Questions tagged [biology]

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4
votes
1answer
79 views

What does the f. adjective “tulda” mean?

In the scientific name Bambusa tulda, I would like to know what tulda (tuldus?) means.
6
votes
2answers
91 views

Description of Cicadas from 1866

I am a research student from India. I work on cicada systematics and some of the literature on cicadas is in Latin. This one of such literature was written in 1866 and it is very important at this ...
4
votes
1answer
77 views

Meaning of phellos in the epithet for Quercus phellos, the biological/scientific name for the willow oak?

What is the meaning of phellos in the epithet for Quercus phellos, the biological/scientific name for the willow oak? I've tried some obvious resources, but after 50 years in clinical medicine and ...
12
votes
1answer
126 views

'Quae pars anterior quae posterior jure habeatur in toto genere non liquet': taxonomical description of Antarctissa denticulata (Ehrenberg 1844)

In one of his 1844 manuscripts, C. G. Ehrenberg described the radiolarian species Lithobotrys(?) denticulata (now known as Antarctissa denticulata) and, as it was customary at the time, did so in ...
13
votes
1answer
1k views

Examples of species whose Latin and scientific names are different

Biologists have given scientific names to many species, and these names are in Latin. A fraction of all named species was also known in ancient Rome (and medieval Europe), and they had a Latin name as ...
4
votes
1answer
195 views

Maple trees in Ancient Rome

I was reading about maple trees this afternoon, and I was delighted to find out that the genus name is "Acer", named after the Latin adjective meaning "sharp", because maple wood was firm, sharp, and ...
13
votes
1answer
420 views

Beaver and Pollux?

Castor and Pollux are famous mythological twins. Castor is also the genus of beavers. This makes me wonder two things: Are these two Castors related in any way? Was this double meaning observed in ...
5
votes
1answer
651 views

Do the toes have names in (classical) Latin?

Do the five toes have individual names in Latin? I prefer classical Latin, but other variants are welcome too. I learned the names of the fingers yesterday, but I doubt the exact same names are valid ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

What are the names of the fingers in classical Latin?

What are the names of the five fingers in classical Latin? Some fingers may have several names, some may have none; I place no restrictions on the numbers of translations. Googling gives some answers, ...
6
votes
1answer
189 views

Were mushrooms vegetables to Romans?

Mushrooms are taxonomically clearly distinct from plants and animals (and other kingdoms), but in "cuisine taxonomy" they are typically included plants. The word "vegetables" in a restaurant's menu ...
8
votes
1answer
115 views

On Julius Caesar and salmon

I saw a TV documentary today which claimed that salmon was named in Latin by Julius Caesar. It was a side remark, but the narrator elaborated that he saw this fish in Gaul and gave it its name due to ...
4
votes
1answer
91 views

How can I construct a correctly formed fictitious-species name

I'm writing a story in which I want to use a correctly-formed, binomial (Genus species) Latin name for a fictitious species of vampire bat. I want the name to mean "teeth of death", or something very ...
7
votes
1answer
123 views

Did the Romans have a definition for a species of organism?

In today's taxonomy animals, plants and other organisms are organized in species. Defining a species is no simple task for modern biologists, but we have a fair understanding of what a species ...
7
votes
1answer
363 views

Classical words for spelt

The Latin Wikipedia article about spelt mentions two ancient Latin names for spelt: spelta and scandala. I have found spelta used in more recent Latin, but nothing ancient. I have never seen scandala &...
12
votes
2answers
1k views

Is llama lama or glama?

I went to a zoo today, and I noticed that the scientific name of llama is Lama glama. It seems to me that both lama and glama are latinized versions of "llama". Why were two different versions of the ...