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Questions tagged [case]

For questions about grammatical cases (nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative and vocative). Consider also using the tags 'declension' and 'morphologia'.

4
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1answer
84 views

Why aren't cardinal numbers over three inflected?

I've been looking through some etymologies and it seems to me that cardinals past trēs aren't inflected. Is this correct, and if so, what's the logic in forming words with indeclinable numbers? Take, ...
5
votes
1answer
59 views

Are vestiges or influence of the instrumental case in any way identifiable in Latin and Greek?

I believe the instrumental case was absorbed by the ablative in Latin and by the dative in Greek. Is there any way at all in which influence of the old instrumental can be seen in Latin or Greek?—...
5
votes
2answers
389 views

Why not “eminentissimus” and “reverendissimus”?

When they announce a new pope the "Habemus Papam" text says "eminentissimum ac reverendissimum Dominum, Dominum Why is it? Why isn't "eminentissimus ac reverendissimus dominus ?
3
votes
2answers
69 views

How do you address someone in a case other than the vocative?

Suppose I'm talking to someone directly, and use a pronoun to refer to someone. I would use tu or vōs with an appropriate case based on its role in the sentence: for example, sciō tē adesse, "I know ...
8
votes
3answers
247 views

Differentiating possessive and non-possessive uses of the genitive

In English, genitives formed with " 's " often have a possessive meaning, while "of" may function to form a kind of "genitive" with a non-possessive meaning, e.g., compare "John's photo" and "a photo ...
5
votes
1answer
96 views

Regarding the mode of “terram” in Deuteronomy 28:38

Deuteronomy 28:38 reads: Sementem multam jacies in terram, et modicum congregabis: quia locustæ devorabunt omnia. I think the first phrase before the comma has the following structure (but ...
10
votes
1answer
157 views

What is the logic behind the order of the cases

Most English books of Latin use the order used by Charles E. Bennett: Nominative, Genitive, Dative, Accusative, Vocative, Ablative. But most French books use the following order: Nominative, ...
8
votes
1answer
128 views

When to use “ac” instead of “et”?

What's the difference between the conjunctions: "et", and "ac"? Which one corresponds to what kind of situation? Allow me to elaborate for clarification, and to distinguish from similar questions. ...
5
votes
1answer
78 views

Translation verification

I’m wondering whether my translation is correct. I wrote: tempus fugit; sed muscae fugiunt etiam. I meant for this to mean: Time flies, but flies fly too. I really don't have any knowledge ...
2
votes
1answer
106 views

What case is virtutis in “prope virum summae virtutis sto”?

Consider the sentence, "prope virum summae virtutis sto." What case is virtutis and why? I'm pretty sure that it is genitive due to description, but I'm not sure. In case it helps, I translated it as,...
16
votes
2answers
1k views

When and why did the ablative form?

When did the ablative originate? Additionally, I’d like to know which case was used before the ablative for adverbials. I think it replaced the dative, as I also study Ancient Greek. In that language, ...
9
votes
2answers
216 views

Which common nouns have a locative?

I recently mentioned to someone the mnemonic I'd learned for the locative: "cities, towns, islands smaller than Rhodes, and domus and rus". In other words, only the names of cities, towns, and small ...
7
votes
0answers
87 views

Is it possible to have a single Latin ligature be majuscule and minuscule?

Context The Latin grapheme: "Œ" is the majuscule ligature of the letters "O" and "E". Is it proper—or in-fact possible—to have part of the ligature be majuscule and the other part be minuscule?
6
votes
1answer
63 views

Which case to use with posthinc?

L&S mentions that abhinc can be used with either accusative or ablative. But no use guidance is given for posthinc. Can I use both accusative and ablative to express the length of time, or only ...
17
votes
2answers
1k views

Latin plural of Curriculum Vitae?

Curriculum vitae (often abbreviated CV) is a common Latin locution present in a high number of languages, including English. In English, as in other languages, how to pluralize these foreign ...
5
votes
1answer
126 views

In the sentence “Glory is better than fame”, is “fame” a predicate nominative?

With the intent of translating this sentence to Latin, what case is the word "fame"?