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Questions tagged [adjective]

For questions about adjectives.

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Is verus (true) etymologically related to viridis / vireo (green / to be green)? [closed]

Is verus (true) etymologically related to viridis / vireo (green / to be green)? The closest to this that St. Isidore in his Etymologies p. 124 says: Switches (virga) are the tips of branches and ...
Geremia's user avatar
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How to obtain the stem of a comparative adjective?

Learn to Read Latin says on p276 in Section 109. Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs: Comparative Degree of Adjectives All regular first-second and third-declension adjectives in Latin form the ...
Tim's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Is -is the feminine singular nominative endings of third-declension adjectives with three or two nominative singular forms?

Learn to Read Latin says on p151 in Section 74 Third-Declension Adjectives: To find the stem of third-declension adjectives with three or two nominative singular forms, take the feminine singular ...
Tim's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why do emasculatus and effeminatus mean the SAME thing, despite being formed the SAME way with OPPOSITE morphemes? [duplicate]

The etymological constructions of emasculatus and effeminatus are identical: emasculatus < ex- + masculus + -atus effeminatus < ex- + femina + -atus Since masculus and femina are opposites, ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
460 views

Adjectives in dictionaries

When meeting an adjective in a dictionary, there are some suffixes. What are they referring to? For example: extremus, a, um = extreme amplus, a, um = important iratus, a, um = triggered
mle's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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Is μάλα (mala, adv.) derived or cognate with some adjective?

In Attic Greek, μάλα is an adverb meaning "very, very much, exceedingly." Is it derived from some adjective, or is there an adjective that is its cognate? Is μακρός (makros) the adjective? ...
Tim's user avatar
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5 votes
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Translating plant names used attributively

In English and some other languages, a plant name (or a fruit name) can be used like an adjective ("attributively"), for example apple juice, oak wood, birch bark. When translated into Latin,...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
10 votes
3 answers
2k views

Lack of gender agreement in Aeneid iv.169-70

I was thrown by the lack of gender agreement in line iv.169 of the Aeneidː Ille dies primus leti primusque malorum // causa fuit; I translate: “That was the first day of death, and was the first ...
adam.baker's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
184 views

Novo v. Novus v. Novum for demonym

What would be the correct or most appropriate demonym for someone who was from New Spain? I have seen “Nova Hispania” used for New Spain in some 17century maps but wikipedia also uses “Viceregnum ...
HispanusHorribilis's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
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How to say "bookish" (adj.) in Latin?

How does one say "bookish" adj. (in the sense of possessing speculative but lacking practical reason or social skills) in Latin?
Geremia's user avatar
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6 votes
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"Friendless" in Latin?

I am looking for a general strategy for translating adjectives like "friendless" into Latin. My interest is general, but for concreteness I will discuss my thoughts in light of this example. ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
137 views

sempiternus vs. æternus

What's the difference between sempiternus ("always eternal") and æternus ("eternal")? Does æternus refer to creatures (e.g., angels and human souls) that were created in time but ...
Geremia's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
642 views

Why "suam" and not "eius" is used in this sentence?

In lines 63-70 of chapter XVIII of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana, one reads: Discipuli magistro tabulās suas dant. [...] Magister suam cuique discipulō tabulam reddit, prīmum Sexto, ...
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Grammatical number agreement in this sentence

This sentence corresponds to line 57 from chapter XIII of the 2003 edition of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana: Diēs mēnsis prīmus 'kalendae' nōminātur. If the adjective primus is ...
Charo's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
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Why is "uenetus" a colour name?

I recently came across the following entry on Wiktionary for the adjective "uenetus": of or pertaining to the Veneti; Venetian blue, blue-green, sea-blue Why and how is this adjective ...
Ergative Man's user avatar
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An adjective for Seneca

A particular passage in Cicero's works is a locus Ciceronianus, a work written in the style of Vergil is an opus Vergilianum etc. But which adjective should I use for Seneca? There exists apparently ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
195 views

In Vulgate in Ecclesiastes 2:16, why does it say "et futura tempora oblivione *cuncta* pariter operient" (neuter accusative plural) and not "cunctos"?

In Vulgate in Ecclesiastes 2:16, it says "...et futura tempora oblivione cuncta pariter operient...". I guess that's supposed to mean "...and the future times will cover entire them by ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
203 views

Verb splitting noun and adjective [duplicate]

The concluding prayer of the prime office says: ℣. Dóminus nos benedícat, ✠ et ab omni malo deféndat, et ad vitam perdúcat ætérnam. Why does the verb (perdúcat) split the noun (vitam) and the ...
Geremia's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
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Why is the superlative form of "fertilis" "fertilissimus" rather than *fertillimus?

Superlatives of adjectives ending in -lis are usually formed with the suffix -limus. For example, the superlative of facilis is facillimus. So, why is the superlative of fertilis fertilissimus, rather ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
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0 answers
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Are the positive and comparative versions of an adjective different adjectives or different forms of the same adjective?

I am trying to figure out the difference between a word and a form of a word. Which is the comparative version of an adjective in the positive degree: an adjective different from the adjective, or a ...
Tim's user avatar
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-5 votes
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Is qua an adverb or adjective?

Keller's Learn to Read Latin says quare (rel. or interrog. adv.) because of which thing; therefore; why The qua of the adverb quare may be either a relative adjective (see $86) -- "because of ...
Tim's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Is quam an adjective or adverb?

Keller's Learn to Read Latin says quam is a relative adjective or an interrogative adjective: The quam of the adverb quam ob rem may be either a relative adjective [see §86)-“on account of which ...
Tim's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
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How to tell if an adjective listed in a vocabulary is third-declension or first-second-declension?

In Keller's Learn to Read Latin: When a third-declension adjective has three forms in the nominative singular, the vocabulary entry contains the same elements as the entry for a first-second-...
Tim's user avatar
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7 votes
3 answers
536 views

Adjectives vs nouns and the meaning of a sentence in Familia Romana

Perhaps this is obvious, but I am self-taught at this point. I want to get some basic understanding before I start paying a teacher. I have started reading Familia Romana. I am still looking for the ...
Katie33kate 's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
107 views

I need to translate a quote

This quote is original: "Even to the question whether there can be only one truth, the answer is twofold" I used Google translate to translate it to latin and this is what I got: "Etiam ...
Aidar Kadyr's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
264 views

What are the types of hair in latin?

What would be the adjectives to describe someone's hair? The only I know is "crispus" "curled" Could i just translate the adjectives in English into latin? Straight hair= capillus ...
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7 votes
1 answer
425 views

Can a noun be qualified by two juxtaposed adjectives?

I read online (I'm sorry, I can't remember where) that if two adjectives refer to the same noun, you have to use a conjunction like "et" or "-que". Socrates sapiens senex vir est. ...
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7 votes
1 answer
412 views

General question about nouns and adjectives (can nouns be adjectives and how to decline)

I know that in Latin, adjectives can act as nouns (substantives) e.g. Romani urbem petiverunt. The Romans attacked the city. However, can nouns act as adjectives? For example, stone (lapis, m) and ...
grumio's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
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Ecquis as a modifying adjective

I'm unsure of the bolded part of the sentence: Haec prima sententia est, quam ut clarius explicemus, diligenter attendendum venit, ecquis iuxta hanc sententiam tum in electionis tum in reprobationis ...
MichaelJYoo's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
48 views

How do you assign ambiguous adjectives?

In many cases I encounter situations where an adjective could be modifying different words in the same sentence. For example, in the famous play Miles Gloriosus there is the line: Mala mulier mers est....
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
270 views

What word does 'iucunda' modify in this sentence from Cicero?

I am reading a letter fom Cicero to his friend Atticus and can't quite pinpoint exactly how the word iucunda functions thereof: "Nam mihi omnia, quae iūcunda ex hūmānitāte alterius et mōribus ...
VivatLinguaLatina's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
147 views

How are multiple, hyphenated, or compound adjectives declined [in botanical latin]?

I'm studying some old plant cultivar names. One of the rules for botanical latin is that if an epithet is a latin adjective, it has to agree with the gender of the genus. I'm not sure how to apply ...
Avery's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
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What is the syntax of ‘quamquam omnis secrētī capācissima’?

In Pliny’s letter 1.12, when he describes his meeting with his Domitian-hating friend, he mentions how all servants would leave when close friends came by, and even his wife ‘who was fully capable of ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
157 views

How would you translate "The Snow Queen" into Latin?

"The Snow Queen" here being the Anderson's personage. Regina Nix, Regina Nivis, Regina Nivea, Regina Nivosa? Which is closer to the original meaning? (And what is it, at last?) To me, it's ...
Stas Malavin's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
362 views

Suavis vs. dulcis

What is the difference between "suavis" and "dulcis"? Are they synonymous?
Geremia's user avatar
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7 votes
0 answers
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Is this use of elliptical neuter superlatives un-Ciceronian?

This may be an oddly specific question, but I've run across comments online that suggest the following usages found in Pliny the Elder's Natural History would not be valid in the Latin of Cicero: Ad ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
534 views

Why is there no case agreement between "magni" and "poetae"?

Shouldn't "magni" be "magnae" as it is modifying "poetae"? Fīliae vestrae dē libris magnī poētae saepe cogitābant. The quote is from Wheelock's Latin, chapter 6.
Antichrist's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
754 views

Is "necesse" an adjective or an adverb

Introduction My enquiry arrises from a passage in “Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Familia Romana” in its tenth chapter which is entitled “BESTIAE ET HOMINES” on its fifty-ninth line which is as ...
Mr. Blythe's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
170 views

Can 'talia' modify a noun with an adjective?

I want to say: 'such a strong group', and I'm thinking that this meaning of 'talia' found in the OLD can do this but in all of the examples none of the nouns are modified by an adjective. Does this ...
bobsmith76's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
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What is the general ablaut rule that explains examples like φρήν, πρόφρων, πρόφρονα?

Φρήν (midriff, will) gives rise to the adjective πρόφρων (eager, literally motivated by will). It looks to me like the -ων comes from ablaut applied to -ην. (It doesn't look like a suffix -ων, since ν ...
user avatar
9 votes
3 answers
772 views

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

There are some muscle names in New Latin that seem to be nouns as far as I can tell, such as flexor and extensor. However, according to several Wikipedia articles for these muscles, they behave as if ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
54 views

Is it possible for adverbs, such as utique, to be used as adjectives?

Reading Ambrose Dē bonō mortis 4.14, I came across this passage: Sed ipsa hīc vīta bona sī est, quibus rēbus bona est? Virtūte utique, et bonīs mōribus. But if this life here is a Good, by which ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
788 views

How can you find the stem for an adjective in Latin?

For example, for the word bonus, bona, bonum ('good') the masculine nominative singular obviously has the same stem as the oblique forms. But, with a word like 'our' (noster, nostra, nostrum) how can ...
ermatveit's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
261 views

Why is it "Discipulus pulcher est" and not "Discipulus pulchrus est"?

I think its something with declension, but can't quite wrap my head around why it would be pulcher instead of pulchrus for that phrase.
hifromdev's user avatar
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16 votes
5 answers
4k views

A Latin adjective for New York?

The city of New York is often called Novum Eboracum in Latin. Let us ignore other options for the purpose of this question; I just want to understand city names with two or more words through an ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
149 views

Is there a general method for creating an adjective from a noun?

In an answer to making an adjective from a noun, Joonas mentions that creating adjectives from nouns is not a trivial matter and gives a solution to making an adjective out of chicken for an ...
Adam's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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Can I label an admission as an "ex post facto mea culpa" in this case?

I would like to perform a mea culpa and "admit" that I'd given advice that in hindsight might have been suboptimal as it didn't sufficiently address all possible future outcomes. So calling ...
uhoh's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
302 views

Superlatives (Cambridge Latin Course)

I have one question about the translation of the superlatives. For some reason in Cambridge Latin Course they always give the following translation for the superlatives: laetissimus — very happy ...
Dachi Pachulia's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
323 views

Nouns in locative in connection to adjectives (Does every adjective have a locative?)

I've did a bit of research on locatives and which words can form a locative. On a German website (Link) I found an explanation which words can have a locative: geographical names (like cities and ...
Cyb3rKo's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
175 views

What are the differences between "demens" and "insanus"? Are there any single Latin words (nouns) for "insane person"?

First, I'm struggling with understanding the difference between demens and insanum. My understanding is that demens is an adjective (insane). I've also seen insanum in a few online dictionaries (here'...
mig81's user avatar
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