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Which verb number does zero take? [duplicate]

(Creating spreadsheets can lead you into unexpected directions.) As many are aware of, the number zero itself, is a fairly recent invention, but words for it of course do and did exist in Latin; ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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When does a Latin relative pronoun get "attracted" into the case of its antecedent?

Generally, a relative pronoun agrees with its antecedent in gender and number, while its case is determined by its grammatical function in the relative clause, e.g. Do pecuniam filio [dat.] quem [acc....
brianpck's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
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Why feminine is used in "haec locuta"?

The following sentence comes from lines 74–75 of chapter XXV of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana, after Ariadna has said some words to Theseus: Haec locūta, Ariadna Thēseō fīlum longum ...
Charo's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
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Why "ipse hic" is used here and not "ipse tu"?

Lines 105–107 of chapter XXIV of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana reads (emphasis mine): Cēterum facile tibi est frātrem tuum reprehendere, dum ipse hīc in mollī lectulō cubās. Tūne ...
Charo's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
348 views

Why is "promissum" (singular) used here and not "promissa" (plural)?

Lines 166–173 of chapter XXIII of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana reads (emphasis mine in the word I find difficult to understand):       Mārcus: "Posthāc bonus discipulus ...
Charo's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
383 views

Grammatical number agreement in this sentence

This sentence corresponds to line 57 from chapter XIII of the 2003 edition of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana: Diēs mēnsis prīmus 'kalendae' nōminātur. If the adjective primus is ...
Charo's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
906 views

Why is "astra" in plural in this sentence?

I've found this sentence in an Italian book for Latin learners (emphasis mine): Mathematici Graeci saepe lunam astraque intuiti sunt You can read the whole text here. If "astra" refers to &...
Charo's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
989 views

Why Is This Noun in the Singular?

I'm reading LLPSI, chapter 20 "Parentes" (skipping ahead quite a few chapters, just for a peek and to see how much I can understand from a more advanced chapter). The third sentence reads: ...
Nicolas Miari's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
204 views

Gender of antecedent of "hoc" in phrase "hoc quod"?

In the construction "hoc quod", can the antecedent of "hoc" (neuter) be indifferently a masculine, neuter, or feminine noun; or must the gender agree (i.e., the antecedent be ...
Geremia's user avatar
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16 votes
1 answer
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When should nūllus be singular vs plural?

“Nūllus” indicates a quantity of zero, so it’s not obvious if it should be plural or singular, and I have seen examples of both, but I am unsure what the choice should be based on. The first pair of ...
Florianus's user avatar
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7 votes
0 answers
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Is this use of elliptical neuter superlatives un-Ciceronian?

This may be an oddly specific question, but I've run across comments online that suggest the following usages found in Pliny the Elder's Natural History would not be valid in the Latin of Cicero: Ad ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
109 views

What role does "municipatum" play in this sentence?

The abbot Berno of Reichenau, in the opening sentence of his Prologus in Tonarium, some time between 1021 and 1036, called himself the following: licet parvus meritis, servus tamen Dei Genitricis ...
Coemgenus's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
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Constituendi autem sunt qui sint in amicitia fines et quasi termini diligendi (Cic. Amic. 56)

I was wondering to what extent the agreement pattern exemplified with the following sentences drawn from Cicero's De Amicitia can be regarded as the most natural one. I'm asking this question since, ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
141 views

Deponent verb participle gender

If we consider a deponent verb such as arbitrārī in the perfect tense, hence arbitrātus sum/es/est, is the participle arbitrātus supposed to be declined like a regular adjective? For example if one ...
user35319's user avatar
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9 votes
3 answers
241 views

Why plural "laudantium" with singular "militiae"?

In the Latin Vulgate, Luke 2:13 is translated: Et subito facta est cum angelo multitudo militiæ cælestis laudantium Deum, et dicentium ... "And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of ...
LarsH's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
106 views

Is "their" being masculine or feminine?

The phrase I'm wondering about is "causas sui odii" — 'the cause of their hatred'. The men are discussing the cause of their (the men's) hatred? or the cause of their (the women's) hatred? If ...
Narf's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
418 views

Is "Mei Uxor animusque" a correct translation of "My wife and soul"?

Was looking to do an inscription on a ring for my fiance (engagement ring) Mei Uxor animusque My (plural m) wife (f) and soul(m) The -que implies that these things are close together by making ...
Nick Ellis's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
569 views

Subject-verb agreement when the subject is a dominant participle construction

My question is whether constructions similar to the following English one, which is drawn from Jespersen (1909-1949, vol. V: 138), can exist in Latin, i.e., constructions where (i) the subject is ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
448 views

Why is plural of “mons pubis” not “montes pubum”

Latin newbie here. Was talking with a friend about Martian landforms like Olympus Mons. Then we talked about other uses of mons, like mons pubis. But then I realized I didn’t understand something. ...
user3048's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
315 views

How should "Aurora's Vow" be translated into Latin?

I haven't taken Latin in a few years, so forgive me for any simple mistakes. I'm trying to translate "Aurora's Vow" from English to Latin for the title of a song I'm writing. My question is how it ...
Dirge of Dreams's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
903 views

SPQR: Why not Romani?

The motto of the Roman Republic was, of course, Senatus Populusque Romanus, or SPQR. However, Romanus is a masculine, singular adjective. What confuses me is that it is referencing Senatus Populusque. ...
Imperator's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
199 views

Can a morphologically singular collective noun be syntactically plural?

In English the noun "family" is singular but it means a group (of people). Syntactically it can be singular or plural: one can say "the family is/are…" with either choice. Can this kind of ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
218 views

Ordinal adjectives for single things modifying plural noun?

To refer to "the first and second chapters", do I say: capitula prima et secunda or: capitula primum et secundum?
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
10 votes
3 answers
700 views

Is the Roman personification of chaos masculine?

Miller, in his translation of Seneca, makes Chaos masculine: "let Chaos re-echo the outcries of his grief." Source: Hercules Furens, trans. Frank Justus Miller, ~1100 Here is a link to the Latin ...
DukeZhou's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
565 views

A question regarding the agreement of possessive pronouns

So I have the following to translate: Coronas pulchras filia mea parva portat. And the book answer is: My little daughter carries beautiful wreaths. But what I initially thought: The ...
copper's user avatar
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11 votes
2 answers
781 views

Jenney's First Year Latin, Lesson 37, comparatives with "quam"

I'd like some clarification on which cases are appropriate during the use of the word "quam" with comparatives. I'm teaching Jenney's First-Year Latin (1990). In Lesson 37 (page 426 of the 1990 ...
BrennickC's user avatar
  • 403
3 votes
1 answer
3k views

How can "visio" and "novus" be correctly combined to mean "a new vision/perspective"?

What would be a correct way of combining the words visio and novus? Could I just combine those two or is visio + nova a better option? I would like the phrase to mean something like "a new vision/...
rbirrus's user avatar
  • 101
12 votes
1 answer
357 views

Do Possessive Pronouns Always Agree with the Thing Being Possessed?

I recently came across this sentence (a practice sentence with no given answer) in my Latin textbook: mare nostrum plurimos portus habet I translated this as 'The sea has most of our harbour.' ...
0.5772156649's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
216 views

“FactUM est vespere et mane”: Cur singulare?

Genesim 1:8 Hieronymus traducit ita: Vocavitque Deus firmamentum, Cælum: et factum est vespere et mane, dies secundus. Cur “factum”, non “facta”? Nonne subiectum est "vespere et mane", et nonne ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
31 votes
2 answers
1k views

What gender should a predicate adjective be to agree with a series of things with different genders?

I'd like the translate the following sentence into Latin: Pompeii, Rome, and Herculaneum are visited by the boys. However, since these three cities have different genders, I'm struggling to choose ...
Nathaniel is protesting's user avatar