). Consider also using the tags 'declension' and 'morphologia'.

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14
votes
2answers
844 views

Which common nouns have a locative?

I recently mentioned to someone the mnemonic I'd learned for the locative: "cities, towns, islands smaller than Rhodes, and domus and rus". In other words, only the names of cities, towns, and small ...
9
votes
1answer
142 views

The interjection “o” with different cases

I recently came across o beatum te in a letter and I was surprised that accusative was used instead of vocative. Lewis and Short indeed indicate that the interjection o can be used with vocative, ...
20
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the logic behind the order of the cases

Most English books of Latin use the order used by Charles E. Bennett: Nominative, Genitive, Dative, Accusative, Vocative, Ablative. But most French books use the following order: Nominative, ...
5
votes
1answer
201 views

Are vestiges or influence of the instrumental case in any way identifiable in Latin and Greek?

I believe the instrumental case was absorbed by the ablative in Latin and by the dative in Greek. Is there any way at all in which influence of the old instrumental can be seen in Latin or Greek?—...
4
votes
1answer
186 views

What is the grammatical “logic” of ablative case in «Tuā et meā māximē interest tē ualēre» (Cic. Fam. 16.4)?

Assuming that ablative case is always a semantic case (see the typical lists of its associated meanings in Latin grammars), I was wondering if Latin speakers could still assign a synchronic more or ...
3
votes
2answers
125 views

How do you address someone in a case other than the vocative?

Suppose I'm talking to someone directly, and use a pronoun to refer to someone. I would use tu or vōs with an appropriate case based on its role in the sentence: for example, sciō tē adesse, "I know ...
5
votes
1answer
108 views

Translation verification

I’m wondering whether my translation is correct. I wrote: tempus fugit; sed muscae fugiunt etiam. I meant for this to mean: Time flies, but flies fly too. I really don't have any knowledge ...