Questions tagged [affixes]

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4
votes
1answer
53 views

Why was rēfringō prefixed with « re- »?

[ Etymonline : ]  [...]   refringere "to break up," from re- "back" (see re-) + comb. form of frangere "to break" (see fraction). [ Wiktionary : ] Etymology From re- +‎ frangō. I ...
15
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1answer
162 views

How would a Roman refer to a great-great-great- . . . -great-grandparent?

Referring to progressively more distance ancestors, I would list my Pater (father) Avus (grandfather) After this point, it gets a bit shaky. This, for example, gives past ancestors as Proavus (...
5
votes
1answer
108 views

Forming a compound with the second word starting with a vowel

For both Latin and Greek, what rules govern the formation of a compound of two words, with the second word starting with a vowel? I'm specifically most interested in the rules for Latin, since this ...
2
votes
1answer
638 views

What (if anything) does the prefix 'op-' mean in 'operīre'?

This question inspired the following: I should verify whether the prefix really means something. I quoted the French version of Wiktionary because the English version does not state the Latin etymons (...
3
votes
1answer
96 views

What did the prefix 'de' mean in: de- + lacere?

[ Etymonline : ]  [...]  from Late Latin deliciosus "delicious, delicate," from Latin delicia (plural deliciae) "a delight, allurement, charm," from delicere "to allure, entice," from de- "away" (...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

Is the prefix 'in-' redundant in 'instruere'?

This inspired this question; I should verify whether the prefix really means something. instruere "arrange, prepare, set in order; inform, teach," literally "to build, erect," from in-² "on" + ...
4
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1answer
58 views

Is the prefix 'de-' redundant in 'delimitare'?

This inspired this question; I should verify whether the prefix really means something. delimitare "to mark out as a boundary," from de- + limitare, from limitem, limes "boundary, limit" (see ...
4
votes
1answer
231 views

What (if anything) does the prefix 'de-' mean in *defallere?

This inspired this question; I should verify whether the prefix really means something. *defallere from Latin de- "away" + fallere "to deceive, to cheat; to put wrong, to lead astray, cause to be ...
7
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1answer
68 views

Could 'com-' function as a causative prefix?

Preface: Etymonline does not answer this question. I (but please tell me if I should not) quote the definitions for the English verbs (Loan words from Latin then Old French) because they did not ...
11
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1answer
155 views

Prefixes in verbs that appear redundant or meaningless: do they really mean anything?

appellere from ad- "to" + pellere "to beat, drive" (see pulse (n.1)) resolvere "to loosen, loose, unyoke, undo; explain; relax; set free; make void, dispel," from re-, perhaps intensive, or "...
8
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1answer
72 views

Quid significat “-amen”?

Quid suffixum -amen significat, ut foramen, putamen, calceamen, regimen, æquamen, vocamen, etc.? -amen suffixo in dictionariis interretialibus non invenio, neque perspicuam significationem communem ...
5
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0answers
44 views

What governed or influenced or selected which prefix is used to intensify a verb?

In addition to their (usual) meanings as prepositions, many common prefixes ad-, com-, de-, ex-, re-, etc... serve as intensive prefixes; but for a given verb, what governed or influenced or ...