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Received pronunciation in Ancient Greek

As S. Teodorsson argues in his work on the phonemic system of the Attic dialect, there is evidence that already in the IV century BC, 'popular' Athenian speech underwent changes such as the merger of ...
Simon Korneev's user avatar
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191 views

Why do we say "misogyny" and not "gynemisia"?

The Greek prefixes phobia and philia are commonly used in many words, such as 'gynephilia' and 'androphilia'. Why is 'miso' (from the Greek μῖσος) primarily used as a prefix in words such as 'misogyny'...
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7 votes
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122 views

Are these transliterations of 11th dynasty names plausibly formed?

Question: Are Mentophis (Μεντῶφις), Monton (Μωντων), and Anatophis (Ἀνατοφις) plausible Greek (and Latin) names for Mentuhotep, Montu, and Intef respectively? Background: Manetho's Egyptian chronicle ...
cmw's user avatar
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When does the diphthong υι occur in Greek, and when it is pronounced as [yː]?

I'm a bit confused by the information I've seen online about ancient Greek υι: it seems an original diphthongal pronunciation was replaced at some point in Attic Greek by a monophthongal pronunciation ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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About Sappho Edmonds 69 Lobel-Page 54 Campbell 54: why the emendation of the participle?

The manuscript tradition for the fragment in the title gives us: ἔλθοντ' ἐξ ὀράνω πορφυρίαν ἔχοντα προϊέμενον χλάμυν For reasons of meter, deleting the ἔχοντα is basically mandatory. However, why ...
MickG's user avatar
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Greek: unattainable wishes about the present

This is a question about how a specific type of unattainable (counterfactual) wish about the present is expressed in Greek. I'm looking for a good way of translating sentences like the following into ...
TKR's user avatar
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When is Latin "qu" transcribed as "κο", "κοι" or "κυ" in Greek?

The most common transcription of Latin qu into the Greek alphabet seems to have been κου in general, but there are some others: κο as in κοις for quis, κοι as in κοιιδ for quid, and κυ as in κινκυε ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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6 votes
0 answers
189 views

How does Homer say "finger" and "leg?"

The English-Greek dictionary by Woodhouse translates finger as "δάκτυλος." However, the Homeric dictionary by Cunliffe doesn't have this word, and searching in the text of Homer doesn't seem to turn ...
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6 votes
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What is the etymology of Ἁμαδρυάς (Hamadryas)? Is the second alpha actually long?

I am trying to find more information about the formation and pronunciation of the Greek noun Ἁμαδρυάς, taken into Latin as Hamadryas. L&S transcribes the second a of the Latin form with a macron: ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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What does Geryon have to do with singing?

One of the Labors of Heracles involved a three-headed giant named Geryon (Γηρυών). I've never seen an explanation for this name, but at first glance it would seem to be connected to γηρύω "to sing" (...
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Did Alexander the Great change the meaning of "Hellenes"?

The Hellenistic era was launched by Alexander the Great, and his death is usually defined as the starting point. The Greek word Hellenes (Ἕλληνες) was in use before, during, and after the Hellenistic ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
946 views

How did "glutaeus/gluteus" come from Greek "gloutos"? Would "glutiaeus" be more correct?

In anatomy, the muscles of the buttocks are referred to collectively as the "glut(a)eal muscles" in English, and are individually given the following Latin names: glut(a)eus maximus, glut(a)eus medius ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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Reviewing the evidence of the spirantization of β (betacism) in Greek

I originally submitted this question to the Linguistics beta site, and those users recommended that I ask anything related to Greek here. Although I understand that it is impossible to assign a ...
Andonis Neilous's user avatar
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163 views

About l. 13 of Sappho 31 Campbell / 2 Edmonds

I was updating the critical note to my blog post on this poem and inspecting Bergk's huge critical note when I saw that, concerning this line, he proposes «ἀ δέ μ' ἴδρως κακχέεται», maybe even «ἀ δὲ ...
MickG's user avatar
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What is this extra source for Sappho 31 Campbell / 2 Edmonds?

I just noticed that Campbell, listing sources for Sappho 31 Campbell / 2 Edmonds, besides Longinus, mentions also P.S.I. (v. fr. 213B). I looked on PSI online, but nothing with the number 213 in its ...
MickG's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
154 views

παντοκράτωρ - a matter of power or authority?

παντοκράτωρ, pantokrator is generally translated as "almighty," interpreted as a matter of power. I.e. the bible talks about one infinite God, El shaddai. But im curious if we may have been ...
Rey Kabrom's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
115 views

Principles of forming epic poem titles from words

Could someone point me to a reliable source towards how are the -ας/-ις/etc. suffixes are applied to form the titles of epic poems? For example, why Ίλιον > Ἰλιάς but Ἀχιλλεύς > Ἀχιλληΐς, and ...
Alexander Z.'s user avatar
5 votes
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Old illustrated books showing daily life in ancient Greece or Rome

When I was learning French, I found it very helpful to work on my vocabulary using a picture book called First Thousand Words in French. For example, it would have something like a full-page picture ...
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5 votes
0 answers
97 views

Puzzling grammar in a Sappho line

A combination of LP fragments, found at 6.A.i here, has the following first two lines: ἐπτάξατε̣ [          ] δροσ[ό]εσσα[-     ] ...
MickG's user avatar
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5 votes
0 answers
393 views

Was the name "Sasan/Sassan" often spelled with a double S in Latin or Greek?

A question on ELU (“Sassanian” vs. “Sasanian”) brought up the fact that the name of Sāsān has often been spelled in English with a double S in the middle: "Sassan". (The same goes for related words ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
69 views

Did Greek ever have long initial consonants?

In this other answer, TKR suggests that the Homeric dative οἱ might have once been something like *ϝϝοι, with initial long [wː]. This makes sense to me, etymologically, since it may have come from a ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
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Can δῖος legitimately be translated as "boundless?"

Homer uses the set phrases ἅλα δῖαν and ἠῶ δῖαν to describe the sea and the dawn. Some 19th century commentators and translators (Buckley) think δῖαν should be read here as "boundless." The ...
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4 votes
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57 views

Are the amynodontidae being slandered?

Wikipedia says that the name of this extinct family of rhino-like animals means "threatening tooth," referencing this page, but that page actually says "Greek: to ward off/threaten (...
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4 votes
0 answers
133 views

Is the Italian town Empoli from Greek ἐμπολή, "merchandise?"

Is the italian town-name "Empoli" related to the greek word "ἐμπολή", meaning merchandise, or gain from merchandise? I met "εμπολή" in the form of "ἐξεμπολημένων&...
exp8j's user avatar
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0 answers
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Is Hades ever associated with iron?

Traditionally, the Greek and Roman god of the dead is associated with gold and silver, since he controls everything under the earth: he has epithets like Plūtōn "the [god] of riches" and Dīs Pater "...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
146 views

Greek: indirect discourse / sequence of moods after κελεύω etc.?

I'm wondering about the proper Greek translation of a sentence like: He ordered me to do whatever I wanted. This sentence has an indefinite relative clause (whatever I wanted) after a verb of ...
TKR's user avatar
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4 votes
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230 views

How did the Greek word "oikonomia" get the meaning of "thrift"?

Some dictionaries seem to include the word "thrift" at the end of the definition for oikonomia. I found some good examples on the Online Etymology Dictionary and on Merriam-Webster: Greek ...
user3789797's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
265 views

Is there any explanation for the formation of "bomphiologia" as a Greek word for "verborum bombus"?

Recently on ELU, a question was asked about the meaning of three rhetorical terms that are obviously based on Greek: “macrologia”, “periergia” and “bomphiologia”. The Greek etymologies of "macrologia"...
Asteroides's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
186 views

Can someone explain this word?

I'm reading Ανάβασις by Ξενοφών. I came across this sentence: "--ἀλλ᾽ ἔστι μὲν ἡμῖν, ὦ ἄνδρες, ἀρχὴ πατρᾐα πρὸς μὲν μεσημβρίαν μέχρι οὗ διὰ καῦμα οὐ δύνανται οἰκεῖν ἄνθρωποι, πρὸς δὲ ἄρκτον μέχρι ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
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Greek compounds: would "creation of knowledge" be sophogenesis or sophiagenesis?

I'm writing an academic text and trying to find a nice term for the concept of creation/generation of knowledge. The Greek dictionaries I consulted seem to indicate sophia or sophos would work but I'...
Etienne's user avatar
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0 answers
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Any scholarly views about how someone like Ovidius might have pronounced Greek words?

Μετᾰμορφώσεις In this word, as can be seen, there is a pitch accent on ω, and also it is generally accepted (per Allen, Vox Graeca) that φ was an aspirated P (pʰ), not a fricative (f). Are there any ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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3 votes
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Did the use of the middle with the semantics of the passive continue as late as koine?

My understanding of the history is that PIE had active and middle voices, while the passive was a later innovation. Therefore it seems that in the early language as preserved in Homer, we see the ...
kfjgdfjkl's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
144 views

Is there a consensus about the actual rhythm of dactyls?

I recently read two analyses of Classical Greek meter: "The phonology of Classical Greek meter" and "The phonology of Greek lyric meter," both by Chris Golston and Tomas Riad. I ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
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Homeric verbs that never take the augment

I've been making some recordings of grammar drills for Homeric Greek (1, 2), and have been wrestling with the question of how to deal with cases where the user is supposed to produce some Greek, but ...
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3 votes
0 answers
67 views

Is there a 'catalogue' of Euclid's use of Greek prepositions in his Elements?

A question on SE-Biblical Hermeneutics quoted Bullinger's Companion Bible referring to Euclid in order to define the meaning of εις in a metaphoric context. Euclid uses eis when a line is drawn to ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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Were aspirations pronounced longer in dialects influenced by semitic languages?

In general, /h/ and similar sounds are quite frequent in semitic languages, in Hebrew it even forms the definite article. So, speakers of semitic origin would seem to me more likely to pronounce the ...
Pavel V.'s user avatar
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3 votes
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130 views

Was the letter phi used in Latin?

Is there any evidence of the Greek letter phi being borrowed to write Latin words of Greek origin as φilosoφia for example? The question is not restricted to Classical Latin.
KimP's user avatar
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προσώπατα versus πρόσωπα, προσώπασι versus προσώποις in Homer

I'm working on learning Homeric vocabulary, and for this purpose I've written a script using CLTK to search for forms of a particular word through the Iliad and Odyssey. The idea is that I don't want ...
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3 votes
0 answers
78 views

What is the nature of variation between αι and α in (Pre-)Greek words?

When trying to answer a previous question about the patronymic derived from Asclepius, I came across the following quotation from Beekes in the Wikipedia entry on Asclepius: The name is typical for ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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3 votes
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Greek: How to translate “την ψυχην του ‘Ομηρου” where the genitive isn’t attributive?

This question is about translating the phrase in the title, which is problem 8 of Drill IV of Unit 1 in Hansen and Quinn’s Greek: An Intensive Course (on Attic Greek). I understand the phrase ...
symplectomorphic's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
69 views

Verbal Adjective of Necessity vs. Possibility

Greek distinguishes between verbal adjectives ending in -τέος and verbal adjectives ending in -τός. The latter (according to Smyth) express either possibility or the perfect passive participle (e.g. '...
Michael's user avatar
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0 answers
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What are the nuances between ἀποδίδωμι and δίδωμι, especially in this context?

In the following text, how does ἀποδίδωμι add a nuance that would be lost with the simpler δίδωμι? Why do you think Plato chose the former over the latter? If we do a quick search on ἀποδίδωμι in the ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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Can we find a quotation from an author containing the word μεγαρτός?

I ran into this this morning, and had an exchange in comments with the other answerer (after answering myself). The word μεγαρτός, I'm fairly certain, means "envied", being the -τος verbal adjective ...
MickG's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
100 views

Dubious passage in Archimedes

I have been interested in finding and understanding the original Greek text for the following quote by Archimedes, which made it to Wikiquote: Those who claim to discover everything but produce no ...
giobrach's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
245 views

What is the logic behind the ordering and numbering of Sappho fragments, and why did it change e.g. from Edmonds to Campbell?

I understand ordering the poems by meter, and perhaps putting those of uncertain meter at the end. However, there are many poems with the same meter, especially Sapphic stanzas (which is probably why ...
MickG's user avatar
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3 votes
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Is there any other reason to put these P.Oxy. 1787 frr. 1&2 together than Athenaeus's quotation? And what about the little Cologne scrap?

I researched the sources of Sappho's ῎Υμμες πεδὰ Μοίσαν ἰοκόλπων κάλα δῶρα παῖδες (whatever the number is). There are two scraps from P.Oxy. 1787, precisely frr. 1-2, and potentially fr. 2(a), with ...
MickG's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
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Patristic philology - editions of byzantine texts

We are aware of the editions of classical texts (ancient Greek and Latin) by Oxford, Teubner, Bude, Loeb. Where should I search for byzantine texts and especially works of Greek Orthodox Holy Fathers (...
SK_'s user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
77 views

Differences between φρονεω and νοεω

What is the difference between the meaning of these two words? How is it different when I φρονεω vs when I νοεω? So far as I understand it, νοεω is from the νους or καρδια, and φρονεω is from the φρην....
Phillip's user avatar
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0 answers
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What is the story of Latin letters U, V?

I recently saw a video stating that when the Romans imported the upsilon(Y) from Greek, they cut the the bottom line from Y and remained V which was not read as V as we know but U. So V(letter) = U(...
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2 votes
0 answers
61 views

Arnold and Conway, earlier change of pronunciation of aspirates?

Describing the pronunciation of Greek in schools in the UK, Allen says that a pamphlet by Arnold and Conway, "The Restored Pronunciation of Greek and Latin," pretty much set the standard ...
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