Questions tagged [adverb]

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7
votes
2answers
179 views

Subjunctive with adverb “quam”

Passage: “Quam autem civitati carus fuerit, maerore funeris indicatum est.” Cic. Amic. 11 My translation in English: «Moreover, how dear he was to the citizenry was indicated by the grief of his ...
10
votes
2answers
206 views

Is it “bene videtur” or “bonum videtur”? Adjective or adverb with verbs/copulae meaning “seem”

With verbs like "seem, appear", one sometimes uses an adverb to express how something appears ("she looked well"), at other times an adjective ("he seemed angry"). How did the Romans do it, ...
5
votes
1answer
230 views

Could an adjective be used like an adverb in Latin?

As a general rule, could an adjective be used like an adverb in Latin? What would be some exceptions?
4
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1answer
52 views

Grammatical analysis of comparative parts (i.e. “tam … quam”, etc.)

I have the following sentence from Seneca, epistula 1, §2: "Cum placuerit fieri, toto illum pectore admitte; tam audaciter cum illo loquere quam tecum." However, I'm not sure what the "tam audaciter ...
5
votes
3answers
227 views

“Semper” in the beginning of a sentence

This is my first attempt at a translation for a motto. My intent is to convey "Always be good" as an advice. I think it is "Semper bonus esto". A quick digression on the motto I'm ...
4
votes
2answers
335 views

Is *digne* an adverb in the “Munda cor meum” prayer?

Below is one of the prayers which the priest says before reading the Gospel in the Tridentine Mass. Munda cor meum, ac labia mea, omnípotens Deus, qui labia Isaíæ Prophétæ cálculo mundásti igníto: ...
6
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1answer
152 views

Latin etymology of Spanish “tarde”

In Spanish, the word "tarde" has two different meanings: The part of the day between noon and dusk. Equivalent to the English noun "afternoon". Happening after the due, usual, or proper time. ...
5
votes
2answers
187 views

How often is “et” used as an adverb, and what might distinguish that usage?

The conjunction et, in addition to its common use as a coordinating conjunction meaning and, can also be used adverbially, encompassing similar meanings as those found in words like etiam, item, etc. ...
12
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1answer
178 views

Ūtāturne linguā Latīnā aliquis adverbō «ferē» velut linguā Anglicā verbō «almost» ūtimur?

Linguā Anglicā, saepe cum multīs adverbīs atque adiectīvīs, plūrima quōrum significātiōnēs absolūtās habent (exempla sunt «always» vel «everything» vel «nothing» vel «never», et cētera), adverbō «...
3
votes
1answer
121 views

How do extra and ultra compare?

The adverbs (and prepositions) extra and ultra are somewhat similar but not identical. While I can read the two dictionary entries and get an idea what they mean, I don't feel that I fully grasp how ...
8
votes
1answer
124 views

Which adverbs of possibility and probability warrant the subjunctive?

On my previous question (thus begins the chain) I wrote a comment saying "Illa est bona idea. Fortasse rogem cras." I used the subjunctive because I take "fortasse" to mean "maybe", which to me ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

Does this adverb phrase apply to one or both verbs separated by 'vel'?

The quote below is from the Instituta Patrum de modo psallendi, an anonymous Carolingian or more likely High Medieval document on singing psalms in Gregorian chant. (I've seen one commenter on this ...
20
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4answers
1k views

Why do some Latin adverbs have accent on the last syllable?

In the opening chapter of De Musica (written 387-391), St. Augustine gives an example of a Latin oxytone, i.e. a word with accentual stress on the ultimate syllable: MASTER: Now when we pronounce ...
12
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3answers
956 views

What is an Adverbial Accusative?

In book II, line 141 of Vergil's Aeneid (shown at the end of the question), my notes describe the first word 'quod' as an 'adverbial accusative', but no explanation as to what that means. So my ...
5
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1answer
116 views

zelotypos quam Karus

From this question, I'm curious what the poet is doing with quam Karus: Sic fugiens, dux, zelotypos quam Karus haberis. Thus fleeing, O leader, you are regarded with jealousy like Karus. Imagery ...
5
votes
1answer
75 views

Which case to use with posthinc?

L&S mentions that abhinc can be used with either accusative or ablative. But no use guidance is given for posthinc. Can I use both accusative and ablative to express the length of time, or only ...
12
votes
1answer
3k views

How do you say “perhaps” or “maybe”?

I have a very good guess about how to say "perhaps" or "maybe". But I suspect there are several ways of saying it, with varying degrees of certainty. I wanted to get a better idea. ...
6
votes
1answer
107 views

Do adverbs derived from iste have a pejorative tone?

I would call the pronoun iste a "second person demonstrative pronoun"1, meaning roughly "that thing near you". It can also have a pejorative tone, implying that the speaker does not approve of the ...
5
votes
1answer
48 views

Adverb for approximate numbers

In classical Latin, what is the best adverb for describing approximate numbers? If several work well, are there any differences? I mean saying things like "I have about ten euros". I would translate ...
8
votes
1answer
232 views

What is the exact translation of 'solummodo'?

What is the exact meaning of 'solummodo'? I take it is an adverb, perhaps? Encountered this in new Latin, more precisely in Spinoza's Ethics. It is translated as 'only', but it is not in my dictionary,...
3
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1answer
88 views

When did plus and minus start to mean mathematical operations?

The Latin adverbs plus and minus mean "more" and "less". They are also neuter compatative adjectives. In all languages I know these two words are used for mathematical the operations of addition and ...
8
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1answer
597 views

What is the difference between plus and magis?

The dictionaries I have checked give translations for both plus and magis, and they seem to have a different tone. However, I have found no comparison between the two. They both mean "more" one way or ...
6
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1answer
122 views

A few questions on a sentence from Thucydides (Peloponnesian War 6.68)

I'm having trouble with this short passage from Thucydides: παραστήτω δέ τινι καὶ τόδε, πολύ τε ἀπὸ τῆς ἡμετέρας αὐτῶν εἶναι καὶ πρὸς γῇ οὐδεμιᾷ φιλίᾳ, ἥντινα μὴ αὐτοὶ μαχόμενοι κτήσεσθε. ...
6
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1answer
81 views

Can the adverb nunc be used in apposition?

For a textbook exercise, I translated this sentence from English into Latin. The terrified Callisto, now a wild animal, avoided men and beasts (animals). (Latin via Ovid) Here's my ...
6
votes
2answers
409 views

What do the words “tunc tantum” mean together?

Pope Francis tweeted on September 21st, Sermonem confero cum aliquo sincerum tunc tantum agnosco illum esse donum Dei mihique aliquid pretiosum dicturum. Here is my translation. (Credits to Keith ...
12
votes
2answers
985 views

How to use immo?

What does the word immo really mean and how can I use it? I read this and this dictionary entry, and I was left confused. Some of the uses I can understand, but some I cannot. Either I do not have ...
7
votes
2answers
444 views

Choosing -ter or -iter for adverbs from third declension adjectives

The typical suffix to derive an adverb from a third declension adjective is -iter, but sometimes the -i- is dropped: dulciter but audacter. I am not asking for a rule for choosing -iter or -ter —...
7
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1answer
785 views

Sīc erat scriptum equivalent for spoken information?

From Wikipedia The Latin adverb sic ("thus"; in full: sic erat scriptum, "thus was it written") inserted after a quoted word or passage, indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed ...
6
votes
1answer
174 views

Using “sáné” v. “certé” v. “profectó”?

The dictionary definitions of these three words aren't particularly helpful in figuring out when to use which one. Lewis Elementary's definition of sáné includes indeed, doubtless, by all means,...
11
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2answers
248 views

Did grammarians consider the adverbial -e a case ending?

For adjectives of the first and second declension, the corresponding adverb is formed with the ending -e. For example, pulchre (beautifully) comes from pulcher (beautiful). Canonically this -e is ...
6
votes
1answer
392 views

Latin adverbs ending in -us

There is a small but noticeable subset of Latin positive adverbs that end in -us. (By "positive," I am excluding the standard comparative adverb form of -ius, e.g. citius.) Some examples that come ...